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I have been going back and forth trying to decide what my next set of limbs should be for weeks it's driving me nuts. Made me think it would be nice if there was a therapist on this site for some of us! :unsure: At times I have put so much thought into archery related things its scary.

While sifting through old threads about tuning someone wrote this and it cracked me up. Apparently he was having issues getting his bow tuned just right and he wrote:

"im afraid im going to be found in the far corner of my back yard sucking my thumb in fetal position before i get this bow tuned"

Funny Stuff! Just thought I'd share.
 

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Archery is so simple in reality but it becomes an obsession to focus on the few things that are variable. It definitely is maddening and fun at the same time. In kyudo there is a metaphor/ saying about how the goal of archery is not to shoot the target but to pierce the heart of the archer. I like that, and it does illustrate how we are refining our hearts and mind in the process. If, of course we dont lose our minds in the process
 

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I took up traditional archery because of what I presumed would be it’s simplicity. I’ve only been at it a few months but the one thing I’ve learned is there’s a seemingly infinite amount of variables and combinations. Some days I dwell too much on those things then other days I say screw it and just enjoy shooting the bow. I figure the details will sort themselves out in time and for now it’s more important just to enjoy the sport. I know one thing….I’m having a blast.
 

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hey there's an old prayer that is apropos for this thread = something like "God, grant me the serenity to know the things I can't change, the courage & strength to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference" or something like that.
I used to analyze the heck out of all this technical stuff, learned all I can, figgered what makes sense TO ME, and I try not to get too far out of bounds from "my niche" things.
After all, I shoot to please me, not to drive myself crazy(er).
 

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“. . . shoot and let the Gods figure it out . . .”

(saves an enormous amount of aggravation)

regard,

John
 

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I took up traditional archery because of what I presumed would be it’s simplicity. I’ve only been at it a few months but the one thing I’ve learned is there’s a seemingly infinite amount of variables and combinations. Some days I dwell too much on those things then other days I say screw it and just enjoy shooting the bow. I figure the details will sort themselves out in time and for now it’s more important just to enjoy the sport. I know one thing….I’m having a blast.
Agreed. Tuning can be as simple or complacated as you want to make it, and that can change day to day. It has a very user adjustable level of difficulty in that regard.

It may sound like heresy to some but most of the tuning can wait. New archers or new to traditional shooting archers are often much better off back burnering most of the tuning.

Get a shaft with a spine that’s in the ball park along with a ballpark weight field point, and leave the arrow uncut. Start with a serving string nocking point about a half inch over center and slide it down 1/16” at a time until your arrows start leaving the bow without being fletching high. Use a drop of glue to secure it in place. Then forget the rest of the tuning for awhile.

Just shoot and focus on the basics until you’ve developed good form and can consistently group arrows on the target with whatever aiming method you are most comfortable with.

Then once you’ve got yourself squared away with that bow, start worrying about whether the feathers are kicking left or right out of the bow. If you don’t have enough left or right to notice, you may decide you’re done at that point,

If you are right handed and they are kicking noticeably right, the spine is too stiff and you either need to add weight to the pointy end, or you need a softer arrow spined shaft, If they are kicking left, the spine is too soft. You can either switch to a lighter point or start shortening the arrow until they are flying straight.

If you plan to hunt with a particular broad head, use a field point of the same weight and then adjust the arrow length shorter to increase the spine. If you need to add weight to decrease the spine with that point weight either add weight behind the insert or in front of it.

I generally don’t bother free shafting until I‘ve adjusted shaft length and point weight, and then it’s more of a check than a tuning effort. If the shafts fly straight, it confirms that you are tuned and you can consider whether you want to go with shorter flatching feathers to reduce drag and flatten the trajectory a bit.

And of course you can then start increasing or decreasing brace height to play with noise, draw weight, and arrow speed - and potentially get into some arrow tuning issues again.

Or not.

Remember most bows will shoot good groups with field points even with an arrow kicking the fletching left. Where tuning really starts to matter is in hunting where the aerodynamic effects of the broad head are impacted by an out of tune arrow, and where penetration is greatly reduced if the shaft isn’t flying true.
 

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Agreed. Tuning can be as simple or complacated as you want to make it, and that can change day to day. It has a very user adjustable level of difficulty in that regard.

It may sound like heresy to some but most of the tuning can wait. New archers or new to traditional shooting archers are often much better off back burnering most of the tuning.

