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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I recently purchased my first recurve (W&W Sebastian Flute Prostyle Right-Hand 24" Recurve Riser & W&W Sebastian Flute Prostyle "Long" Recurve Limbs @ 26#) with Easton Tribute xx75 1916's arrows (He installed some glue-in 75 Grain field points). My brace height is 8.75"

So I went to a pro shop and had my draw length measured and he cut my arrows to 29.5". He told me that the arrows may end up being too stiff for me. He might as well have been speaking Japanese cause I didn't understand what he meant.

So, here's is what I found out....if the arrow is too stiff then it will hit to the left, correct?

I haven't shot the arrows yet as he told me to wait a day for the glue to dry....

So I'm wondering; 1) if I purchased the correct arrows for my setup and if not what should I be shooting, instead? 2) Since I'm a real beginner does it really matter right now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I am also not sure my nock is fitting properly on these arrows and string (Stone Mountain DynaFLIGHT Recurve Bowstring from Lancaster Archery; 18 Strand, 68" AMO) the nock is really tight, and was wondering if I could gently file out the opening to make it fit better with the Easton Tribute xx75 1916's?
 

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A stiff arrow will impact left IF you are right handed.

Need to know your bow weight at your draw length.

Don't know of any glue that takes 24 hours to dry except 24 hr epoxy and he glued in your points with hot glue.

When it comes to proshops and trad archery take anything they tell you with a grain of salt.

Bowmania
 

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Bart Harmeling
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1916's not only will be too stiff, they will be heavy too. Safe enough, but the arrows will be slow and will drop quickly. If you were to use 1516's with 50gr points you would be shooting 10 grains per pound as compared to 14.5 grains per pound.

The string is overbuilt. A 12 or 14 strand string would give you better performance and your nocks would likely fit better. Yes, you can carefully file them, but it is best to get a string they will fit on. Keep in mind that there are different sizes of serving, so often you can use a different size to get your arrows to fit.

Here's a handy spine calculator you can use to check arrow combinations for your bow.

http://www.3riversarchery.com/spinecalculator.asp
 

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Bart Harmeling
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Or a 1716 left at 29". Play around with the calculator. Leave the shafts full length and see what point weigh you'll need. I'll post a screen shot of the calculator. I use 1/16" (0.0625) for your cut past center value and used a 14 strand string. You can see the spine is close, but the arrow is pretty heavy. There are several carbon shaft selections too. Might give some of them a try and see if you can get the weight down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Or a 1716 left at 29". Play around with the calculator. Leave the shafts full length and see what point weigh you'll need. I'll post a screen shot of the calculator. I use 1/16" (0.0625) for your cut past center value and used a 14 strand string. You can see the spine is close, but the arrow is pretty heavy. There are several carbon shaft selections too. Might give some of them a try and see if you can get the weight down.
That's excellent!! :thankyou:
 

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It is too bad they cut your arrows down, stiffening them. Left full length they might have worked well. They may still be sufficiently tuneable to be useable. Or your could install heavier screw in field points for little cost, to make your shafts bend more under acceleration. They will be heavier but that will not make a big difference out to 20 yards.

If your bow cannot be tuned to shoot them straight down the line you could put them aside. I presume you intend your light limbs to be trainers and expect to move up in draw weight later, as most of us do. The 1916s will be useful then.

If you get 1716s I would try some glue-in points similar to the ones you have now, to reduce the arrow weight by about 65 grains. You might gain enough arrow speed to make them flex enough, and changing points is not costly. With excellent posture and form you might another inch of draw length which would help. Then you would be drawing the arrow into the bow but perhaps not enough to fall off the rest.

But another option would be to go with 1816s left full length of 30.5". With glue-in bullet points and 3" feathers mine weigh 370 grains. I believe they would fly well from your bow and draw length. And they would accommodate an increased draw length- a good thing.

Re the nocks- if your arrows have the kind that press fit into a bushing they are the Easton G nocks. They come in two throat sizes: .088" and .098". You may have the smaller. It would cost little to get the bigger ones and switch. Get plenty as you will damage and lose some over time. You could call Lancaster's customer service and they should be able to switch you to a tech who could help you sort out what nocks would fit the string they sold you.

Kindly keep us informed of your progress. - lbg
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So, it just so happens that the 18 strand string I ordered was extra. The bow shipped with a 14 strand string. I could use that with 1816's @ 30", with RPS inserts (12gr) and RPS screw in points (125gr), which gives me this:

Bow - Dynamic Spine: 32.2
Arrow - Dynamic Spine 32.6
 
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