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ASA has changed the traditional class for next year. The sight says equipment must meet World Archery rules. I cannot find the actuall rules on the World archery website, and the google searches have all lead to dead ends. Does anyone know where to find a copy of the rules or at least know the basics of the top of their head? It probably won't matter in practice. All the ASA shoots I have been to, the people running it didn't even know the difference between traditional and barebow. We were just the weirdos that show up early.
 

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22.4.TRADITIONAL DIVISION
For the Traditional Division, the following items are permitted:
22.4.1.
A bow of any type, which complies with the common meaning of the word bow as used in target archery, consisting of a handle/riser (no shoot-through type), a grip and two flexible limbs each ending in a tip with a string nock where a single string is attached directly between the two string nocks. In operation, the bow is held in one hand by its handle (grip) while the fingers of the other hand draw and release the string. The riser is of laminated construction and includes wooden laminates or made of one piece of wood. The bow may be a take-down type and may incorporate factory installed metal fittings in the riser for limb attachment, stabilizer bushings, etc. Bows may have adjustable limbs for poundage and tiller adjustment. The bow as described above shall be bare, except for an arrow rest as described in 22.4.3. and free from protrusions, sights or sighting marks, blemishes or other reference marks within the bow window area which could be used for aiming. Weights inside the bow riser are permitted if installed during the manufacturing process and not post construction. Any such weights shall be completely invisible on the exterior of the riser and be covered by laminates applied during the initial construction with no visible holes, plugged holes, covers or caps with the exception of the original manufacturer's inlay or insert logo.

Traditional division riser interpretation
22.4.1.1.
Multi-coloured bow risers and trademarks located on the inside of the upper and lower limb are permitted. However, if the area within the sight window is coloured in such a way that it could be used for aiming, then it must be taped over.
22.4.2.
A bow string of any number of strands.
22.4.2.1.
Which may be of multi-coloured strands and serving and of the material chosen for the purpose. It may have a centre serving to accommodate the drawing fingers, one or two nocking points to which may be added serving(s) to fit the arrow nock as necessary, and to locate the nocking points. At each end of the bowstring there is a loop which is placed in the string nocks of the bow when braced. No lip or nose mark is permitted. The serving on the string shall not end within the athlete’s vision at full draw. The bowstring shall not in any way assist aiming through the use of a peephole, marking, or any other means.
22.4.2.2.
Also permitted are string silencers provided they are located no closer than 30cm from the nocking point.
22.4.3.
An arrow rest, which cannot be adjustable.
22.4.3.1.
The arrow rest can be a simple plastic self-adhesive arrow rest, a feather rest as supplied by the manufacturer or the athlete can use the bow shelf. If the athlete choses to use the shelf, the shelf may be covered with any type of material (on shelf only). The vertical part of the sight window may be protected by material which shall not raise more than 1 cm above the resting arrow or be thicker than 3 mm, measured from the riser directly adjacent to the material. No other types or arrow rests shall be allowed.
22.4.4.
No draw check device may be used.
22.4.5.
String walking is not permitted.
22.4.6.
Arrows of any type may be used provided they comply with the common meaning of the word "arrow" as used in target archery, and do not cause undue damage to target faces or butts.
22.4.6.1.
An arrow consists of a shaft with a tip (point), nocks, fletching and, if desired, cresting. The maximum diameter of arrow shafts shall not exceed 9.3mm (arrow wraps shall not be considered as part of this limitation but may not extend further than 22cm toward the arrow point when measured from the nock groove where the bowstring sits to the end of the wrap). The tips/points of the arrows may not exceed 9.4mm in diameter. All arrows of every athlete shall be marked with the athlete's name or initials on the shaft. All arrows used in any end shall be identical in appearance and shall carry the same pattern and colour(s) of fletching, nocks and cresting, if any. Tracer nocks (electrically/electronically lighted nocks) are not allowed.
22.4.7.
Finger protection in the form of finger stalls or tips, gloves, or shooting tab or tape, to draw and release the string is permitted, provided they do not incorporate any device that shall assist the athlete to draw and release the string. Markings added by the athlete, whether or not uniform in size, shape and color are not permitted in the traditional division.
22.4.7.1.
An anchor plate or similar device attached to the finger protection (tab) for the purpose of anchoring is not permitted. When shooting, the index finger or middle finger must be within 3 mm of the nock or touch the nock (split finger or 3 fingers under). When shooting split finger, a finger separator between the fingers to prevent pinching may be used. A single anchor or face walking is permitted. String walking is not permitted.
Clarification Traditional Division interpretation
22.4.8.
Binoculars, scopes and other visual aids may be used for spotting arrows:
Use of binoculars interpretation
22.4.8.1.
Provided they do not have any visible scales or marks that can be used to range distances. Marks must be covered so that they cannot be seen or felt by the athlete, this includes those placed by manufacturers if they move when the focus dial is turned.
22.4.8.2.
Prescription glasses, shooting spectacles and sunglasses may be used. None of these may be fitted with micro hole lenses, or similar devices, nor may they be marked in any way to assist in aiming.
22.4.8.3.
Should the athlete need to cover the non-sighting eye and or glasses lens, plastic, film or tape may be used to obscure vision, or an eye patch may be used.
22.4.9.
Accessories are permitted.
22.4.9.1.
Including arm guard, chest protector, bow sling, finger sling, belt, back, hip or ground-quiver. Devices to raise a foot or part thereof, attached or independent of the shoe, are permitted provided that the devices do not present an obstruction to other athletes at the shooting peg or protrude more than 2cm past the footprint of the shoe. Also permitted are limb dampeners. Arrow quivers shall not be attached to the bow.
 

