Trad Talk Forums banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone put a layer of foam or similar behind whatever material they use for a side plate on cut-past-center risers when setting up for shooting off the shelf?

I'm thinking that some foam would allow some give, and some of the foregiveness of a plunger button, when shooting off the shelf. With risers cut well past center, we have to build out quite far anyway, so there is room to get fancy with the material we're using to build out with.

Obviously, we wouldn't have the same adjustability of tune as with a real plunger, but maybe some of the same forgivenesss to imperfect releases, etc. could be attained with this type of method?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
You can tune to some degree with a spongy side plate when you want a specific arrow which otherwise is not tuned for your bow. But again, you can't tune better than you shoot and theory will always had a hard fall when skills are not up to the task.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Personally I don't understand "forgiveness". I've shot enough to understand that a strong bowhand can counter somehow for a "bad" release and the single reason I am bareshafting is to reduce the space between a good executed shot and a slightly imperfect executed shot. But a bad executed shot it is a bad executed shot and the "forgiveness" is just a pat on your shoulder saying to yourself that the arrow could have been 4 instead 6. But in reality both are a miss.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
I think it would be very difficult to find just the right amount of sponginess in a piece of foam, let alone a foam that would hold up shot after shot. As far as forgiveness goes, here's an article from Vic Berger, January 1974 Archery World:
"A properly adjusted button absorbs the pressure of string oscillation and thus allows the arrow to leave the bow in perfect flight. The added pressure caused by a bad release is cushioned by the button. The plunger compresses a bit more when it absorbs the added tension and causes the arrow to strike much closer to where it is aimed."

Thus, the plunger spring offers some 'forgiveness' in that it makes a good shot good, and a bad shot less bad.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I may try it. Thanks. I bought a 17" Black Wolf riser recently and mean to shoot it off the shelf, mainly because I want to preserve as much sight window as possible. It's cut far past center, and I put a 1" round felt furniture pad on as a rough and ready plate, but I probably have 1/8" more to add to get the arrow tip left of the string. So, since I have to add a little more something anyway, I'll try a little foam.

BTW, you fellas have probably already seen this, but I found this video fascinating:

It's all about tune, not "forgiveness", but still a bit on topic.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
421 Posts
I remember that bit from Vic Berger, back in the day, a chunky release causing string wobble was often discussed. With those light weight target bows with thin tips it was a very real thing. It is also a variable that can be dealt with by the shooter. With stiffer ASLs a strong bow hand, as long as the grip is not torquing, with a smooth release, there can be much less string oscillation. As I witnessed in slo mo of my own heavy bows, there was virtually none. A deep hard release with a heavy glove versus a smooth release with a Kantpinch with my wife's light recurve, had the string going everywhere. I have seen people messing with button tensions, open up a surprise can of hard to explain worms. Everything relies on the shooter tuning himself first.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I remember that bit from Vic Berger, back in the day, a chunky release causing string wobble was often discussed. With those light weight target bows with thin tips it was a very real thing. It is also a variable that can be dealt with by the shooter. With stiffer ASLs a strong bow hand, as long as the grip is not torquing, with a smooth release, there can be much less string oscillation. As I witnessed in slo mo of my own heavy bows, there was virtually none. A deep hard release with a heavy glove versus a smooth release with a Kantpinch with my wife's light recurve, had the string going everywhere. I have seen people messing with button tensions, open up a surprise can of hard to explain worms. Everything relies on the shooter tuning himself first.
And, keeping it real, that's where I'm really at right now.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
I use felt furniture pads, they are about 1"-1.5" or so round so I use one half for the bottom and the other for the side. They give just enough squish and build you out just about right with cut-past-center metal risers.

Tire Automotive tire Wood Font Synthetic rubber
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
You dont put the spongy material behind the plate - you put it in front of the plate.
Its common to use some furniture pad material on the plate for the arrows to rest against.

As to "forgivness" where is how it works.
If you have the arrow against a solid hard surface its possible that if you execute a bad release the arrow may bounce off the surface the hard surface applifies the problem. By using a "spongy" surface it dampens that effect. Your bad release will still result in a poor shot, but while a hard surface can make the problem worse a soft surface can partially mitigate it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,603 Posts
I use felt furniture pads, they are about 1"-1.5" or so round so I use one half for the bottom and the other for the side. They give just enough squish and build you out just about right with cut-past-center metal risers.

View attachment 40938
I use these on one metal 17" riser cut annoyingly far past center. Pretty dense, not much bounce or forgiveness. I don't build shelf or strike plate for forgiveness though, just work with what the bareshaft tells me about the bow and my form. My favourite shelf & strike plate setups are just velcro on the riser, little mercy. Keeps me in shape.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
Yes, it can to degree. That is why organizations have rules against building out strike plates in classes that shoot only off the shelf. If you have metal cut past center riser, why would you not simply use a plunger and rest like it was designed for?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
Does anyone put a layer of foam or similar behind whatever material they use for a side plate on cut-past-center risers when setting up for shooting off the shelf?

I'm thinking that some foam would allow some give, and some of the foregiveness of a plunger button, when shooting off the shelf. With risers cut well past center, we have to build out quite far anyway, so there is room to get fancy with the material we're using to build out with.

Obviously, we wouldn't have the same adjustability of tune as with a real plunger, but maybe some of the same forgivenesss to imperfect releases, etc. could be attained with this type of method?
yes it does what your thinking it does, I’ve done it on a DX5 riser, worked fine…just layer 3M double sided tape with a piece of Velcro on it…can remember how many o hand layered..4 maybe…
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,603 Posts
If you have metal cut past center riser, why would you not simply use a plunger and rest like it was designed for?
I don't compete with metal risers, solely hunt with them. Only interested in the WA Traditional division, which means wood riser. Rests and plungers are a liability in jungle or very dense undergrowth for ground hunting, too fragile and more to catch on grasses, thick brush and vines. I Keep It Simple Stupid with a shelf, even if I lose a little speed and some forgiveness.

My F261 (EXE Scream) has a really neat addon radiused shelf made from alu affixed using a bolt through the plunger bushing hole. Built for hunters.

For ground hunting in easy open forest or from a tree stand, it makes sense to use a quality rest and plunger as desired.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top