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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I tend to get a lot more fatigure in the shoulder of my bow arm than anywhere else. I think it is because I'm not achieving the much sought after power triangle. When I try to mimic what I think it should be I have to turn my head severly to see the target. I have long arms and narrow shoulders, so that may be contributing. Is there a resource somewhere of simple steps to consistently get into the power triangle position? This is probably posted somewhere else but couldn't find it. I read the post before with the diagrams but still am having difficulty. Thanks.

Seth
 

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Not sure I can help Seth, but I will tell you what has worked for me. I have long arms and wide shoulders, hence the near 33" draw. I find I have to get the alignment correct before I even get to full draw. If I try to draw into the power triangle I will not get there or if I do I can't stay there and begin to creep or collapse. The other thing that may be unique to me because of my low back problem is that I have to over draw slightly, exaggerating the position, then settle in to the proper alignment.

Not sure this will be of any help but I would recommend the business about getting the proper alignment first. How you get there is probably very individual.

Dave
 

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Seth,

I have a similar physique to yours, as you describe it. In line with Dave's suggestion of aligning prior to full draw, here's what works for me:

Try pre-drawing as you raise the bow - a long pre-draw that comes round and aligns the shoulder, rather than employing the arm muscles (though this will inevitably happen to some extent, too). The relatively short actual draw that follows after an almost symbolic pause then goes straight back in one line... well, probably not quite, but it feels that way.

To view this, search youtube for "Kisik Lee". In particular, there's a blond woman who does it well according to Coach Lee's method, but I've forgotten her name. There's also a guy called Jake who draws with the bow facing the ground. Ignore that variant, since I believe he has a special reason for doing it, an injury or something.

I'm on the road right now. Otherwise, I'd find the link for you.

One more tip: The pause between the pre-draw and draw should at first be a more pronounced one, until you have nailed the sequence well.

To find the Lee's description of the shot cycle in brief, go to the KSL website. Along with the clips, it will give you a rough idea.

Best,

Martin
 

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I'm just learning myself but,
My shoulder has not been given me problems since I did 2 things:
1. I dropped to some very light limbs 30 or 32#s at my draw. Before I did this I could not get a hold of my bow weight with my back. Now that I know what it feels like I am able to hold higher weights without using my shoulder.

2. I started anchoring further back. I shoot 3 under and put my first thumb nuckle in my jaw hinge pocket. I grab deep and my index finger (actually finger nail with my finger hooked around the string) buries into my last molar.
Anchoring further back is what I needed to do to get my elbow in line with the arrow. Before it was out at an angle which put added stress on my shoulder. With my elbow all the way back it is easier to engage my back and feel the weight transfer.

I used to dead hand release and pluck the string alot. I also used to slap the string on my face and forearem quite often. Now that my forearm is in line and my back muscles are working when I release my hand comes back naturally and the string moves in a straight line without hitting me on the way.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone. I think part of my issue is that I'm used to having my face totally parallel to the target, meaning I'm looking right at it. It seems to get the posture, I need to have my bow arm and shoulders inline so that I'm not holding my arm at an angle from my core (creating muscle strain) but more pushing the arm right back into the shoulder joint. To get this and also do my usual totally facing the target deal, I have to turn my head over my bow arm shoulder so hard, I feel like an owl. I was thinking this can't possibly be right. I'll start with the pre-draw but hope this is achievable without much bow arm movement. Ideally, I'd like to point the bow at the target with pre-draw and then come relatively straight back to anchor. I'll have to play around with this. Thanks again.

Seth
 

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ahshoot said:
Thanks everyone. I think part of my issue is that I'm used to having my face totally parallel to the target, meaning I'm looking right at it.
Hi Seth,

I've been at this for less than a year, so take it for what it's worth.

I normally shoot while wearing my sunglasses. The target image is pretty close to the inside edge of the frame. In fact, I use that for a check on my form. If it gets too close to the frame, I'm doing something wrong so I start over. I don't have the problem of it being too far away from the edge of the frame because my neck doesn't want to twist that far around. :)

Other people on the site have talked about glasses and needing to look over the bridge of their nose, so I think its pretty typical to not face the target directly.

Best of luck getting your form lined up so that you don't wear out your shoulders.

Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Ron. I wish I could wear contacts to make things more flexible but my blink reflex is too strong to stick things in my eye. I guess that's a good thing in a way!
 

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ahshoot said:
I'll start with the pre-draw...
Seth,

The pre-draw is part of the whole KSL shot cycle. It sounds as if the open stance may help you, too (with the head problem).

But in isolation, here's how I think of it:

Pre-draw: bringing the shoulder round (and in line)
Draw: pulling back

In reality, the draw and the expansion phase after it complete alignment. But the feeling is that 90% of shoulder alignment is accomplished via the pre-draw.

Best,

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It seems that the more open your stance the more you'll have to twist at the waist to achieve alignment. Once your above-the-waistness is aligned, it seems that the head turn is somewhat independent of your foot position. Does this sound reasonable? Should I feel tension in my waist while I turn, like I'm stretching in that area?
 

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Seth,

Starting out with a more natural head position before you twist above the hips, you tend to end up with a more comfortable one, too.

Yes, you feel some tension around the back hip and in the buttocks. To make this plain: you set torso aligment before raising the bow.

Take a light bow, if you have one, and practice Lee's shot cycle up to the end of the pre-draw - but after viewing the video clip (not just reading the site).

Best,

Martin
 
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