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I have a ~50# bow. Its what I mostly shoot. I can hold at draw for 20-25 seconds. And my main goal is to improve with this bow. I have improved a great deal with it over the last 4 months but Im still not what would be considered good.
I intend to keep shooting this bow the most for the foreseeable future.

When I try someone elses 30#bow though, its easy to shoot. Everything about it just goes well and feels better.

On the other hand I have a 65# bow that I can shoot with out snap shooting and I think I am maintaining form at least for 15 or 25 shots. But I can not shoot it near as well as my 50#.

Am I better off getting a 30# bow to practice my form or am I better off blank bailing with the 65# bow regularly in order to make my 50# feel lighter?
There probably isnt a set answer on this but how do some of you more experienced and better shooters feel about it?
Thanks.
 

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I do have a heavier bow that I use to help build strength, even heavier than my normal hunting weight bows, but there's no more than 7# difference between any of them. When I want/need 3D precision I go light, if hunting I'm middle of the road. While I'm easily "minute of deer" with the heavy bow I'm much more confident taking a shot through a hole in the brush at 20 yards with the middle weight.
 

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I've often wondered about this myself and have had several conversations with people from fellow archers to national level coaches about it.

My conclusions have been that if you're building strength, either to shoot more poundage or your current poundage for more arrows then some sensible training with a higher poundage bow could be beneficial.
One thing i did notice following this was my release became a little lazy at my regular poundage.

If you're working on form, recovering from or preventing an injury then a lighter poundage can help.
I also used a lighter bow to correct the aforementioned release problem leaving me to wonder if either had actually done me any good at all.

If your preparing for or close to competitions then i'd only shoot the set up i'm planning on using in that competition.

After all, we strive so hard to groove the feel of the shot it makes little sense to me to change that feeling by altering something as fundamental as bow weight.
I got away with it shooting Olympic recurve, I'm not convinced it would be as quick without a clicker though.
 

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AKA tracker12
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Just because you can draw a particular bow weight and hold for 15-20 seconds does not mean you can shoot that weight accurately with consistency. I am also do to believe you should use your bow for conditioning. Drawing and shooting a bow that is header than you can shoot will jus promote bad form. Get a nice 40# bow and concentrate on 2" groups at 20 yards.
 

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ryan brodrick
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If you can shoot the lighter biw more accurately then you're overbowed with the heavier bow.
Shoot a 300rnd and keep score. It will give you actual, verifiable data to reference.

Get a lighter bow. 30lbs is not too light. Strength probably isn't your primary issue.
 

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The classic weight for indoor targets and off season form work is 35#. There are many beautiful ones from the golden age available on the used market. I have owned a couple of dozen of them. I suggest you get a nice one and plan to shoot it all your life. You could greatly improve your form and fitness and carry that over to your hunting weight bows. - lbg
 
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