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i like this. tried it once to save lettuce that was aging and make it often now.

•1 tablespoon Shaoxing rice wine or dry sherry
•1 tablespoon soy sauce
•3/4 teaspoon sugar
•1/2 teaspoon salt
•2 tablespoons vegetable oil
•5 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
•1 pound hearts of romaine lettuce, cut crosswise into 1-inch-wide pieces
•1 teaspoon sesame oil (see note)

Preparation
Combine the rice wine or sherry, soy sauce, sugar, and salt in a small bowl.
Heat a 14-inch flat-bottomed wok over high heat until a bead of water vaporizes within 1 to 2 seconds of contact. Swirl in the vegetable oil, add the garlic, and stir-fry for 5 seconds. Add the lettuce and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes, or until it is just limp. Stir the sauce, swirl it into the wok, and stir-fry for 30 seconds to 1 minute more, or until the lettuce is just tender and still bright green. Remove from the heat, drizzle on the sesame oil, and serve.

Note: Use roasted or toasted sesame oil, not the neutral-tasting cold-pressed oil, and definitely not the hot, spicy version. Choose one made from pure roasted sesame seeds and not blended with other oils. i recommend the Kadoya brand. Sesame oil should be stored in the refrigerator, where it will keep for up to 1 year.
 

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Love stir fry. I use olive oil most of the time but if asked and you only had one off the shelf seasoning for stir fry, what would it be?
 

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"I never use the packaged or mixed "seasonings" for stir fry. Most of them contain unbelievable amounts of MSG.

My Chinese pantry has soy sauce, aji mirin (sweet rice wine), sesame oil, chicken stock and cornstarch.

These five ingredients, in various proportions, make up just about every sauce I make for Chinese dishes.

The soy goes into sauces for heavier foods and very lightly or not at all in sauces for light food.

I also play with black bean sauce, hoisin sauce, chili oil and ground white pepper for seasoning various other sauces."
 

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Stir Fry Seasoning Mix

Ingredients

1 tsp. Salt
1 tsp. Pepper
1 tsp. Garlic Powder
1 tsp. Onion Powder
1 tsp. Cajun Seasoning (Optional)
2 Shakes of Red Pepper Flakes (Optional)
2 tsp. Sugar
3 Tbsp. Soy Sauce
¼ Cup Water

Instructions

Start By Cooking Your Meat with Salt & Pepper
Add Veggies (I use 2 Bags total, One of Mixed Veggies and 1 Broccoli Florettes)
Combine All Ingredients Above in a Mixing Bowl
Pour Seasoning Mix over Veggies and Meat and Cook over Medium/High Heat for around 20 Minutes or until Veggies are done and Water has Evaporated from the mix.
Serve over Rice

WordPress Recipe Plugin by EasyRecipe
 

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15 Basic Stir-Fry Sauce Recipes

Instructions for all of these recipes … just combine the ingredients in a small bowl, stir well to combine, then add to your stir fry. Don't miss the tips at the bottom of the recipe list, as well.

Lemon Stir-Fry Sauce - Great with seafood stir fries, such as shrimp and/or scallops, as well as chicken.

1/2 cup lemon juice
2 tsp. lemon zest
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 Tbsp. soy sauce
1/4 cup sugar
• • •

Lemon Stir-Fry Sauce II - nice with chicken and seafood.

2/3 cup chicken broth
1 Tbsp. cornstarch
1 Tbsp. sugar
1 Tbsp. soy sauce
2 -3 tablespoons lemon juice (to taste)
Optional: red pepper flakes
• • •

Soy Sesame Stir-Fry Sauce - good all-round Asian sauce, suitable for all proteins.

1/2 cup chicken broth
1/2 cup soy sauce
4 tsp. rice wine vinegar
4 tsp. toasted sesame oil
2 tsp. hot red pepper flakes
2 tsp. sugar
• • •

Basic Stir-Fry Sauce - good all-round sauce.

