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Civil but Disobedient
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noticed recently that the muscles that are most tired after I shoot are my abdominal's. The abdominal muscles are used to stabilize the body during the shot. The KSL method makes strong use of the core muscles, which are engaged prior to the draw, and loaded as the upper body rotates from an open stance to align with the target, while the hips stay fairly stationary. If you want to see what it feels like, try the following with a light stretch band, or no band:

Assume an open stance
Come to full draw and check the stability of your T
Exhale, lower your rib cage, and settle your upper body into your pelvis while tightening your abdominal muscles. Push your pelvis forward slightly and tighten your gluts (This is the hard part for me).
Now retest the stability of your T.

Engaging the core in this way creates the so called "kinetic chain" that connects your body from your feet, through your core, to the bow. The idea is to engage your core prior to the draw and to keep it connected throughout. It takes a lot of work to get down. I have been working on it for some time and still have a long way to go to feel comfortable and repeatable.

Any thoughts from others? Do you engage your core when you shoot? How?
 

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I do abdominal and pelvic exersizes due to a back injury so have reasonable stability.

Kayaking works everything involved with stability and core strength.
After a couple of weeks paddling you won't even think about it because it will just happen naturaly.

John.
 

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Hank I don't tighten my core, but probably should. I do sometimes find myself falling backwards while executing the shot.
 

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Core training is essential to any extreme physical activity

I am a huge circuit and cross training fan and I like to in operate a lot of Giant sets , super sets and rope work mixed with core exercises to round things out
 

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Barebow recurve
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Ditto on the kayak and SUP. Engaging the core makes a large difference, increasing booth speed and endurance. I am always surprised after doing a SUP workout (4-5 miles in less than an hour) how my feet are sore afterwards and not my hands or arms - it is from hanging onto the board with my feet from the thrust being generated from the core. I crank hard with the abs and lats while the toes hang on for dear life, LOL.

To be honest, I do not consciously engage core while shooting. I try to stay relaxed instead of inducing any type of tetany. I will give it a try this weekend, it is an interesting idea.
 

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Sorry guys, but I'm having some dfficulty in understanding any significant contrbution to core stability the anterior abdominal muscle group has during an archery shot .... could someone expand the details as to which muscles were talking about ... you can be as technical as you like.
Thanks
 

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Civil but Disobedient
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Phil, I cannot do the technical part justice without sitting down with my books to help paraphrase. What I have found, however, is a similarity between what I have been taught to do using the KSL method, and what my personal trainers have taught me about lifting. The positions are the same. The KSL method has you lower your rib case, tighten your abs, and imitate the "fat man", which is dropping into your pelvis and allowing your abs (stomach) to push forward (not a flattering position if you have a big gut). This puts you in a position where your core is now established as a stable connection between your lower and upper body. You can feel it if you do that little demonstration I provided in the top post.

Kayakers,

Yes, it was taking up kayaking a couple of years ago that also helped me better understand the use of the core muscles. I am heading back to a two day kayak school at the end of June.

Core training,

I have been hitting the core training really hard. I do the Les Mills CXWorx twice a week, sometimes three. I also do other core training as part of my regular workouts on other days. I have seen enough through various sports to really appreciate the importance of a strong core, and knowing how to use it. I wish I had this knowledge when I was climbing at my highest level. I am sure I could have gotten more power and explosiveness into my performance.
 

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I'm not sure about core flexing, but something I've been dabbling with is stance. The way most archers stand is not considered a strong stance in any other sport. For example in taekwondo they use the horse stance. Legs out and bent as if your straddling a horse. I guess it doesn't "look cool" but try to push one of those guys over sometime. :D wrestlers bend over more, but again obvious bent legs and butt low.
 

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I used to teach compound shooters to relax their stomach muscles & let them pooch out at full draw as it made you much more solid at anchor.
if you can use it when shooting trad, go for it.
 

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I used to teach compound shooters to relax their stomach muscles & let them pooch out at full draw as it made you much more solid at anchor.
if you can use it when shooting trad, go for it.
Martha, on AT said that too and the lady to point there's ....... to the sky.
Dan
 

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Civil but Disobedient
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I used to teach compound shooters to relax their stomach muscles & let them pooch out at full draw as it made you much more solid at anchor.
if you can use it when shooting trad, go for it.
KSL teaches pooching out but with the stomach muscles tensed. That is the fat man position I was referring to. I look much better doing it now that I have lost 50 pounds and my spare tire is gone. I had classic skinny persons fat. We get it around the middle where it is easy to hide with the right clothes. Both approaches cause you to settle into your pelvis. With KSL you are creating tension in your core since you are rotating your shoulders from an open stance, which keeping your hips fairly stationary. Much like generating coil in a golf swing.
 

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KSL teaches pooching out but with the stomach muscles tensed. That is the fat man position I was referring to. I look much better doing it now that I have lost 50 pounds and my spare tire is gone. I had classic skinny persons fat. We get it around the middle where it is easy to hide with the right clothes. Both approaches cause you to settle into your pelvis. With KSL you are creating tension in your core since you are rotating your shoulders from an open stance, which keeping your hips fairly stationary. Much like generating coil in a golf swing.
I think the tension your reference to is (Angular Movement).
KSL reference to this as tension after linear movement.
If I do it right I feel my body uncoil slightly after the shoot.
Dan
 
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