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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was wondering how much a twisted lower limb might throw an arrow off at 25 yrds? I know this is relative to how much twist is involved, just wondering what your subjective opinions might be. Got a Groves Spitfire takedown of my dad's who always strung it by stepping through and twisted the lower limb fairly bad. I'm taking up archery again since shooting with him as a kid (40 some years ago). Got a nice Groves from a good man here on Trad Talk to replace the limbs and have closed up my groups to about 8 inches. Just wondering your experience might be? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did. The first shoot following they went back to their old twist. Or perhaps I did not do it correctly. I clamped the bow down to a table, then hung weights along its length and used a blow drier to warm the limb. I used steel weights suspended in plastic grocery bags. Let it set overnight and the limb was perfectly straight - until I shot it.
 

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Sorry to hear that,,I always just use a heat gun at a good distance away and heat,,bend the opposite direction and then let cool.

I would not shoot crooked limbs at all.:sbrug:
 

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Well?....I just received a beautiful 1975 Herters Perfection Magnum that I grabbed for $200 about a month ago and was grinning ear too ear when I pulled it's massive one solid chunk of Honduran Rosewood risered self from the box it was shipped in...strung it up and the bow had two problems...

1. A 5/8ths positive Tiller and?..

2. A twisted upper limb where the string laid alongside of the string groove instead of in it.

Called my Bowyer and Friend Steve Jewett of Bushmen Longbows and an hour later?....it was in his vise....



sized things up?...



then handed me a dust mask and started sanding...on the strong side of the upper limb (to remove twist) and both sides of the lower limb...



to dial the tiller back into a respectable 3/8ths positive...



but as far as removing the twist out of the upper limb?...he switched back and forth between...

1. Sanding off the strong side edge and?...

2. Thermo-Mechanical manipulation which involved a heat gun, frozen dry rags and a wood wrench for twisting and holding tension.

he also found a slight discrepancy with the installation of the upper limbs string nock grooves...which he squared away with a few licks of a small round swiss file and got things lined up nicely...



the bow now shoots like a banshee...



hope that helps and L8R, Bill.
 

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I have been working on 2 old bows of my dads an old Grayling Bear Kodiak Magnum and a Grizzly. Both lower limbs were twisted pretty bad from sitting in his closet for about 30 years on the lower limb tip. It took me a couple of tries at straightening them with heat from my wife's hair dryer but both seem to be holding fine now. I had the most trouble with the grizzly. After the limb had cooled I strung it and left it that way for 2 days. Not sure if it helped or not but thought it was worth a try. I would keep working at it. Good luck.

Tim
 

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Sanding a limb on an old recurve to remove twist is completely unnecessary. You can straighten the limb with nothing more than a kitchen faucet and some time. Just torque the limb in the opposite direction of the twist, hold it there and run it under warm water (if it burns your skin, its too hot). After about 60 seconds, have someone slowly decrease the water temp until it runs cold. Hold it under the cold water for about 30 seconds or so. Remove the limb from the water, dry, string, check for straightness and repeat as needed. I have yet to find a wood/glass recurve that I couldn't straighten this way, including some that were prop twisted so bad they wouldn't even hold the string.
 

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Sanding a limb on an old recurve to remove twist is completely unnecessary. You can straighten the limb with nothing more than a kitchen faucet and some time. Just torque the limb in the opposite direction of the twist, hold it there and run it under warm water (if it burns your skin, its too hot). After about 60 seconds, have someone slowly decrease the water temp until it runs cold. Hold it under the cold water for about 30 seconds or so. Remove the limb from the water, dry, string, check for straightness and repeat as needed. I have yet to find a wood/glass recurve that I couldn't straighten this way, including some that were prop twisted so bad they wouldn't even hold the string.
Mr. Wesbrock?...I hope you're correct sir cause I'm about to test that out on my 1975 herters perfection magnum as apparently?...it wasn't quite "There" yet and appears to be getting just a touch worse...not by much but...about 1/2 the diameter of my Flemish braids appear as though they're wanting to climb up and out of the string groove and the limb is still visually twisted when strung....wish me luck...I'd hate to blow this beauty up but if I do?....