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The vertical part of the sight window may be protected by material which shall not raise more than 1 cm above the resting arrow or be thicker than 3 mm, measured from the riser directly adjacent to the material.
I can think of a lot of bows, friends and my own, that would be tripped up by this one, if actually enforced.
 

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Here is the max distance - it is 30m for 3D. ASA was 25 yards if I am remembering right


CHAPTER 9FIELD OF PLAY SETUP - 3D ARCHERY

9.1.COURSE LAYOUT

9.1.1.

The courses shall be arranged in such a way that the shooting positions and the targets can be reached without undue difficulty, hazard or waste of time. 3D courses shall be as condensed as possible.
9.1.1.1.
The walking distance from the central (assembly) area to the furthest target shall be no more than 1 kilometer or 15 minutes normal walking.
9.1.1.2.
The course makers shall prepare safe paths for Judges, medical personnel and to allow for transportation of equipment through the course(s) while shooting is in progress.
9.1.1.3.
The course(s) shall not be positioned higher than 1800m above sea level and the maximum difference between the highest and the lowest point in a course shall not be more than 100m.
9.1.1.4.
The targets shall be laid out in such order as to take into consideration that there are unknown distances only, to allow maximum variety and best use of the terrain, with a fair balance between distance and size of the scoring zone.
9.1.1.5.
For small targets, the organisers shall place two or four targets next to each other.
9.1.1.6.
The targets shall be placed in a way as to present the full target to all athletes.
9.1.1.7.
Shooting distances - unknown distances only:
9.1.1.7.1.
Red pegs:
  • Men and Women Compound Bow;
Maximum distance: 45m.
Minimum distance: 5m
9.1.1.7.2.
Blue pegs:
  • Men and Women Barebow;
  • Men and Women Longbow;
  • Men and Women Traditional;
Maximum distance: 30m.
Minimum distance: 5m
9.1.1.7.3.
The 3D targets come in a range of sizes. The course must incorporate a range of target sizes placed at distances appropriate to their size.
9.1.1.8.
All targets shall be numbered in succession from 1 to 24. The numbers shall be be clearly visible to archers and clearly identify the target number. They shall be placed 5-10m before reaching the shooting pegs for that target.
9.1.1.8.1.
The target numbers shall also function as the waiting area for the groups waiting for their turn to shoot. The members of the group shooting that target can be forward of the number board to assist with shading and spotting as necessary. From the waiting area it should be possible to see if anybody is standing at the peg.
9.1.1.9.
When the shooting peg is free, the group can go forward to the post with the picture of the target – as the secondary waiting area until the target is free.
9.1.1.10.
Clearly visible direction signs indicating the route from target to target shall be placed at adequate intervals to ensure safe and easy movement along the course.
9.1.1.11.
Suitable barriers shall be placed around the course, wherever necessary, to keep spectators at a safe distance while still giving them the best possible view of the competition. Only those persons having the proper accreditation shall be allowed on the course inside of the barriers.
9.1.1.12.
The assembly area shall contain:
  • A communication device (system) allowing contact between the Chairman of the Tournament Judge Commission, the Judge Commission, the Technical Delegate and the organisers;
  • Adequate shelter for team officials;
  • Separate shelter for the Jury of Appeal, the Chairman of the Tournament Judge Commission and the Technical Delegate;
  • Guarded shelter for the athletes' gear and spare equipment;
  • On the days of the tournament, some warm-up targets shall be set up near the Assembly Point(s) for the athletes;
  • The practice field can be used as a warm-up field;
  • Refreshment facilities;
  • Toilets.
9.1.1.13.
The 3D course(s) shall be completed and ready for inspection no later than 16 hours before the shooting starts. At Championships they shall be ready no later than the morning of two days before the shooting starts, except for modified courses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here is the max distance - it is 30m for 3D. ASA was 25 yards if I am remembering right


