Trad Talk Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,978 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this is a fried fish with tamerind sauce.
2 Servings, Prep Time: 20 Minutes, Total Time: 25 Minutes

2-4 chili peppers
3 sprigs cilantro Optional
1 fish
2 tablespoons fish sauce
2 cloves garlic
1 shallots
2 1/2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon tamarind paste

If you are making Fried Fish with Tamarind Sauce for kids or people who like less spicy food, use yellow and red bell pepper or any other peppers that are not hot. This dish should be great for non-spicy hot eaters.

In Thailand, they use pla gow or grouper for this dish, but any meaty white fish can be used for this recipe.
The Fish: Score the fish at an angle all the way to the bones on both sides to help it cook faster and crispier. Add oil to a wok or pan, about half a cup or at least to the side of the fish. Fry the fish on low heat if you like it very crispy, which I do. It should take about 10 minutes on the first side. Don't try to loosen the fish from the pan until it is done, otherwise, the fish breaks up and you end up with not so pretty fish. When the first side is cooked, flip the fish to fry the other side. It should take about 5 minutes on this side. Remove and set it on a plate. You can increase the crispiness of the fish by putting it in the oven on 350 until the sauce is ready.

The Sauce: While waiting for the fish to cook, peel garlic and shallot. Remove seeds and stem from the chili peppers. In Thailand, we use yellow and red peppers that are not available here. So I go for the color and use habanero (orange ones) and santa fe (yellow ones). Even with the seeds and white fluff removed, the heat can be on the top threshold of what I can handle. I recommend using one or two hot peppers. If you're not a big fan of very hot food, I would recommend red and yellow bell peppers. And this dish does not need to hot to be good.

Chop garlic, shallot and pepper or just put them in a food processor (coarsely chopped). Add a teaspoon of oil to a wok or pan over medium heat. Add the chopped mixture and stir to release the fragrance. If you are using hot peppers, make sure you have proper ventilation because the fumes can irritate your eyes, nose and throat. Add tamarind, fish sauce, sugar and a few tablespoons of water. Mix well and let boil. If the sauce gets too thick, add water. It should be the consistency of maple syrup when cooled. Taste and see if you need more sugar, tamarind, fish sauce or just water. The sauce should be sweet, spicy and sour. When done, pour the sauce over the fish and garnish with cilantro leaves if you like.

Sever hot with rice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,952 Posts
Sounds good, Larry. Could I substitute Sambal Oelek chili paste for the peppers?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,978 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it would change the flavors. best to use thai chilis you can get at any vietnam grocery or jalapenos, habeneros etc.. or just use green and red bells and add the sambal if you like that, when you eat it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,517 Posts
Another delicious recipe Larry ... I love tamarind
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,978 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
phil, heres another you and your wife may enjoy. even though it's chinese, i cook it whenever we have good fish to cook. original fish is grass carp that is starved for two days to take away the mud taste.
West Lake vinegar fish (Xi Hu Cu Yu) is one of the most famous dishes of the Zhejiang culinary tradition in eastern China. Fish poached and glazed with a sweet vinegar sauce, this dish is named after a large, beautiful lake in the city of Hangzhou.
2 servings
Ingredients
•Whole fish, grass carp, snapper, seabass or other white fish -- 1 (2-pound) fish
•Water -- 1 1/2 quarts
•Ginger, sliced thinly -- 4 to 5 slices
•Brown or white sugar -- 1/4 cup
•Black (Chinkiang) vinegar or cider vinegar -- 1/3 cup
•Soy sauce -- 2 tablespoons
•Rice wine or water -- 2 tablespoons
•Cornstarch -- 2 tablespoons
•Salt -- to taste

Method

1.Rinse the whole, cleaned fish in cold water and pat dry. Using a sharp knife, slice two or three diagonal cuts into the flesh on each side of the fish.
2.Add the water and ginger slices to a wok or pot large enough to hold the fish and bring to a slow simmer over medium-low flame. Lower the fish into the water and poach gently for 8 to 10 minutes, or until cooked through. Using slotted spoons, carefully remove the fish from the water. Place on a warm serving platter, pat dry and set aside.
3.Pour off all but about 1/2 cup of water from the wok or pot and remove the ginger slices. Add the sugar, vinegar and soy sauce and bring to a boil over medium flame, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Stir the cornstarch and rice wine or water to form a slurry and whisk enough of the slurry into the simmering sauce to thicken it lightly. Remove the sauce from heat and adjust seasoning with salt.
4.Pour the sauce over the fish and serve immediately. Diners remove pieces of fish from the platter using chopsticks.

Variations
•Marinate the fish in a little soy sauce and rice wine before poaching if you like.
•For an easier preparation, you can use 1 1/2 to 2 pounds of fish filets. But true xi hu cu yu is served whole. And if you are serving it for Chinese New Year, it must be whole. Serving it otherwise would be bad luck.
•Add a little minced garlic to the sauce if you like.

it's worth while sourcing the vinegar and using the wine. it's what makes the glazing sauce so tasty! the alcohol burns off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,517 Posts
Larry
thanks for your latest recipe ... I've found the vinegar ...http://www.wingyipstore.co.uk/p-8417-eb-chinkiang-vinegar.aspx

Larry could I ask you a question ... we have a huge Chinese / Asian supermarket about an hours drive away. Whenever we visit I always look at the dried/salted fish, but I never buy it as I don't know what to do with it ... any advice as to how to use / cook it ... thanks
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,978 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
phil, those are usually pretty pungent!!! some chinese use bits of them stirfried with rice. i don't use them at all. best to ask at the market. they can tell you how to use them or guide you to one that is packed in a jar with oil and much easier to use.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,978 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
odd i do not like those fish! i use prahok and/or kapi almost every day. both of them are best opened outside if you do not want your home to smell like roadkill. but, both add great flavor and no odor when they get hot in use.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top