Trent...you still got that diablo? LOL!
 

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Bill, that old Herters is a beautiful bow. Hope you get it squared away. My shooting buddy owns a couple of them and he modifies the grips and shelves on them. They are excellent shooting bows, especially in his hands.
 

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Gentlefolk....as some of you may recall I bought this bow a little over a month ago from a young man in Indiana (who swore the limbs were straight and all was well with the bow) for $200...and an absolutely stunning bow with a massive Honduran rosewood riser but....after receiving it and stringing it up?...the upper limb had a nasty twist where the string wouldn't even register in the groove....so with my initial dreams shattered?...I called my bowyer bud Steve Jewett of Bushmen Longbows to see if he could fix it...and he wouldn't normally tackle a job like this...an old catalog bow with a twisted limb as he has much better and far more profitable work to be doing but...as a friend?...he spent about 4 hours working this bow an charged me $75 for the twisted limb work and made me up two brand new custom B50 strings for the bow...I gave him $120 and appreciated that he managed to get it into shoot-able condition and I myself spent about 3 of those 4 hours (on a Friday night after work deal till 8:30pm) aiding and lending a helping hand as he sanded, heated and twisted both the upper limb back into "good enough to get the string in the groove" condition and re-tiller the 5/8ths positive tiller down too 3/8ths....and considering the magnitude of the twist?...we were very pleased that we were able to get the string registering in the upper limb string groove again...even though it did still did favor one side of the groove just slightly...but Steve wanted me to shoot it like that for awhile just to see how the bow responded to all the work we had done thus far...but it looked good...now it's 2 weeks later and I took these following pix just an hour ago today...now I've shot the pee out of it and nothings moved and the string still registers just like it has...



and still favoring the right side of the groove by just a smidgen...



but it was two nights ago that as I was returning to my bow from retrieving arrows that I made the mistake of looking down and viewing this bow "Inline from a distance" and?...HOLY CHIT MAN!....



I didn't shoot it last night...I shot the bushmen....with the intent that I was waiting for my 3 day weekend here and I'm going to give this thing it's last chance...."The Hot Water Treatment"...and when I'm done?...It's either going to be a shooter or wall art! :lol:

Wish me luck folks! L8R, Bill.
 

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I'm thinking Mr. Wesbrock may be right...as it seems like I'm made a little progress with "Session #1" and took it from this....



too this...



enough so that it got the upper limb straight enough that I can see that the lower limb needs a little "Counter-Clockwise" action as well.

But I think it's salvageable. ;)
 

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out of curiosity i have twisted a limb crooked, but not enough to reverse the string, and shot the bow through a shooting machine. they pretty much just shot one hole in the paper. of course thats with a mechanical release.
one thing to remember. if a bow is old enough to be glued with hide glue, urac, it needs heat to straighten it. if the bow is glued with epoxy, any brand commonly used for archery bows, you do not need to apply heat.
epoxy has glue creep built into the product because it never sets to total hardness like urac did. you can bend any modern limb out of plane and it will stay there until you bend it back if it's glued with epoxy. thats why builders try to insist you use a stringer properly.
 

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when we had 3-m fiberglass we could glue it with urac and it made an almost bulletproof bow. when they pulled out of the archery market in the early sixties and gordon bo-tuff became the only viable glass for bows, we all had to switch to epoxy. we started with ren and at the time i left the industry we had been using only smooth-on for several years. we had a very sophisticated glue up process that measured the actual heat in the glue lines, so we could control the process to get the best cure possible for the type adhesive we used.
i would imagine that everyone was forced into epoxy by 1970 unless they were not using fiberglass.
 
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