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Harness of course but staying connected at all times is a must.

my bet, most accidents are when going from the ladder to the stand. I have a friend that fell because one of the pegs on his ladder broke
That is one thing I fear using climbing sticks, a step breaking and getting gouged when it happens.
 

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That is one thing I fear using climbing sticks, a step breaking and getting gouged when it happens.
Best to follow the practice of 3 points of contact, climbing deliberately and one broken peg won鈥檛 sink you.
 
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Harness of course but staying connected at all times is a must.

my bet, most accidents are when going from the ladder to the stand. I have a friend that fell because one of the pegs on his ladder broke
This. Ten years ago I took a 20鈥 fall after hanging a new stand, stepping onto the platform...and both cables broke simultaneously as I was about to strap in. Luckily I landed on my feet...unluckily, I still broke my pelvis in three places, as the force drove upwards. Do not recommend...
 

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I should qualify my comment.

The guy I know that fell was a Kansas rancher using one of those cheap long sticks with the steps welded to the one center steel column. It was probably 10+ years old. This guy goes in and out of these stands a lot鈥e even sets up these stands sometimes without a harness.
My point, he is pretty cavalier about safety..and it cost him though he only fell about 8鈥.

A buddy Matte in Kansas gave me some great advice years ago. Always be connected if you can. Its best to use a throw line and set one of the safety ropes with a prussick or Klemheist that will arrest any fall Before climbing any tree.

If not, consciously climb slow making sure you always have 3 good points of contact- it works.
 

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I experimented with some stands for the first time with my longbow. I always used stands with my crossbow and preferred using trad gear on the ground, but believe it or not a self-climber is still my favourite. As long as your seat straps are shortened all the way and the top half is at knee height, you have clearance for a 60" amo bow when standing up.
Plant Plant community Ecoregion Natural landscape Tree
 

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The only decent thread on this I could find was from over a decade ago, and was more focused on brands. I figure the scene has probably changed since then.

I shoot trad bows up to 62" in length, tending more to 58" in dense forest, and am of average weight for my slightly above average height. I would be wanting it for shooting deer and goats above their scentline along known trails, and also boars at a feeder. Both are in very dense undercanopy situations, so near impossible to stalk.

My basic question is: seat or harness style, and why? My more complex question, is if using a seat, do you not need a safety harness anyway?

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I've been bowhunting long before there were safety harness's and even before safety belts.

I have experienced inch crawling up a tree and sliding down with a Baker climbing Treestand in the 80's. I have hung who knows how many hang on stands wrapping a leg around a tree trunk with nothing other than my leg from keeping me from falling 15-20 feet. I have cheated death and being maimed 3x having fallen the first time to only catch a screw in step in the ribs and thinking I broke a rib only to be told I was fortunate and bruised them, Falling when a step pulled out of a tree above a rock wall and being lucky enough to get a foot on the trunk to push me far enough away that the only thing that hit the rocks was my boots. No issues from that incident and the third was a strap in 2001 that got caught on my arm and losing my grip and falling flat on my back about 18' up. I bounced up so quick you would think I was a ball only to collapse in pain and lay there for almost an hour. This was the first year I had a cell phone and was able to call my brother while writhing in pain to help me out of the woods. This last incident was on a Saturday and Sunday night I had such pains in my stomach and side that I thought I had internal bleeding only to be relived that I had the flu. I have been fortunate beyond what anyone should be doing what I love!

I am 56 today and still prefer a hang on as my primary stand because it is more versatile and I don't have to worry about hitting a cross bar but I am not as agile or resilient as I was 20+ years ago and while I will set my second ladder section without being strapped to a tree any higher and I am using both a lineman belt and if in a climber I use a long safety line and tie my bow and pack to the bottom of the line.

All of that being said I posed this question that's related to this subject on FB just yesterday because I have only been using the strugglestick since this past winter bow and was fortunate to get ta doe.

"Being new to this I am curious how they set up their climbers?

I have one with an open front and one with a cross bar. I missed a buck last winter because I had one come in from the front which caused me to cant the bow too far to keep good eye alignment. The following hunt I used the open front but the shot came from the back of the tree which is my preferred way of setting stands. The reason being the tree blocks the view of the deer and with the longer recurve limbs I felt I had better clearance drawing alongside the stand.

