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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since it seems the world has cleared out for the holiday weekend I thought I would get a thread going to supplement some of the other great info i have learned here and perhaps to consolidate it into one place where others can share the tips and breakthroughs they have had when tuning a bow for shooting and/or hunting. Maybe it becomes a sticky some day and or helps a noobie get it faster so the improve quicker and keep interest in our game longer. Some may be obvious but it may be good to have it all in one threads many of the others are older and while the info is still good they may be harder to find. Again this may be beating a dead horse and its just a consolidation of what i have read learned and seen in practice but again i think it could be beneficial.:deadhorse:thankyou:

What are your best tips, things you have learned etc that helped you get tuned better and faster. What got you over your hurdles and plateaus in this part of the game?

Here are some of mine and ill ask some questions of others later.

1A) never cut your shafts before you shoot them, its much easier to cut off later than it is to add back.

1B) A good way to not have to cut but to be able to shoot your arrows is to put in an insert with a small piece of plastic bag (not the super thin shopping bags but something a bit more robust) and cut or rip it into a 1inch long strip about 1/4 or so inch wide or less and place over the insert and push this into the shaft. Now with a field point in there you can pull it out with pliers without heat and it holds firm enough that you wont lose the tip and insert in your target. this way you can test at full length without sacrificing a shaft to the archery gods by cutting first.

2) Bareshafting doesn't show you anything till after about 20 yards or so, at least for me. I used to always try bareshafting at 15-18 yards when i started as that was all i could really shoot accurately at the time when i got better i did the same but bare and fletched shafts that grouped together perfectly at 18yds could be off the target entirely at 25 with the fetched grouping perfectly. Get back as far as as you can accurately shoot preferably past 20 yards to make sure you give the bare arrow time to react.

3) One change at a Time!!! if you change nock height and point weight you may not derive what is making the actual change. Also don't make permanent changes based on the flight of one arrow make sure you are seeing consistency in what you are doing before making a permanent change.

4) For nock point adjustments in Bareshaft tuning move the nock point to follow where the bareshafts hit relative to the fletched. If the bareshafts are hitting low vs the fletched lower the nock point till the groups come together.

5) Tune with how you plan to shoot or hunt... Namely if you are going to hunt with a bow mounted quiver tune with it on and have some arrows in there. Sometimes you can get lucky and a bow wont notice the difference other times its entirely different.

6) For a RIGHT handed shooter (Opposite holds true for lefties) bareshafts that impact right of fletched shafts are weak.
You can make said weak arrow act stiffer by
1) Lowering your point weight
2) Shortening your arrow
3) Decreasing you brace height (even though this will also increase speed which is generally counter intuitive but seems to hold true at least for me. if others disagree let me know and ill come back and edit.
4) Add weight to the rear of the arrow
5) add something to the string (silencers etc... I recently found that adding silencers in this case wool puffs was the equivalent of about 25grains of point weight, ie adding puffs made me have to use less point weight by that amount of weight
6) If you can, lower the poundage of the bow
7) Use a thicker string
8) Build out your sideplate

I'll be back but this should get it going. Any thoughts on equivalents i.e. 1 inch of arrow is equal to how many grains of point weight or how many grains of point weight equals how many levels of spine weight?
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Don't beat yourself tuning an never tune when your tired.

I like to get a close tune shoot it for a week or two and the revisit it again




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Team Montana - we are coming for your quarters ;-)
 

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I start by getting my brace where I usually end up all the time. Usually 8.75" for me. I shoot long limbs on a 25" riser. Also, I usually set a 3/8" positive tiller. If I have six arrows, I fletch three and have three bareshafts. I usually set my arrows so the tip of the arrow starts on the outside of the string, and my center of my nock gap on the string is about 7/16ths above the bottom of the button. I take my target and out it on the bale so that the edge of the target is in the middle of the bale. Next, I go to 15m and shoot my middle crawl (30m). I shoot field by the way. Next I aim at the bottom corner of the target and shoot the fletched arrows. Now I keep moving my button in and out to get that arrow hitting the edge of the target. When I have it hitting the edge (usually about 10" up from the corner), I shoot the bareshafts. That will tell me quickly what I have to do next. If i have to raise or lower the nock, I do that next. Once I have them hitting the same height, I look at where they bareshafts are in reference to my fletched. If I shoot light vanes (aae wav) I only have them hitting an inch or two to the right (I'm right handed). If I'm shooting heavier vanes (5gr a peice), I like them 4-6 inches right. It is important to make sure the nock height is the same for the bareshafts and fletched before starting to play with point weight or cutting arrows. If you don't, you could easily get a false stiff or weak showing. If my bareshafts hit left of my fletched I start adding point weight to all the arrows and start back at shooting my mid crawl at the corner of the target and making sure I get the fletched lined up left and right by moving my button before shooting the bareshafts. If the bareshafts hit too far right I either take the point weight off or start cutting the arrow. I keep repeating the process until I get them both where I want.
 

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There's no room on the scorecard for arrow flight. Down range results is all that matters. Everything just gets you close until you group tune.

For the most part you can only tune as well as you can shoot. So a beginner shouldn't worry too much about it.

Tune for a forgiving setup.
 

