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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. Hope you are all well and good. Spring will be here soon and you know the big birds will be strutting around soon.

Made a quick video of my process of making a solid turkey hunting arrow. Pretty straight forward and I hope it can help anyone with getting ready for spring turkey season with the bow.

This year I will be aiming for the neck as I feel most comfortable with that shot. Also reducing the fletching size this year I noticed an increase in speed over my previous 5” 3-fletch feather configuration. This should help with the birds lightning quick reaction time.

All is set up and as soon as spring is here I will be in the blind putting in the field testing so stay tuned.

Thanks everyone

https://youtu.be/WvGgRY4FX4M


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Spearhead
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How do you like the Easton 6.5, notice any difference from the beman shafts. Your the first I’ve seen using the 6.5, once my bemans are all gone I plan to go with the 6.5 as long as they didn’t change much, gpi and straightness is the same from what I see.
Nice video.

Chad
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How do you like the Easton 6.5, notice any difference from the beman shafts. Your the first I’ve seen using the 6.5, once my bemans are all gone I plan to go with the 6.5 as long as they didn’t change much, gpi and straightness is the same from what I see.
Nice video.

Chad
Thanks Chad appreciate the feedback. Yeah they are great arrows. Very durable. A standard diameter shaft that won’t let you down. Although I do shoot some smaller diameter arrows, I like these standard diameter arrows for small game and bird hunting. I can make them up easy enough and I don’t have to sink a fortune into components.


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Super curve shooter
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I shot the 6.5‘s for a few months actually probably about six or seven months. My experience was very different from yours. I found the shafts to be fairly brittle it seemed like. Hard to explain but I had a lot of them get damaged while shooting groups. Which of course is always a risk but with my axis arrows I have been pounding them into tight groups slapping them together for about a month now and just today slightly damaged one definitely still suitable though. With the 6.5‘s I would junk a couple shafts every time I would shoot it seemed like and I know a couple guys at my local shop reported the same. This was with 400 & 340 spine shafts. Could have just been a bad batch or something but at the end of it I could not wait to get back to axis shafts.
 

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Spearhead
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Jeff
Have you had experience with the beman bow hunter and hunter line of shafts, or was this you first experience with the 6.5
Trying to figure out if anything has changed.
I’ll just ty and give Easton a call and talk to someone if I remember on my days off.
I’ll start another thread instead of derailing this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I shot the 6.5‘s for a few months actually probably about six or seven months. My experience was very different from yours. I found the shafts to be fairly brittle it seemed like. Hard to explain but I had a lot of them get damaged while shooting groups. Which of course is always a risk but with my axis arrows I have been pounding them into tight groups slapping them together for about a month now and just today slightly damaged one definitely still suitable though. With the 6.5‘s I would junk a couple shafts every time I would shoot it seemed like and I know a couple guys at my local shop reported the same. This was with 400 & 340 spine shafts. Could have just been a bad batch or something but at the end of it I could not wait to get back to axis shafts.
I will keep this in mind. I imagine it is the arrows thinner sidewall that makes it more brittle than an axis. These are just bird arrows, if I break one no biggie. That was the purpose of using these standard diameter over my axis. Just was after an arrow that i could build easy and didn’t need after market components for. Turkey season I have been known to lose arrows lol.

Thanks for the feedback, really like the input. I will keep my head up for what you mentioned. Sounds like you have a sweet bow


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Super curve shooter
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Coodster-
No I have never had experience with the Beeman arrows but it was their legacy that made me so eager to try these. plus I was in the same boat as Madd bear just wanted a solid arrow that was easy to build with simple components. So I thought the 6.5’s would be perfect. Unfortunately they did not work so well for me.

Madd bear-
Like I said above I was in the exact same boat as you and really wanted to make these arrows work badly. I know I ended up cutting a bunch down for a compound shooting friend. But I may still have some of the worst ones laying around and could share some pictures tomorrow if anyone is interested. But it seems to me like the carbon would get bruised and then start to splinter rapidly, or it was just splinter from impacts that I did not think should cause that much damage. After a while I got tired of digging carbon splinters out of my hands and arrow rest, that’s when I switched back to the axis. Ever since I started using the genuine Easton half out I have been extremely pleased with the axis. The first time I tried them with ethics half outs the half outs would bend on me occasionally causing weird arrow flight. Then I switched to hits and actually they weren’t too bad but occasionally I would get some that would move, mostly with five minute epoxy. I had much better luck with low temp Hot melt like you buy from the hardware store. That’s what I use for all my inserts now. I hope this isn’t derailing your thread too much just trying to share opinions and gain knowledge from other peoples experiences. I also should say that the arrows did fly really well for me and I absolutely would have stayed with them if they were a little more durable for me. I used the .001 straightness series and the .003 straightness series.