Looking forward to hearing how everyone sets their stands.

Todays set up. I am expecting the deer to come from behind me which is also where the wind is blowing from and going out to a power line to feed."

 

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For your first treestand, keep it simple. Get a set of climbing sticks and a hang-on stand with a seat that flips up out of the way should you wish to stand for a while. From a safety standpoint, you need a treestand safety harness with a lineman's belt.

Treesaddles aren't for everyone and probably not the best choice for first time climbers. Those of us who use them, know that when properly set up, they allow the bowhunter to shoot nearly 360 degrees around the tree and length of your bow is a non-issue. Btw, I'm 70, 5'11", 240#, which illustrates that you don't have to be a youngster to hunt from a treesaddle.
 

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Treesaddles aren't for everyone and probably not the best choice for first time climbers. Those of us who use them, know that when properly set up, they allow the bowhunter to shoot nearly 360 degrees around the tree and length of your bow is a non-issue. Btw, I'm 70, 5'11", 240#, which illustrates that you don't have to be a youngster to hunt from a treesaddle.
70 years old and using a saddle 馃槻, that鈥檚 inspiring, and I thought at 67 I was too old. I always thought it was a young man鈥檚 game but after doing a lot of research I was surprised at how many older hunters use them.
I looked at them hard to set up in double and triple trunk trees, but after figuring out what I wanted I would have about 700.00 into the gear so I shelved that idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I've been bowhunting long before there were safety harness's and even before safety belts.

I have experienced inch crawling up a tree and sliding down with a Baker climbing Treestand in the 80's. I have hung who knows how many hang on stands wrapping a leg around a tree trunk with nothing other than my leg from keeping me from falling 15-20 feet. I have cheated death and being maimed 3x having fallen the first time to only catch a screw in step in the ribs and thinking I broke a rib only to be told I was fortunate and bruised them, Falling when a step pulled out of a tree above a rock wall and being lucky enough to get a foot on the trunk to push me far enough away that the only thing that hit the rocks was my boots. No issues from that incident and the third was a strap in 2001 that got caught on my arm and losing my grip and falling flat on my back about 18' up. I bounced up so quick you would think I was a ball only to collapse in pain and lay there for almost an hour. This was the first year I had a cell phone and was able to call my brother while writhing in pain to help me out of the woods. This last incident was on a Saturday and Sunday night I had such pains in my stomach and side that I thought I had internal bleeding only to be relived that I had the flu. I have been fortunate beyond what anyone should be doing what I love!

I am 56 today and still prefer a hang on as my primary stand because it is more versatile and I don't have to worry about hitting a cross bar but I am not as agile or resilient as I was 20+ years ago and while I will set my second ladder section without being strapped to a tree any higher and I am using both a lineman belt and if in a climber I use a long safety line and tie my bow and pack to the bottom of the line.

All of that being said I posed this question that's related to this subject on FB just yesterday because I have only been using the strugglestick since this past winter bow and was fortunate to get ta doe.

"Being new to this I am curious how they set up their climbers?

I have one with an open front and one with a cross bar. I missed a buck last winter because I had one come in from the front which caused me to cant the bow too far to keep good eye alignment. The following hunt I used the open front but the shot came from the back of the tree which is my preferred way of setting stands. The reason being the tree blocks the view of the deer and with the longer recurve limbs I felt I had better clearance drawing alongside the stand.

Looking forward to hearing how everyone sets their stands.

Todays set up. I am expecting the deer to come from behind me which is also where the wind is blowing from and going out to a power line to feed."

Amazing post. Lucky man. Sheesh.
 

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This. Ten years ago I took a 20鈥 fall after hanging a new stand, stepping onto the platform...and both cables broke simultaneously as I was about to strap in. Luckily I landed on my feet...unluckily, I still broke my pelvis in three places, as the force drove upwards. Do not recommend...
A harness would have prevented this. I hook up from the ground up and down, but when using a hang on with sticks I always have anxiety taking that step from the top stick to the stand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Top suggestions in this growing thread. Safety tips are gold. Can tend to be a bit pro-risk so no doubt would've ended messing myself up with gravity and a tree. Seeing what of these makes and models I can find over here in the EU. Leaning toward saddle for portability and safety in one. Sometimes walking in hours to my hunting spots.
 
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