2/3 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/3 cup rice wine or rice vinegar
3 1/2 Tbsp. sugar
1 Tbsp. sesame oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced ginger
2 Tbsp. cornstarch
• • •

Sweet and Sour Stir-Fry Sauce - great with chicken and pork.

1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup cider or rice wine vinegar
2 Tbsp. brown sugar
1 tsp. hot red pepper flakes
• • •

Sweet and Sour Stir-Fry Sauce II - great with chicken, pork, beef and shrimp.

1/2 cup ketchup
1/4 cup soy sauce
2 Tbsp. rice vinegar or cider vinegar
1 Tbsp. cornstarch
• • •

Sweet and Sour Stir-Fry Sauce III - great with chicken, pork, beef and shrimp.

1/2 cup white sugar
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup white vinegar
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup pineapple juice (or addition 1/4 cup water)
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup ketchup
2 Tbsp. cornstarch
• • •

Hot and Sour Stir-Fry Sauce - good all-round sauce.

1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup red or white wine vinegar
2 Tbsp. soy sauce
4 tsp. granulated sugar
1 tsp. chile paste (sambal oleek)
• • •

Thai Stir-Fry Sauce - great with chicken or shrimp.

2/3 cup coconut milk
1 Tbsp. fish sauce
3 1/2 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
1 1/2 Tbsp. soy sauce
1/3 to 1/2 tsp. dried crushed chili
2 1/2 tsp. brown sugar
• • •

Peanut Stir-Fry Sauce - perfect for noodles or chicken.

1/4 cup rice vinegar
1/4 cup soy sauce
4 tsp. granulated sugar (less if not using natural peanut butter)
4 tsp. natural peanut butter
2 Tbsp. water
2 teaspoons Asian chili garlic paste

Combine all ingredients and heat in microwave for 20-30 seconds.
• • •

Orange Stir-Fry Sauce - nice with chicken and pork.

3/4 orange juice
1 Tbsp. Cornstarch
2 Tbsp. Hoisin sauce
1 Tbsp. Oyster sauce
1 Tbsp. Rice vinegar
2 tsp. brown sugar
1 tsp. Finely grated orange zest
• • •

Orange Stir-Fry Sauce II - nice with chicken and pork.

1/2 cup orange juice
1/4 cup water
1/4 cup soy sauce
4 tsp. brown sugar
1 green onion, finely chopped
• • •

Spicy Orange Stir-Fry Sauce - great with chicken!

3/4 cup orange juice
3 Tbsp. soy sauce
1 Tbsp. cornstarch
2 tsp. finely grated orange peel
1/2 tsp. minced ginger
1 tsp. sesame oil
Large pinch of dried crushed red pepper, or to taste
• • •

Orange Sesame Szechuan Stir-Fry Sauce - nice with chicken.

1/2 cup chicken broth
1 Tbsp. rice vinegar or rice wine
1 Tbsp. soy sauce
1 tsp. grated orange zest
1 tsp. sesame seeds
1/2 tsp. sesame oil
1 fresh red chili, finely chopped or 1/2 tsp. red pepper flakes (or 1/2 tsp. sambal oleek)
• • •

Spicy Szechuan Stir-Fry Sauce - great all-round spicy stir fry sauce.

3-4 Tbsp. sodium-reduced soy sauce
2 Tbsp. rice wine or rice vinegar
2 tsp. cornstarch
1 tsp.sesame oil
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 Tbsp. sugar
1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 Tbsp. green onion, minced
1 Tbsp. fresh minced ginger
1 Tbsp. minced garlic
1 tsp. chili paste (sambal oleek or chili paste sauce with garlic)
• • •

Tips:

Some of these sauces already have cornstarch added but if they don't, you can use this to thicken any sauce that you think is too thin. Simply combine 1 Tbsp. cornstarch with 3 Tbsp. water and stir until the cornstarch is dissolved. Add a bit, stir and cook until sauce thickens. Add more as necessary.
Consider using low-sodium chicken broth and soy sauce to avoid an overly-salty finished dish.
Each of these sauces makes 1/2 - 1 cup of stir fry sauce. You may not need it all, depending on the amount of meat, noodles and/or vegetables you are stir frying. Add as necessary to make it as saucy as you like and thicken with the thickener above, if desired. Of course, you can also double the sauce if you're making a lot of stir fry.
Some of these sauces already contain things like minced garlic, ginger, onion or chilis (or other heat) but if they don't, be sure to consider adding some into your stir fry.
Everyone's tastes are different so you will likely want to tweak the sauces to your tastes. If you print out the list, you can simply make notes as you go to develop your perfect sauce.
 

