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Bart Harmeling
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I prefer TD's for several reasons. I do travel so a TD is much easier to pack. TD's tend to have more mass and that helps my shooting. I also enjoy the option of changing limbs. And when it comes to TD's I prefer those risers that are compatible with ILF limbs, Not only does this provide a huge range of limbs to choose from, but ILF allows you to adjust tiller, and preload. So if you shoot split finger, 3 under, string walk you can set the tiller to meet your needs. Adjusting preload allows you to set the limbs to better match your draw length. ILF recurve limbs come in 3 standard lengths. There are also long bow limbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I prefer TD's for several reasons. I do travel so a TD is much easier to pack. TD's tend to have more mass and that helps my shooting. I also enjoy the option of changing limbs. And when it comes to TD's I prefer those risers that are compatible with ILF limbs, Not only does this provide a huge range of limbs to choose from, but ILF allows you to adjust tiller, and preload. So if you shoot split finger, 3 under, string walk you can set the tiller to meet your needs. Adjusting preload allows you to set the limbs to better match your draw length. ILF recurve limbs come in 3 standard lengths. There are also long bow limbs.
Would u recommend ant brand that is inexpensive??? That's quality to
 

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For me… Hands down it's the TD's! They offer versatility, travel far easier than a one piece and (IMO) provide the ability to grow with an archer. One can start at either end of the market and expand within your desire or means to do so. All the Best!

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For me… Hands down it's the TD's! They offer versatility, travel far easier than a one piece and (IMO) provide the ability to grow with an archer. One can start at either end of the market and expand within your desire or means to do so. All the Best!

Tom
I like the quality of a 1 piece though do u know of any high quality takedowns for a reasonable price thanks triston
 

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Bart Harmeling
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The Samick Sage is an excellent value for a bolt down recurve. Pete Ward has a nice review.

For ILF it is hard to beat a WARF riser and a set of good quality limbs. TradTech makes a line of ILF risers and limbs. I've owned a couple of those and they are good values. Hoyt sells the Excel riser which I have shot, but never owned. It is a nice riser. Lots to choose form. Right now I'm shooting a Warfed Hoyt TD3 riser with Dryad limbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Samick Sage is an excellent value for a bolt down recurve. Pete Ward has a nice review.

For ILF it is hard to beat a WARF riser and a set of good quality limbs. TradTech makes a line of ILF risers and limbs. I've owned a couple of those and they are good values. Hoyt sells the Excel riser which I have shot, but never owned. It is a nice riser. Lots to choose form. Right now I'm shooting a Warfed Hoyt TD3 riser with Dryad limbs.
I can VCR find them on the web can u point me out to some website thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Samick Sage is an excellent value for a bolt down recurve. Pete Ward has a nice review.

For ILF it is hard to beat a WARF riser and a set of good quality limbs. TradTech makes a line of ILF risers and limbs. I've owned a couple of those and they are good values. Hoyt sells the Excel riser which I have shot, but never owned. It is a nice riser. Lots to choose form. Right now I'm shooting a Warfed Hoyt TD3 riser with Dryad limbs.
Cant*
 

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I will be travelling up to the IBO shoot in Northern California with a 70 inch longbow in my small Nissan Sentra. I recline the passenger seat to make a space for the bow. Two piece would definitely be more convenient, but I really like the one piece. That being said, I will take ILF any day for my recurves. I have flown with a recurve in a airline legal case.
 

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I'll be pleasantly contrary and speak towards my favor of the one-piece.

If a takedown is necessary for whatever reason, there's no doubting the convenience.

The ILF takedowns are indeed infinitely adjustable. Mine is a jewel.

I prefer the one-piece recurves and longbows due to their light weight, ease of hoist, simplicity, and singular essence of purpose. Their "vibe" is coherent within their molecular connectivity from tip to tip. Their nature allows only one mechanical function.

I am attracted to, and love, all of this dearly, whether it be to my advantage or not.

Since all of my bows shoot far better than I ever will, I always defer to my sensory and aesthetic pleasures when reaching towards the rack for the bow "de jour ou un moment" (pardonnez mon Francais!).

Peruse your options, project your needs, imagine yourself shooting the potential candidates, and then procure the greatest archery pleasure your purse can withstand.

Good luck.
 

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If I only had one bow it would be a take-down. The versatility and travel convenience of the TD is tough to beat. If you like to hunt with a bow mounted quiver I think the TD offers a more solid mount by going under the limb bolts. I've used strap on quivers and they work but I prefer the bolt-on style.

