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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've been playing with spring weights in my Beiter. I've got two options that bareshaft well for me - a stiff spring set close to center and a softer spring set a little further from center.



I really thought that the soft set up would be more forgiving but, after shooting it this weekend on a 3D course I'm leaning towards the stiffer set up. I shot a good score with about 40% of my shots being 11's but, if I made a bad shot it wasn't a 10 it was an 8 - even on shots that I didn't think were executed that poorly.



What has been your experience??



Matt
 

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Matt,

I have gone through the same process with the same limb and arrow package I believe you are using. I ended up with three different set-ups that all tuned and worked reasonably well. I actually used all three set-ups in a scored trial (50 shots each X 3) on a 40 cm target from 25 yards. Statistically, the stiffer spring, with more centershot, and a slighly stiff and low (7 o'clock in the red) resultant bareshaft was better by two importants factors. The arrows had a higher average score, and the variation in score was smaller.

Mark
 

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Matt,

I have heard both. I had a coach that was a very meticulous tuner. He felt that the perfect tune required very little plunger. I don't agree with that. I think a bad release with a weak plunger can ground the plunger string and cause your arrow to bounce off the riser. My ACE's and ACG's tune fairly soft. My problem is that I am between the soft spring and the medium spring. I have to keep changing springs and sometimes I do not have room for adjustment in the field. I would like to get my spring a little stiffer. Mid point of the medium spring would be good. Mid point is good when you are stringwalking. It gives you a lot of room to adjust for different crawls. I should let it be known that I never lock down my plunger. I will make adjustments to move my arrows to the center line.
 

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I agree. Then you could shoot the bow with a shooting machine and get a baseline.

Or one that is progressive.
Dan
I'd expect that any plunger spring would be manufactured to an SAE standard. Get that spec and it would be a straightforward bit of math to figure load per given % of compression (length). There are probably even tables to be found in a machinist's handbook somewhere. If you wanted to take it that far.

Regards,

Salskov
 

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I wish someone made a plunger "resistance meter". It would be interesting to know what tension others shoot.
There is one. I bought mine at Quicks Archery in the UK. It is the only place I could find that carries it mail order. I found out about it from a post of Greysides a few years ago. You set it to save your plunger tension and center shot. I does not give you an actual poundage. I was thinking of calibrating mine with a scale to get real poundage's. It is made by AGF. I am posting some pictures.

The bonus question, can anybody identify the weights holding down the left and right side of the instruction manual?



 

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Hank I have been entertaining the idea of using a pressure transducer. Use them all the time at work.
Dan
I have thought about using transducers (linear, pressure, etc.) for various things. I just don't have access to the equipment any longer. What do you need and what do you think it would cost to put it together myself? I have Googled before. I just need a better idea what to buy since I end up in industrial supply sites. I need the equipment to read the sensors unless they come self contained.
 

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I have thought about using transducers (linear, pressure, etc.) for various things. I just don't have access to the equipment any longer. What do you need and what do you think it would cost to put it together myself? I have Googled before. I just need a better idea what to buy since I end up in industrial supply sites. I need the equipment to read the sensors unless they come self contained.
Hank, that funny. I have the transmitter setting on my work bench at work.
Interfacing it is all I need. One problem, deflection. I receive the data thru a receiver and log into a excel spreadsheet. 0-3000 psi
Dan
 

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Home labs are difficult and expensive to put together. Many years ago I used to write software to interface tranducers to computers for data collection.
 

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Lots of force gauges and programs for them out there but the problem is price.
Like a new top end riser price and you'd still have to make custom fixtures.

20 odd years ago the wife got a digital kitchen scale (cost $129 as I recall).
I made a "[" shaped (saw horse) fixture out of 1x4 to fit over it. Glued a plunger bushing in the top and threaded the plunger down onto the scale. Measured the grams at 1 thread intervals.

Worked fine, confirmed my suspicion that just because the springs looked the same didn't mean they were.

Today you can buy a 1000 gram a digital pocket scale for $10-$20. Find a piece of channel aluminum that fits over it. Tap a hole to fit your plunger and have a decent piece of bench test equipment. As small as those scales are with a little imagineering it wouldn't be too tough to come up with a fixture that would work on the bow.
 
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