Trad Talk Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read that 21 Century Edge and the Fox Triple Crown are pretty popular with the field/target enthusiast. It got me wondering if there is a Preferred or well thought of Wood Recurve for the Traditional "field/target" class. I noticed Brackenbury has introduced the K2 gearing towards that market. I would think the Widow MA series would be due to the heavy riser. I really like the looks of a deflexed riser geometry like a Bob Lee or Fox High Sierra. Anyways, was just curious and though I'd ponder out loud. HA. Thanks for your thoughts. Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,749 Posts
If by field/target you mean hunting/target then there would be many choices. My thoughts are if you asked 20 of us you'd get 20 different answers. In the old days we had Bear Tamerlanes and Hoyt Pro Medalists for field/target work but in modern wood hunting bows there are dozens that will do the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm probably using the wrong terminology but when I think of field archery I was thinking more tournaments. Paper punching or 3d. I know most any ol bow will do the job I was just curious if at the tourneys people see more Widows or Borders or such. I had an Eatmon 66 that was a wonderful all purpose recurve. Just couldnt pull the weight anymore.
 

·
finger shooter
Joined
·
3,439 Posts
Yes... the Hickman Critter Getter, currently being made by Dan Croft down in Puyallup, one of the most stable wood TD recurves I have ever shot. If you ask around the Skookum Archery club he lives a mile from there.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
A lot of top hands choose a custom takedown recurve. A large riser and the metal limb bolts give more mass and stability than most one piece bows. A longish model drawing less than 50 pounds is the common choice for a new hunting style bow. But many of us also use vintage one piece target recurves which have similar mass. Mine is a Hoyt Pro Medalist. There are many other good ones, and the various Bear models are the most common on the used market. 35 pounds at your draw length is sufficient weight, with light arrows. 68 or 70 lengths are common. These are still the most accurate wooden bows and are fairly economical compared to custom bows. - lbg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
If you're looking at vintage bows I'll throw a recommendation for a Root Pendulous Supreme if you can find one. Mine is 38#, smooth as butter, and truly balances like any top end barebow setup. They're 68" and just easy to shoot. Probably harder to find than the Bears and such, though.

For modern your options are a lot more limited... not many bowmakers out there producing many 64+ inch recurves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
I shoot an Great Plains Paragon wood bow. it's a T/D they make for target and comes in longer lengths (mine is 66"), very stable and with phenolic/zebra wood riser with good mass and balance. Cut past center, it's even drilled for a plunger (I shoot it with an elevated rest).
Marco
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top