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Don't be afraid to try the opposite if what "should" be done. You might be getting a false read. I've had bs hitting right and I kept lowering the point weight and it was getting worse. For giggles I point on a 300gr tip and bamb! Right on!
 

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I always make sure I have adjustable tied on nock points set up on my serving. So many things are being moved during a tuning process that years in the past I have destroyed my serving using the brass nock points moving them so much. The tied nock points if tied correctly will screw up and down your serving creating no damage during the tuning process.
If you don't know how to tie on the correct nock points use masking tape that can be removed and replaced easily till the tuning process is complete, then attach your permanent nock points at the correct location. This is a big pet peeve with me.

And always use 2 nock points--one above the arrow and one about 2 to 3 serving strands low of the arrow.

Always make sure your arrow nocks fit your serving good and snug before tuning. No loose nocks on the serving.
 

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I start by getting my brace where I usually end up all the time. Usually 8.75" for me. I shoot long limbs on a 25" riser. Also, I usually set a 3/8" positive tiller. If I have six arrows, I fletch three and have three bareshafts. I usually set my arrows so the tip of the arrow starts on the outside of the string, and my center of my nock gap on the string is about 7/16ths above the bottom of the button. I take my target and out it on the bale so that the edge of the target is in the middle of the bale. Next, I go to 15m and shoot my middle crawl (30m). I shoot field by the way. Next I aim at the bottom corner of the target and shoot the fletched arrows. Now I keep moving my button in and out to get that arrow hitting the edge of the target. When I have it hitting the edge (usually about 10" up from the corner), I shoot the bareshafts. That will tell me quickly what I have to do next. If i have to raise or lower the nock, I do that next. Once I have them hitting the same height, I look at where they bareshafts are in reference to my fletched. If I shoot light vanes (aae wav) I only have them hitting an inch or two to the right (I'm right handed). If I'm shooting heavier vanes (5gr a peice), I like them 4-6 inches right. It is important to make sure the nock height is the same for the bareshafts and fletched before starting to play with point weight or cutting arrows. If you don't, you could easily get a false stiff or weak showing. If my bareshafts hit left of my fletched I start adding point weight to all the arrows and start back at shooting my mid crawl at the corner of the target and making sure I get the fletched lined up left and right by moving my button before shooting the bareshafts. If the bareshafts hit too far right I either take the point weight off or start cutting the arrow. I keep repeating the process until I get them both where I want.
Good post John

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Nice summation DJ!

I don't really have much to add other than while it may seem intimidating at first it is really easy and intuitive once you get the hang of it.

I like to think of tuning as a process, not an event. It's already been said but get it close one day, get it closer the next day, check it once in a while, tweak if necessary. Like Matt said, don't tune when you are tired, I'll add don't tune if you get frustrated.

Sometimes if you have a weak or stiff arrow, instead of trying to sneak up on "perfect" and not go to far the other way, I find it's actually easier to make a big change and see what's what. If your bare shaft is stiff with a 125 grain point, throw on a 300 grainer and make sure it's then weak. If it is you know you can tune in between, if it's still stiff you saved a lot of time and know you need to look at your spine. When it's right, a point weight change of +/- 25 grains should be visible as a slight stiff or weak reaction.
 

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One that came up the other day on here was, a too stiff shaft can show high, and a weak shaft can show low. So true, its something I knew, but have not encountered many times.
Of course if you don't use it you lose it, and it came back and bit me! Good info by all.
 

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This is a tip that I found that's worked well to help me find the right brace height. Now I use it every time I'm working with a big change in my setup. Start with your brace height at the lower end of the manufacturer's recommendation. Run a horizontal line across the lower portion of your target. Shoot a 3-4 shot group with the point on that line and measure/record the group's impact distance above the line. Now begin increasing BH two turns at a time, recording both the BH measurement and the resulting group's impact distance above the line. As you continue to increase BH two twists at a time you'll come to a point where those rising groups start to drop quickly. Go back to the BH measurement recorded with the highest group, that's where your bow is transferring the greatest amount of energy to the arrow. Because wasted energy is usually the source of noise and vibration it should be the smoothest and quietest as well.....
 

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A couple tips that I use are:

Don't practice right after eating and no readjusting the bow after a meal...no medication before a shoot..learned that one the hard way..

2 nocking points I use brass..
I always use some type of limb saver
I will move my nocking point to suit my Point on needed..regardless of what MFG says.
Shooting a bow is 90% mental if your mind is clouded stay home
Don't psyche yourself out over a target like an alligator or turkey they almost all have the same size 10 ring.

The one quote I live by: My shot is the only thing I can control,not your shot,distance to target,the target itself,rain,wind,sun,shade or anything else...and when I decide to give up the only thing that I can control my day is not going to end well.


Maybe this helps


Dewayne Martin
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
There's no room on the scorecard for arrow flight. Down range results is all that matters. Everything just gets you close until you group tune.

For the most part you can only tune as well as you can shoot. So a beginner shouldn't worry too much about it.

Tune for a forgiving setup.
Interesting, how do you tune for a forgiving setup? What makes one group of arrows that tune more forgiving than another combo that does as well? How can you build in forgiveness into your setup?
 
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