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Guys I just got a new batch of carbon arrows that are the exact same model spine fletching style length gpi etc one batch I bought 2 years ago the other is new and if I go out and shoot my gaps with the new arrows are different. They tend to shoot 3-4 inches higher than the old arrows of the exact same spec. Strangely they both seem to bareshaft fine on the bow but it's basically that my point on has gotten a few yards farther with the new batch even though all things are exactly the same. Any thoughts? Have you seen that where there is that kind of variation in a carbon shaft of the same make and model?
 

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Anytime a carbon arrow changes the wrap it will change not only the spine, but the weight. Carbon express recently redesigned the wrap on several models. The weight and spine change was reflected in the brochure that comes with the arrows.

The carbon wrap that has the graphics is the culprit. Its thickness and the resulting weight will change a lot of stuff
 

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Check them on a grain scale and spine tester. I've been shooting Beman ICS shafts for about 14 years now, and the last batch I bought specs the exact same as the first. Victory shafts are alao very consistent.
 

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Good idea to check the spine occasionally. I've got one batch that has up to an 18 lb difference in spine. They are rated as 55 - 70 lb. When I checked them on a 26" spine tester they were anywhere from 92 lb to 110 lb
 

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Most carbons I checked on a spine tester ran heavy. They were consistent through out the dozen but higher than marked. As I recall, GoldTip were right on as marked at .400
 

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I can't add anything to your specific question but I would like to add an FYI about carbons in general.

If I'm not mistaken, ICS Bowhunters are a pultruded shaft. Consequently, because of the manufacturing process, the straightest part of the arrow is the "middle," and any straightness run-out will usually be at the ends.

When you cut a pultruded shaft to length, you can actually make them straighter than advertised if you trim equally from both ends instead of just trimming from the front.

In essence, you can take a +/- .006 shaft and make it a +/- .003 shaft...or better.
 
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