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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ever since my recurve was built for me 20+ years ago, I have shot the same way. I would play with it in spurts, recently becoming all that I want to do. I have always shot what I call my "default mode". Instinctive, not thinking about anything. No anchor point, no pointing, no release, no elevation, no grip, not thinking about anything. And I could hit whatever I looked at. I have always been extreme in that I would not dare shoot anothers bow, or even handle the grip for fear that it may cause me to think or change my internal sights. Now things have changed. I had a bowyer send me two bows to try. I knew this would mess me up... so, I thought, now would be a good time to try some other things. I'll reprogram later. So, I tried 3 under with my bow. I tried both new bows, split finger, 3 under, gapping, string walking, etc. 3 under tuned different so I had to go down a size in spine, so, I tried everything all over again. I shot every combination looking for the magic. Nothing, So now after deciding that I have a tournament this weekend, now this past weekend, I quit all the experiments, and try to go back to the way it was. I was all over the place. And due to my past split finger mental images, my present 3 under caused me to miss a couple targets. I don't know if I will ever get back. I watched all 4 Masters of the barebow and enjoyed it greatly, but now I'm thinking. I don't want to think. I'm thinking about my grip, my bow arm, back tension, my release, pointing my arrow, etc. And most of all, I'm shooting my worst groups ever. I have 2 choices, go all in.... or go back, never touch another bow and shoot a thousand arrows to retrain my mind. Choice number 1, I think I would buy a cheap recurve, under $200, about 30 lbs at my draw, and use it as a training aid to work on form, using a Rod Jenkins style of shooting. Then incorporate this style to my bow. Number 2, try my best to forget about everything, hope that a thousand arrows will reprogram my mental sights. Crossroads:sbrug:
 

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Give it a day or so an you'll be back in your old groove.
I don't shoot other people bows either.
Nothing extreme about that.

John.
 

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Archery is a mental game. Try shooting just a few arrows at a blank target butt. I also find that if I shoot close to the butt and keep my eyes closed, I become acutely aware of my release and form.
 

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1gr8… What you need is to read up on what the "bale" is, how to use it properly, and then get to reenforcing properly a good shot… One that is as consistent as you're able to reproduce… And it will get better and better by working it on the bale and holding to the fact that consistent repetitions are ALWAYS better than a lot of mediocre ones! all the best!

Tom
 

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Go for a solid, repeatable form. It won't be learned overnight. Just opinion based on my own experiences but I think that once your form is well ingrained you can pick up any bow within your weight capabilities and in short order be hitting reasonably well. When good form has been learned and reinforced by repetition it should be just a matter of learning the sight picture of the new rig. You may have to tune to your style, you might favor a particular rig because of the "feel factor", but you should still be reasonably accurate in short order.

The day before a tournament last year I changed everything but my glove and arm guard...bow, arrows, anchor...you name it. I spent the entire afternoon doing walk backs, probably shot 150 arrows, and won the tournament the next day...not my best score but a "W" none-the-less.
 

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I look at it this way. Olympic archers aren't snap shooting, flinging arrows, canting the bow, etc..... Why? Because they figured out that to be consistent enough to win a medal you have to have a trained, consistent, repeatable form. Works for them, and it has been working for me lately. At first, it is not easy. But it gets easier as you focus to repeat the shot the same way each and every time. I followed and still follow Rod Jenkins and Larry Yiens advice on MAsters of the Barebow volume 3.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Go for a solid, repeatable form. It won't be learned overnight. Just opinion based on my own experiences but I think that once your form is well ingrained you can pick up any bow within your weight capabilities and in short order be hitting reasonably well. When good form has been learned and reinforced by repetition it should be just a matter of learning the sight picture of the new rig. You may have to tune to your style, you might favor a particular rig because of the "feel factor", but you should still be reasonably accurate in short order.

The day before a tournament last year I changed everything but my glove and arm guard...bow, arrows, anchor...you name it. I spent the entire afternoon doing walk backs, probably shot 150 arrows, and won the tournament the next day...not my best score but a "W" none-the-less.
LOL, I shot my worst ever this weekend and won also. LOL, hardly no one showed up
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was just over at a bowyers house and he gave me some pointers. I have observed the checkbone/jawbone type anchors and assumed them not as good as the corner of my mouth. After having tried it with his lower poundage bow, I believe I assumed wrong. I was surprised at how well your thumb to pointer finger fit against your face. Problem is that the extra draw length has added weight that is beyond what I am used to. Especially if I want to focus on form. So, I need a lighter bow as a training aid
 

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My take is this....

I decided to relearn and have been at it for five years. It has been a long process. I had originally thought it would take about a year. So why do it? In my case, to learn more about shooting. I could have continued to improve shooting the way I was, but I saw how the Olympic style guys shot and thought I could apply that to barebow. So, even though I may not have had the big payoff yet on the scoreboard, I know a lot more about shooting than I did before. I find that interesting. It all depends on what you are looking for. I want to understand how it works. That is why I took the path that I did.

So now you have a choice. You appear to have achieved a high level of competency shooting your original style. Do you want to keep that up and reap the expected rewards, or try something new and see what surprises await? The latter takes a big commitment, including realizing that you could get really bad before you get better. The upside is a better understanding of shooting, and possibly a whole new level of accomplishments. It the classic fork in the road, take the well travelled path, or go somewhere you have never been before.
 
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