CHAPTER 9FIELD OF PLAY SETUP - 3D ARCHERY

9.1.COURSE LAYOUT

9.1.1.

The courses shall be arranged in such a way that the shooting positions and the targets can be reached without undue difficulty, hazard or waste of time. 3D courses shall be as condensed as possible.
9.1.1.1.
The walking distance from the central (assembly) area to the furthest target shall be no more than 1 kilometer or 15 minutes normal walking.
9.1.1.2.
The course makers shall prepare safe paths for Judges, medical personnel and to allow for transportation of equipment through the course(s) while shooting is in progress.
9.1.1.3.
The course(s) shall not be positioned higher than 1800m above sea level and the maximum difference between the highest and the lowest point in a course shall not be more than 100m.
9.1.1.4.
The targets shall be laid out in such order as to take into consideration that there are unknown distances only, to allow maximum variety and best use of the terrain, with a fair balance between distance and size of the scoring zone.
9.1.1.5.
For small targets, the organisers shall place two or four targets next to each other.
9.1.1.6.
The targets shall be placed in a way as to present the full target to all athletes.
9.1.1.7.
Shooting distances - unknown distances only:
9.1.1.7.1.
Red pegs:
  • Men and Women Compound Bow;
Maximum distance: 45m.
Minimum distance: 5m
9.1.1.7.2.
Blue pegs:
  • Men and Women Barebow;
  • Men and Women Longbow;
  • Men and Women Traditional;
Maximum distance: 30m.
Minimum distance: 5m
9.1.1.7.3.
The 3D targets come in a range of sizes. The course must incorporate a range of target sizes placed at distances appropriate to their size.
9.1.1.8.
All targets shall be numbered in succession from 1 to 24. The numbers shall be be clearly visible to archers and clearly identify the target number. They shall be placed 5-10m before reaching the shooting pegs for that target.
9.1.1.8.1.
The target numbers shall also function as the waiting area for the groups waiting for their turn to shoot. The members of the group shooting that target can be forward of the number board to assist with shading and spotting as necessary. From the waiting area it should be possible to see if anybody is standing at the peg.
9.1.1.9.
When the shooting peg is free, the group can go forward to the post with the picture of the target – as the secondary waiting area until the target is free.
9.1.1.10.
Clearly visible direction signs indicating the route from target to target shall be placed at adequate intervals to ensure safe and easy movement along the course.
9.1.1.11.
Suitable barriers shall be placed around the course, wherever necessary, to keep spectators at a safe distance while still giving them the best possible view of the competition. Only those persons having the proper accreditation shall be allowed on the course inside of the barriers.
9.1.1.12.
The assembly area shall contain:
  • A communication device (system) allowing contact between the Chairman of the Tournament Judge Commission, the Judge Commission, the Technical Delegate and the organisers;
  • Adequate shelter for team officials;
  • Separate shelter for the Jury of Appeal, the Chairman of the Tournament Judge Commission and the Technical Delegate;
  • Guarded shelter for the athletes' gear and spare equipment;
  • On the days of the tournament, some warm-up targets shall be set up near the Assembly Point(s) for the athletes;
  • The practice field can be used as a warm-up field;
  • Refreshment facilities;
  • Toilets.
9.1.1.13.
The 3D course(s) shall be completed and ready for inspection no later than 16 hours before the shooting starts. At Championships they shall be ready no later than the morning of two days before the shooting starts, except for modified courses.
ASA is still using their own course and scoring. 25 yards unknown for traditional this year. They are just using WA bow specs.
 

