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Ive always respected those that had the humility to ask when they need help and realized they could learn much faster by skipping the mistakes others may have made.

Personal experience is great and you learn a lot, but its not always the most efficient way to get where your trying to go.
 

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Bart Harmeling
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Not to poke fun or step on toes but just so many of the questions I see on here could be easily answered by just taking the bow out and doing some experimentation. Don't people know how to do that anymore?
I think they know how to experiment, but sometimes asking the right question can save a lot of time.
 

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On top of what others said, I also think it's simply time and skill. Some people, like myself, don't have the luxury to shoot in their backyard and there are times when I can't make it to the range for weeks. And, for beginners, experimenting may not be able to tell them much if their form and aim are not good.

It's hard to get anything out of experimentation without repetition and consistency. The most I learned about my shooting was when I was able to make it to the archery shop for indoor leagues and when my commute took me by an archery range with field ranges. Being able to compare scores while experimenting is huge.
 

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On top of what others said, I also think it's simply time and skill. Some people, like myself, don't have the luxury to shoot in their backyard and there are times when I can't make it to the range for weeks. And, for beginners, experimenting may not be able to tell them much if their form and aim are not good.

It's hard to get anything out of experimentation without repetition and consistency. The most I learned about my shooting was when I was able to make it to the archery shop for indoor leagues and when my commute took me by an archery range with field ranges. Being able to compare scores while experimenting is huge.
Best answer, not kissing butt, just truth!👍
 

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Super Moderator
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Archery, and civilization, advance by drawing on the experimentation and study of those who came before us. Thousands of years of it. You cannot replicate that in your backyard. Learn from masters and champions. There are some hereabouts. - lbg
 

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i started out thinking one thing, but I can clearly see some good on all sides of this question - now.
 
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I'm with Sam on Lumis bring up the best comment. An experiment can have only one variable in order to get a definite answer. So, if you have three - form, aim, and your theory - how do you get a definite answer.

Well, my answer to that is be a good shot, lol. That helps, but even good shots miss, so in my opinion, the answer is repetition. Get the same answer 49 time out of 50 and I'm pretty sure you have an answer. How about 9 out of 10?

Right now I'm trying to compare Hex 8's, Backwoods composites, CV5's and CV9's. Eventually I'll have all in the same poundage. Or at least very close. I've run into a problem already with just the Hexes and BWC's. My quick tuning has the Hexes at 17 gpp and the BWC's at 11. Part of that problem is because I was excited to shoot the BWC's and just put them on an Elite riser and I have the Hexes on a Tempest. I can't count high enough to get all those variables. During hunting season I don't really want to mess with my hunting bow!

Here's something that we all should know. Tuning is just a experiment, with the end goal of getting an arrow to fly straight AND impact where we're looking. Have bare shaft impact to the left (RH) of the fletched you need to add weight and test again. One of the reasons we shoot groups is to weed out a second variable. Well, no. A fourth variable - form, aiming, change in point weight, and incorrect spine. THAT's BEGINNING to describe the problem. Add a false reading to make things really complicated.

Bowmania
 

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I see the issue as lack of knowing what information the group needs to help the individual asking the question. “What arrow for my 50# bow” is not much help. The answers will vary like the question.
 

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Losing arrows since 1966
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337 Posts
… which comes first, chicken or the egg?...*
...I am in the “just go try it camp”… experience and scar tissue are the best teachers….
...Second best is a group of people on the internet, with decades of experience and scar tissue…

… Thank God for Viper1, Grantmac, and a few more that have been patiently answering the same beginner questions for as long as there have been internet forums….
...I have evolved into a very knowledgeable archer, with good form and accuracy because of the shared knowledge of all the members….so, ask away...then go do… repeat...


* ...The egg came first...
 

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I think the more pressing related question is why the same thing gets asked repeatedly instead of just searching for the topic which has likely been beaten to death already?!
He/She is in the RIGHT Place to ask!
That is what we are HERE for; Keep asking, Rock on!👍👍👍👍✅
 

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When living in a big city I was so desperate for an opportunity to 'experiment' that I turned one wall of the apartment into a backstop. My longest lane was 12m from the lounge, through the doorway, to the bedroom. Put so many arrows through it they ate into the wall.

On weekends I'd bus and train miles to a local cramped club to try to get an elbow in, if it wasn't raining or sub zero, or commute hours just to find a patch of forest with no eyes on it so I could continue to 'experiment'. Being able to shoot more than 15m, alone and in quiet, was a luxury bar none for me, for about 5 years.
 

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You missed the point of my response which had nothing to with the OP’s original question and is directed at the related fact that the same basic questions get asked over and over on here when the answer can be easily found by searching threads and reading the previous discussions. Much to the OP’s question, it comes down to the lack of willingness to put effort in in some cases, not all though.
 

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i started out thinking one thing, but I can clearly see some good on all sides of this question - now.
Some elements of archery are common to all, or at least most archers, and asking questions of others is the quickest and best way to learn: As others have pointed out, ability to learn from others is responsible for most human progress in nearly all areas of endeavor. There is benefit in searching old threads: It's quicker than asking a question and then waiting until people respond, and you benefit from the insights of many archers who may no longer be active on this site. There's also benefit in asking the question again in a new thread, as some of the folks who respond may have different insights than those who responded to past threads.

On the other hand, every archer's physical characteristics are at least somewhat unique, and every one of us is at least somewhat unique in the way that our conscious and subconscious minds and our bodies work together. There are many aspects of archery, then, that are unique to each individual archer: For a coupld of examples, it helps to hear other archer's thoughts and experience with shooting form, and to hear how other archers train their subconscious minds to control all the muscles (virtually every muscle in our bodies) and the senses that are involved in shooting an arrow, there is no substitute for personal exploration, experimentation, and practice.

So.... in my view TT is a great resource for archers of all ages and experience levels, and I don't mind if somebody asks a question that's been asked many times before..... but personal exploration and experimentation are essential too.
 
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