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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We all know that there are accuracy advantages to using a stabilizer and the correct arrow spine. This might be a theoretical question, but here goes:

Say I don't want to change anything about my arrow, i.e., the spine, length, point weight, etc., are fixed. And say that the arrows pass the bare shaft test. When I put on the stabilizer, the arrow acts stiff (as expected). Does the advantage of a stabilizer outweigh the too-stiff arrows?
 

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If you tune an arrow to shoot down the line that is too stiff.... that distance is the only distance it shoots the line. At other distances you will be adding the left or right. Fiddling the plunger, left or right with the sight or holding off.

So if you shoot fixed bulls eye distances it might work if your release is good. Too stiff arrows are not very forgiving.
 

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j-san = Jason
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I would think that can depend on how stiff the arrows behave with the stabilizer and how much of an improvement the stabilizer is for your shooting. If the stab greatly improves your consistency, then a little stiffer arrows shouldn't be a problem so long as you can compensate for them consistently.
 

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The Mad Scientist
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I'm not sure how a stab affects arrow frequency or speed (the variables affecting spine), so maybe it's really a clearance issue? All a stab does is keep the riser from twisting so the actual arrow spine shouldn't change, right? However it might affect the string frequency and thus the location where the nock separates from the string? That will show up in a bare shaft test.
 

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Keep the stab and retune.

-Grant
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the responses, but I think my question might have been too much on the theoretical/opinion side. Yes, I agree the best thing to do is to keep the stab and retune, but my premise was to keep the arrow as it is and wonder if the advantage of the stab outweighs the stiffening influence of the stab. Since retuning is the obvious thing to do, my question probably has no practical application. That's what happens when one has been unable to shoot outdoors for months - he ponders such useless things. Itching to get outside and do some real shooting instead pondering trivial stuff.
 

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I don't think your question is overly theoretical, but in real lie there would be many variables at play amoungst unique setups. However, to answer your question, I think the tuned arrow without a stab trumps the stab and untuned arrows. Indoors may be the only round that it would be a toss up with. I actually experienced this with the first indoor shoot of the season this year. I had a bow tuned and shooting well that was setup for fita barebow, but got my hands on a 12" stab the night before so I took it to the shoot the next morning and shot both setups side by side. In the end I shot without the stabilizer as it seemed like the most forgiving option.
 

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Mat,
I'm so glad I'm not the only one whose mind got totally derailed by that legitimate response that sounded like a quote straight out of a blue movie! Guess I spent too much time at the drive-in watching low-budget ones in my younger days. And no, for those of you who don't know what a "drive-in" is, I'm not going to elaborate.... it's a geezer thing!
 

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MAT keep in mind that at this point this only the most popular theory that I have heard to date. I have yet to see any solid data to confirm it.

First off, with the addition of a stab, no the arrow does not change. Rather its dynamic behavior upon release changes. And its not so much that you have a stabilizer, rather simply that you have added significant mass to the riser. The higher mass means higher inertia to resist the lateral force applied by the arrow to the riser when the initial arrow flex is generated by the release. (Remember that first bend could not be initiated at all unless the arrow is also being forced against the riser and the riser is resisting it.)This causes the arrow to behave as if it is stiffer when exiting the bow.

Currently just a theory. But the effect is quite real, whatever its actual cause.

OK and Arcus, I have a better idea of the nature of the question now. :) And yes, I would have to go with tuned trumps just adding a stab. I've seen too many who thought they could just throw the stab on and call it good. Usually not pretty. Unless you're shooting short yardage with huge fletch. You can get away with a lot of crap that way, but it will usually turn out to be rather unforgiving if you're looking for a high level of precision/accuracy, say like at an Indoor tournament.
 
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