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That 1cm above the arrow it is enforced - hence my side plates are cut to be compliant
It's that and the thickness. Some risers cut relatively far past center end up with more than 3mm thick strike plate to get a good tune (with arrows at hand). Confusing rule too as a simple plastic rest puts the arrow further out than 3mm.
 

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It's that and the thickness. Some risers cut relatively far past center end up with more than 3mm thick strike plate to get a good tune (with arrows at hand). Confusing rule too as a simple plastic rest puts the arrow further out than 3mm.

No riser that is respecting the WA requirements is cut as deep as you say. I have the Border which is the deepest cut past centre riser and it is 5/16". With a normal side plate and a small diameter arrow I was able to have the centreshot as required (arrow aligned with the string). With a "normal" arrow it would have been the tip on the left side of the string. Most risers and one piece bows are cut max 3/16 past centre. No problems with the 3mm rule.
 

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No riser that is respecting the WA requirements is cut as deep as you say. I have the Border which is the deepest cut past centre riser and it is 5/16". With a normal side plate and a small diameter arrow I was able to have the centreshot as required (arrow aligned with the string). With a "normal" arrow it would have been the tip on the left side of the string. Most risers and one piece bows are cut max 3/16 past centre. No problems with the 3mm rule.
I have your basic de facto black plastic rest right here that puts the arrow ~3.5mm out, when including the adhesive backing. Do they really get out the calipers and check this?
 

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Remote, in my experience they don't reinforce this. The 3mm is a lingering thing from a previous rule that was applied just to the shelf material thickness. Initially they were not allowing more than 3 mm material thickness on top of the shelf. Someone who's not shooting decided to make it general for both sides.
 

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What is this ASA of which you speak? I have not run across it out here in the Golden West. The distances seem awfully short. Out here most clubs have from two to five field archery courses out to 70 or 80 yards. Sometimes we limit the unmarked traditional distances to 50 or a bit less.

How does it work? - lbg
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
ASA is probably the biggest 3d organization in the south and Midwest. Mostly compound shooters. They allow traditional shooters, but do their best to make us not enjoy it. Compound shooters start a 900 and passing is not allowed, you have to bring a chair and wait for the group in front of you to move. If you have a group of traditional and barebow we can go out ahead if we get there before 7. Then we have to wait around until 1 or 2 for the winning check. The only good part is payouts for the winners.

I like shooting NFAA field and outdoor targets better, but can't get many shooters to shoot field here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
What is this ASA of which you speak? I have not run across it out here in the Golden West. The distances seem awfully short. Out here most clubs have from two to five field archery courses out to 70 or 80 yards. Sometimes we limit the unmarked traditional distances to 50 or a bit less.

How does it work? - lbg
Current Clubs (asaarchery.com)

Looks like they don't have any in Californistan. You wouldn't like it anyway, even the compound classes are separated into 30, 40 and 45 yards max.
 

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I have mixed feelings in regards to the new rules. I shot trad division ASA one time but switched to BBR. If the goal is to enhance shooter readiness for WA 3D worlds, then why not go the distance also? Curious to see how this affects numbers at the Pro/Ams. Very few “Trad” that didn’t shoot metal risers at the Pro/Ams, those like Delano and I think his name was Crouch shoot extremely well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have mixed feelings in regards to the new rules. I shot trad division ASA one time but switched to BBR. If the goal is to enhance shooter readiness for WA 3D worlds, then why not go the distance also? Curious to see how this affects numbers at the Pro/Ams. Very few “Trad” that didn’t shoot metal risers at the Pro/Ams, those like Delano and I think his name was Crouch shoot extremely well.
Delano almost always shoots a Bob Lee off the shelf. Nothing changes for him. There were mostly metal risers and plungers when I went to state a couple times, those guys would be forced to barebow recurve or change setups.

Last year they tried 30 yards and shooters stopped going. I don't think they had enough for shooter of the year awards. I don't even see a Traditional class as an option for sign up for the indoor in Paris this year. That was a fun shoot last time. Since we were 30 yards, we shot on the line with the novice pins class.
 
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