Edited to add that I believe madd bear is absolutely correct in his statement about wall thickness and that is what most people at The shop/range I go to who the shared the same experience thought as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No worries brother. I am glad you are sharing all of this info with everyone. The more people know the better. This is the kind of tested reviews I like, from people who actually use the product.

I started going with a direct bond system with hot melt on all of my axis arrows over the 2 part epoxy. Didn’t like that I could not insert tune and that there was possibly an air pocket in the space between the insert and the BH shank. Not had any issues since switching.

Axis arrows are still my favourite right now. With the ironwill impact collars they are nearly indestructible


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Hey Madd Bear,

What's the story with the careful alignment of the tips to the shaft? You're clearly carefully marking based on weight in different areas, but how much difference does that actually make to your groups? Is this significant or subtle?

Thanks for the detailed video - it's very educational.

David
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hey Madd Bear,

What's the story with the careful alignment of the tips to the shaft? You're clearly carefully marking based on weight in different areas, but how much difference does that actually make to your groups? Is this significant or subtle?

Thanks for the detailed video - it's very educational.

David
Hi david
So the reason for that is because when I have the arrow on the arrow spinner, there is usually a spot when you rotate the insert that it will spin true. You would be surprised but say a quarter turn may make the arrow wobble. Rotating the insert and checking this spin alignment is something I have got in the habit of doing with all my arrows.

I want the straightest arrow possible. Any slight wobble tells me the arrow is not balanced properly. I could go on about concentricity and aerodynamics but I’ll refrain hahaha. Thanks for asking.


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I was kind of thinking this might be about your choice of broadheads. Personally I don't have any experience with the head shot. I like the idea of shooting through mesh, so for me they're out.

Pretty hard to beat a Snuffer and a string tracker. I set my decoys at 3 and 8 yards. Usually shoot at 12 because I can't wait any longer. Not a tough shot at 10 or 12 yards. They are hard to penetrate though. so that would be a plus for your set up, if you can get them at 10 or 12 without mesh. I really need the time to put down my reading material.

Bowmania
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I was kind of thinking this might be about your choice of broadheads. Personally I don't have any experience with the head shot. I like the idea of shooting through mesh, so for me they're out.

Pretty hard to beat a Snuffer and a string tracker. I set my decoys at 3 and 8 yards. Usually shoot at 12 because I can't wait any longer. Not a tough shot at 10 or 12 yards. They are hard to penetrate though. so that would be a plus for your set up, if you can get them at 10 or 12 without mesh. I really need the time to put down my reading material.

Bowmania
Yeah any good cut on contact broadhead would work. In the past zwickey deltas were plenty. Going to try this new set up this year. I would not recommend headshots unless you are 110% confident and a seasoned turkey hunter. Last year was able to get 4 birds, 3 in spring and 1 in the fall. I never tried shooting through mesh windows, I just conceal my ground blinds really well and create a lane that once they are in it I am already about to loose an arrow.

How do you like the string trackers? I thought about making a sort of string tracker/fishing reel combo for an arrow and taking it waterfowl hunting. I live along a big river and the ducks love it, the shotgunners go nuts around here.


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There's a couple of tricks to using a string tracker. You have to take 3 or 4 shots to make the string more free flowing. Don't worry about using up string there's plenty. I killed a nice 8 point buck in the pouring rain at a little over 20 yards, like 22. I aimed at the spot and then gave it a tad more height. I wouldn't shoot further. Out to 15 it's on the money. Also killed two bear and half doz turkeys. I wouldn't hunt turkeys without one.

I even used the tracker with wood arrows. Secured it to the shaft with electrical tap and it worked.

They even work when they don't. I shot a bear near some very thick poplars. A sapling every three inches. That caused a lot of tension on the string as the bear traveled and the string broke. By the time I got to were the string broke there was enough blood to follow the track.

I shot a turkey that ran/flied past a metal fence post. The friction on the post broke the string after about 40 feet. I couldn't find the bird at first and started to do a grid search. One pass and I found the string which had a turkey attached to the end.

Bowmania
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks bowmania.

Sounds like it has saved you a few headaches. If it is something I end up using I will know you turned me on to it haha. Thanks brother.


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