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Tried a few string silencers. Tried beaver fur strips, but noticed they would unravel sometimes when the string is stored away or after plenty of shooting and I'd lose them in the bush.
I currently use yarn which works alright, however it's VERY annoying for me to replace them every time they get hitchhikers stuck in them.

Which ones did you notice quieted your bow the most and were the most reliable?
 

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Cat whiskers through the string and tied in. I heterodyne the placement on the string 1/4 the string length down from the top and 1/3 the string length up from the bottom.

Gil
 

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Cat whiskers through the string and tied in. I heterodyne the placement on the string 1/4 the string length down from the top and 1/3 the string length up from the bottom.

Gil
I tried that after seeing a video on that but noticed no difference in sound, but I’m hard of hearing. That said, maybe I’m not a good judge of string silencers 😂.
 

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Tried a few string silencers. Tried beaver fur strips, but noticed they would unravel sometimes when the string is stored away or after plenty of shooting and I'd lose them in the bush.
I currently use yarn which works alright, however it's VERY annoying for me to replace them every time they get hitchhikers stuck in them.

Which ones did you notice quieted your bow the most and were the most reliable?
Extensively tried cat whiskers, paracord, wool, polyester yarn and yarn and wool mix, and dyneema. IMO the latter is superior to all others accounting for best fit across criterion:

  • humidity retention
  • longevity
  • debris catching (leaves, sticks)
  • silencing (high and low tones)
  • weight on string
  • ease of application
 

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I tried that after seeing a video on that but noticed no difference in sound, but I’m hard of hearing. That said, maybe I’m not a good judge of string silencers 😂.
So am I. I now have two hearing aids and will try it again. My most silent bows were those I used cat whiskers, heterodyne and used skinny 6 strand padded loop 450+ strings. I also shot heavy arrows.

I think the quietest silencers for a recurve are mountain mufflers. They slow the bow down a few FPS, but speed doesn't kill, silence does.

 

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With the slow speeds of traditional gear, especially for people like me that’s limited to about 40#, I try to make my bow as quiet as I can. I have found that limb types, LimbSavers, and some kind of padding to eliminate string slap do a lot to quiet down a hunting bow. It seems that on some of my lower poundage limbs the string and bow makes more noise than higher poundage limbs, I assume it’s because the string and limbs take longer to settle after the shot.
 

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A friend had a very calm deer jump the string this year and i filmed it. Quiet and decently quick Longbow at 15 yards, his head was down. Hit was not optimal due to the deers movement but still recovered him. Head up shots are better .
 

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Wool is my fav. Dyneema is right there too, wool is just a little heavier I think
I also tried wool and like it. I used Terry Green's Bow Hush and silencers. He has wool silencers and strands of wool to wrap around the top of the string to deaden the string slap noise. I found the more I shot, I would loose bulk in the wool silencers. That was probably a user installation problem and not the silencers. I always go back to cat whiskers though. I never tried dyneema.
 

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Tried a few string silencers. Tried beaver fur strips, but noticed they would unravel sometimes when the string is stored away or after plenty of shooting and I'd lose them in the bush.


Which ones did you notice quieted your bow the most and were the most reliable?
I like Dyneema. Above them all . However currently using beaver fur strips because one of my sons gave me like four packs of it . Rite now only own a WF19 riser with a bunch of ILF limbs ofcourse. Never have had an issue with the beaver fur strips coming undone . I take my time and tie em in good . However me myself find them a bit too long so I cut at least 25 per cent of how it comes packaged off . After I use up these beaver fur strips I have I won't buy any on my own . Nor would I recommend them if you don't cut them down to me they seem bulky. Also I have no chrono to back up my thoughts or words but to me the beaver fur strips seem to cut off like at least 3 fps as crazy as that might sound . Might just be psychological.
Another thing when I was strictly a higher end longbow user/ shooter at one time seems like alot of my LB's were real quiet even without ' silencers ' . However I luv using my WF19, that's just me .
 

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Cat whiskers through the string and tied in. I heterodyne the placement on the string 1/4 the string length down from the top and 1/3 the string length up from the bottom.

Gil
Heterodyne formulas are for strings mounts between solid bases. When you mount with a spring at both ends - everything changes.
 

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I strongly suspect that the amount and placement of weight matters more than the source of the weight.
With no physics nor material science to back this statement, fibre density, thickness and relative stiffness also seem to be factors in dissipation, IME. Dyneema, which has very fine yet dense fibres, seems to work better than wool or cat whiskers at same mass on string, even at a lower weight on my bows.
 

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With no physics nor material science to back this statement, fibre density, thickness and relative stiffness also seem to be factors in dissipation, IME. Dyneema, which has very fine yet dense fibres, seems to work better than wool or cat whiskers at same mass on string, even at a lower weight on my bows.
Well there are 3 possible mechanism for quieting a bow.

1 One is simply having weight on the string this works for the obvious reasons of the the weight changes frequencey and creates interference nodes. We know this is part of whats happening.

2 A second mechanism would be if some of the weight is attacked by something flexible. This would create additional damping. Because the force is one direct is spread out over time some of it will still be acting in one direction after the string starts to rebound. I have no idea how much this matters with the popular silencers. its possible its really important or maybe it isnt.

3 The 3rd would be air resistance. I strongly suspect that has almost no effect.
 
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