Get a shaft with a spine that’s in the ball park along with a ballpark weight field point, and leave the arrow uncut. Start with a serving string nocking point about a half inch over center and slide it down 1/16” at a time until your arrows start leaving the bow without being fletching high. Use a drop of glue to secure it in place. Then forget the rest of the tuning for awhile.

Just shoot and focus on the basics until you’ve developed good form and can consistently group arrows on the target with whatever aiming method you are most comfortable with.

Then once you’ve got yourself squared away with that bow, start worrying about whether the feathers are kicking left or right out of the bow. If you don’t have enough left or right to notice, you may decide you’re done at that point,

If you are right handed and they are kicking noticeably right, the spine is too stiff and you either need to add weight to the pointy end, or you need a softer arrow spined shaft, If they are kicking left, the spine is too soft. You can either switch to a lighter point or start shortening the arrow until they are flying straight.

If you plan to hunt with a particular broad head, use a field point of the same weight and then adjust the arrow length shorter to increase the spine. If you need to add weight to decrease the spine with that point weight either add weight behind the insert or in front of it.

I generally don’t bother free shafting until I‘ve adjusted shaft length and point weight, and then it’s more of a check than a tuning effort. If the shafts fly straight, it confirms that you are tuned and you can consider whether you want to go with shorter flatching feathers to reduce drag and flatten the trajectory a bit.

And of course you can then start increasing or decreasing brace height to play with noise, draw weight, and arrow speed - and potentially get into some arrow tuning issues again.

Or not.

Remember most bows will shoot good groups with field points even with an arrow kicking the fletching left. Where tuning really starts to matter is in hunting where the aerodynamic effects of the broad head are impacted by an out of tune arrow, and where penetration is greatly reduced if the shaft isn’t flying true.
Thank you for all that great information and I completely agree that new archers just need to be in the ballpark when starting out because inconsistent form makes trying to tune arrows impossible.

I got my longbow from Keegan at Omega bows and his arrow recommendation put me well within the ballpark. Optimal? Probably not but perfectly acceptable. About all I had to do was adjust the brace height and nock height. I’m still experimenting with nock height only because I started out 3 under, switched to split, and now I’m back to 3 under again since my groups are more consistent there and point on is closer and gaps are smaller.

I’ve got about 5000 arrows under my belt so far and shoot every day. My groups are getting better all the time with sub 3” at 10yds being normal with an occasional 1” 6 arrow group stacked as tight as you can get them. Started breaking too many nocks so now I shoot 6 separate spots instead of one.

I feel like my form is good enough to try fine tuning a bit so I’m gearing up for that. Bought a Bitz jig since I’ve beat my fletchings up pretty good and they’re ready to be replaced and also got a field point test kit to experiment with.

I like to tinker by nature so I enjoy the process but unfortunately I can be OCD at times so the process is never good enough and I have a tendency to constantly second guess myself. That can take the fun out of anything you do and that’s when I have to remind myself that I need just need to enjoy the moment and let the arrows fly. Once I get my brain out of the way everything works so much better.
 

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I have been going back and forth trying to decide what my next set of limbs should be for weeks it's driving me nuts. Made me think it would be nice if there was a therapist on this site for some of us! :unsure: At times I have put so much thought into archery related things its scary.

While sifting through old threads about tuning someone wrote this and it cracked me up. Apparently he was having issues getting his bow tuned just right and he wrote:

"im afraid im going to be found in the far corner of my back yard sucking my thumb in fetal position before i get this bow tuned"

Funny Stuff! Just thought I'd share.
I use to be that way about everything but then my world got so much better when I would educate myself on a subject and just settle for good enough and enjoy.
Life is all about balance.
 

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I am usually quick to make decisions on purchases because I base what I buy on requirements.

Requirements include functional, quality, price, delivery, customer service, warranty, aesthetics, country where manufactured, etc.

That usually narrows down the choices making the decision easier.

This even includes big purchases I have made like a house, cars, etc.

With more limbs available on the market today, it is likely you will end up with more than one option that meets your requirements.

Then it is a matter of revisiting the requirements for tie breakers. This could be price, lead time, seller, etc.

For example, out of all the limbs that meet your requirements you might choose lower price, in stock, from a seller with good customer service.

Or choose to go with the limbs that look the best. As long as they meet your requirements then that is okay.

This is how companies buy things.
 
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