Aside from the practical issues, I can say that my favorites bows are all one-piece recurves. I don't necessarily shoot them better, I just like them better. I think I might shoot my favorite TD just a bit better, the extra mass seems to settle things down with my shot.

There's just something about the sleek lines and simplicity of a good one piece bow to my eyes. I'm not sure of your budget, but if you want a nice one-piece recurve, custom made and at a relatively affordable cost, check out the Kota "Prairie Swift" recurve (http://www.kotabows.com/prairie_swift.htm). I don't own one but have seen them at a big traditional shoot and am always impressed by their build quality and value. Nice shooting bows too, but I've only tried a few demo shots.
 

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TD.

Better shooting, better travelling, more versatility.

-Grant
 

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I like the quality of a 1 piece though do u know of any high quality takedowns for a reasonable price thanks triston
You may like the looks of a one piece and even prefer it but a takedown bow is not any less well built or of less value… And, IMO far more valuable as it's versatility greatly exceeds that of a one piece. BUT… this is an individual sport, so enjoy it as YOU like.

As has been noted, The Sage or Martin's bows are just two examples of respectable TD's of modest cost.

Tom
 

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TD offers the new archer the advantage of starting with the proper weight limbs, then upgrading as their strength increases. All to often people new to archery buy a one piece that catches their eye in a poundage not conducive to learning proper form.
 

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For me, a take down is the only way to go. You can find a riser that fits your needs and is comfortable then get some limbs for it. Get a lite set for target and a heavier set for hunting. I just bought a Bear Black Bear compound for $25 and stripped the limbs off. Going to get Samick Sage limbs for about $75 new (cheaper if used) and mount to riser. Under $150 and a little work, you have a bow that a normal person can't outshoot.


Sent from my RM-915_nam_usa_228 using Tapatalk
 

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I think this has to be discussed factoring in the two faces of archery, the strictly target archer and the bowhunting archer, while acknowledging that there is a lot of cross over, and in-between, and both.

When was the last time you saw an Olympic archer shooting a onepiece bow in competition, or any other international competition for that matter, (Other than in matches that are specifically set aside for them--and thats almost always a longbow event).

While one-piece recurve bows are still made and used I'd posit that most are for bowhunters, and nostalgia/"traditional-oriented" archers. And I'm NOT saying that in a negative manner at all. I have and love to shoot a number of one-piece bows, both classic and modern made recurves and long bows. there are a couple new developments in modern recurves that are on my gotta-have list (IE: the Border horse-bow)

The 3 piece bow has some nearly overpowering arguments in its favor: Packability being a very significant one (Even longbows and some early recurves had very early 2 piece developments.)
However I think that the most significant force in driving the modern 3 piece
bow is the ability to interchange different sets of limbs using one handle/riser.

Early 3 piece hunting bows were sold based on portability for traveling bowhunters and for the option of carrying an extra set of limbs as a "back-up" in case of damage to the primary limbs. If you go back through old archery book and magazine accounts of hunting trips, or preparing for one, having a "back-up" bow was a real major concern. Limb damage was not uncommon and on a one-piece bow unless you had a back-up a long expensive trip could turn into a total waste of time and money. A set of replacement limbs was a valuable insurance. I have a couple old hunting bows that came with their sets of "back up limbs".

At some point extra limbs also became a way to get special purpose limbs of differing draw weights for various reasons as one's skill development and needs evolved.
As more or less standardized limb attachment systems have beed developed we have seen a movement toward mix-and-match buffet-style archery evolve over the past 10 or maybe 15 years.

Having one or two risers that really fit you well and that you are accustomed to and being able to add various shape and style limbs, of differing weights, lengths, design, material technology (as it evolves) and from different sources is a very powerful argument for the modern 3-piece interchangeable limb bow.

I have a number of different risers--wood and metal in different lengths and weights from short light (and short heavy) odd-the shelf and elevated rest, in wood and metal to meet almost any need. And there is a whole battery of limbs from classic-era to modern tech recurve and LB in weights from light training (and shoulder rehab) to heavy hunting weights I'll no longer be able to use any more.

I think that unless a new/young archer has a yen for tradition-driven bows the modern evolution of 3 piece bows is probably the most practical choice.
 
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All great points above. It's hard to beat the practicality of a good take down or ILF bow. However something about the light and lively feel of a one piece is addicting. For an all day spot and stalk hunt they are more comfortable to carry IMHO.
 
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