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Nam Prik Pao (น้ำพริกเผา) is one of the most - if not the most - versatile composite ingredients in Thai cooking that I can think of. It is intense and complex, but not in an in-your-face kind of way; it also features pretty much all of the tastes associated with traditional Thai food sans the usual herbs. Each spoonful packs so much flavor, and a little goes a long way.

Believe me when I say that I hate telling people what to do or what not to do. But in this case, I consider familiarity with Nam Prik Pao and how to use it to be necessary for, you see, this condiment permeates modern Thai cuisine. If you're a Thai food enthusiast, or on your way to becoming one, and you haven't made an acquaintance with this ingredient, please allow me the pleasure of introducing to you Nam Prik Pao, the "secret arsenal" of Thai restaurants worldwide, a pantry staple in Thai households, and your new best friend.

What Is Nam Prik Pao?

There's no agreement as to the best English designation for Nam Prik Pao. Being a nam prik, it certainly belongs to the chili relish category along with the 105,896 other kinds of nam prik in the Thai cuisine. But it's also a condiment, used as a dip and a spread. It's consumed straight from the jar; it's also used as a cooking ingredient. Nam Prik Pao is, as I've said earlier, very versatile.

Nam Prik Pao is almost always referred to as roasted chili paste or chili paste in oil. Some call it chili jam or roasted chili jam which I think is more specific, less ambiguous, and more consistent with what it really is. While "roasted chili paste" is not wrong, I personally find it to be unclear. After all, I can give you a whole list of other kinds of Thai nam priks that can be called roasted chili paste that have no similarities to Nam Prik Pao and aren't used in the same manner. And chili paste in oil? It could refer to the roasted chili in oil condiment they put on the table for you at most Chinese restaurants, and we all know that kind of chili paste in oil is nothing like Nam Prik Pao.

Nam Prik Pao is jam-like in many ways. It's made out of the pulp and seeds of a fruit, chili. The fruit along with other ingredients are puréed and cooked down to jam-like consistency. It's also sweet in flavor. The seafood products in it may make some uncomfortable in calling Nam Prik Pao a jam. But whether or not the presence of seafood precludes something from being called a jam is debatable. For now, I consider it a savory jam until a good argument against it comes along.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
for years after i came back from s.e.asia there were no thai products available. then a lady opened a restaurant in montreal and within 2 years thai groceries spread across america. i was shopping in seattle and saw a lao sign for groceries and went in and saw the paste. i bought a jar and a loaf of vietnamese style french bread, grabbed a spoon off the counter, went outside and sat on the sidewalk and ate the whole jar on chunks of bread.
i still like it on bread. here are the ingredients that make up most of the taste.
20 long dried chilies, 6 tables spoon dried shrimp, 1/2 cup shallots (about 10 small shallots), 1/2 cup garlic (about 10 medium cloves), 7-8 Thin slices dried sand ginger, 4 tablespoon gabpi (fermented shrimp paste), roasted wrapped in aluminum foil or banana leaves until fragrant, 4 tablespoon fish sauce, 1/2 cup tamarind paste 2 tablespoon palm sugar. neutral taste oil for frying.
it's about 10% chili and has a background of sweet, sour, spicy, mild seafood taste from the shrimp and shrimp paste. gabpi (kapi) is very strong odored until you roast it. thats why you wrap in foil or your house will smell for months.
 

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I just love stir fry.

Ever tried stir fry prickly pear?
It's good stuff. :)
 

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Tell us about Rick? How do you do your stir fry? I love it too and I wish we had some stir fired rice build alongs going here because I love it too!
 
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