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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)
So I learned a lot from my very first stump shot in over twenty years:

Brown Table Wood Grey Black-and-white


Cheap carbon arrow with cheap faux judo tip hits rock. Cheap shaft survives, but working part of judo blows off (as did the nock.) 15 yard shot from 33# recurve. Pretty impressed by the cheap shafts. That was actually my chief concern in starting this thread: could carbon shafts handle impacts? Yep. This wasn't exactly a direct hit, but pretty close - the arrow bounded pretty high straight up in the air. Rock was protruding from the ground a couple feet in front of the leaf I'd aimed at, which was just sitting on the lawn.

In the photo, the tip on the left is what the one still attached to the shaft used to look like.

Shafts: https://www.amazon.com/ZHANYI-Hunti...ound/dp/B078MZZWFS?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1&psc=1

Tips: https://www.amazon.com/Jocoo-Archer...f=sr_1_7?keywords=Jocoo&qid=1663681710&sr=8-7

I can't say anything about these products other than that one blew up in, and the other survived, a rock encounter.
 

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So I learned a lot from my very first stump shot in over twenty years:

View attachment 39637

Cheap carbon arrow with cheap faux judo tip hits rock. Cheap shaft survives, but working part of judo blows off (as did the nock.) 15 yard shot from 33# recurve. Pretty impressed by the cheap shafts. That was actually my chief concern in starting this thread: could carbon shafts handle impacts? Yep. This wasn't exactly a direct hit, but pretty close - the arrow bounded pretty high straight up in the air. Rock was protruding from the ground a couple feet in front of the leaf I'd aimed at, which was just sitting on the lawn.

In the photo, the tip on the left is what the one still attached to the shaft used to look like.

Shafts: https://www.amazon.com/ZHANYI-Hunti...ound/dp/B078MZZWFS?ref_=ast_sto_dp&th=1&psc=1

Tips: https://www.amazon.com/Jocoo-Archer...f=sr_1_7?keywords=Jocoo&qid=1663681710&sr=8-7

I can't say anything about these products other than that one blew up in, and the other survived, a rock encounter.
Yep those things are useless. Not worth the money nor time. Better to get the real Judos.
 

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For stump shooting I break out my ash arrows. An ash shaft will take a heck of a beating. I've always just used field points. The arrows are bright blue and white. Unless you lose the arrow in a field of dead blue jays it is usually not hard to spot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Yep those things are useless. Not worth the money nor time. Better to get the real Judos.
Well, I took the next one out and it performed OK. A bunch of tough impacts and the springy arms help up just fine. No bending, which surprised me. The only negative was how much turf collected between the blunt point and the arms. This particular design, with a quite broad "point" leaves little space between the sides of the point and the spring arms, so it's hard to clean.

But yeah, next time I'll just buy real Judos, or try one of the other good ideas in this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
It's not only helpful, but very fun. When I was a kid, it was my main form of practice. If you like to walk through the woods, it's like one of your favorite things combined with another of your favorite things:) Hard to find that kind of combo in life.
 

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I use spot-and-stalk hunting techniques for mule deer and elk, and to keep my shooting sharp, I stump shoot as often as a target which won't destroy an arrow (mostly soft dirt patches or rotten logs in the country that I hunt) presents itself. My target shooting is always at it's sharpest immediately after the hunting season, which is powerful testimony to the practice value of stump shooting - in addition to how much fun it is.

The arrows I use are identical to my hunting arrows, but with plain field points instead of broadheads: GT Traditional XT 340 shafts with 150 grain inserts, 175 grain field points, 3-fletched with 3 brightly colored vanes. The cock vane is always fluorescent blue to match the markings on the shafts. The 2 hen vanes are part of a color coding scheme that I use to keep track of relative shaft spines: I measure the spines of all of my shafts, and sort them into 3 groups: Weak, Medium, and Stiff. To compensate for differences in spine, I cut the weak shafts a little shorter, and the stiff shafts a little longer. Then I color code using green nocks and green hen vanes for weak shafts, orange nocks and hen vanes for medium shafts, and red nocks and hen vanes for stiff shafts. I use 5 inch vanes for broadheads, and 4 inch vanes for field points - both target and stump arrows. My stump arrows are those which show big differences in spine between the stiffest and weakest planes of the arrow, or which are the least straight among my arrows. (The way I measure spines also provides insight into shaft straightness.)

Regarding points for stump shooting, I used aluminum shafts for all of my shooting until about 4 years ago, and found that if I used blunts or judos for stump shooting, glancing hits on trees, the ground, hard spots in rotting logs, etc resulted in too many bent shafts, and I was better off just stumping with field points. My carbons seem to resist glancing hit damage a lot better, but I am still using field points because 175 grain blunts, judos, and so forth are hard to come by.

One thing I've discovered in stump shooting with carbons is that quick bonding cyano-acrylic insert glues ("Super Glues") don't hold up well: It seems that one or two shots into something that's even a little bit hard breaks the bond, and then the next shot into anything results in either a shaft that has split from having the loose insert driven back into it, or a lost point and insert. Same result when I hit heavy bone on a deer. I've therefore gone to JB Weld epoxy: While it takes a less convenient 24 hours to achieve full bond strength, the extra setting time allows me to spin the shaft and rotate the insert to get the best alignment. Haven't shot epoxied inserts enough yet to say whether they will be significantly tougher, but JB Weld is pretty amazing stuff....
 
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