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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I'm not intending on shooting broadheads with my current set up, and the bow is set up for center shot (Hoyt Game Master 2 with furniture pads) - does it really matter if my arrows are too stiff?

What is the down range impact? As far as using field points on targets are concerned...

Does it really matter that much?

Thanks,
Daniel.
 

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If they are to stiff the left/right error will become more pronounced and harder to compensate for as the distance increases.
You can also get into the trap of not really knowing if what your seeing at the target is a result of the arrow being slightly incorrect or an indication of shooting form.
Ideally we want everything spot on and in tune so we always know that what we see is a result of either good or poor form, not as a result of an equipment issue that we could do something about.
So to me the bottom line is that it is important even though some error can be compensated for.
Another issue if your a hunter and your not getting perfect arrow flight,is it can cost you in penetration and all the issues that can arise from that.
How to tune out some degree of spine error short of replacing the shaft altogether is another question again.

John.
 

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IF they're flying well… IF they strike the target where you want them to… AND maybe you've even gone to the trouble to bare shaft or paper test them and all's right with the world….. Then they're just right and NOT STIFF…. and ultimately…only "Hitting" counts.:):):)

Tom
 

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In an extreme case too stiff bare shafts will show a false weak as the nock end either bounces off the riser or simply sails left as the arrow leaves the bow (RH archer) the arrow then planes to the right at the target in a big fish tail. It is still possible to tune for a too stiff arrow but the nocks will still point left while impacting right.

Your whole shooting experience will be better if your arrows are the correct spine and the bow properly tuned.

Rasyad
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm shooting full length GT Velocity Hunters 600 Spine with 100 grain points and according to Stu Miller's calculator, well stiff at my current draw 23# @ 27.5" with this setup.

I got ahead of myself and fletched all the shafts - so haven't bareshafted yet. Flight seems fine to me (though I'm a newbie), and arrows seem to hit roughly where I look... if anything lands to the RIGHT but I suspect thats an aiming error not a bow issue. (I'm going to try gapping and see if that's still the case.)

I can understand getting the right spine where the shaft needs to bend around the riser, but on centershot, is it as important? For now, with my current skill level and form... it doesn't seem to make a difference.

(I will be bare shafting when I get back after work travel... though not expecting any surprises.. will be stiff!!)
 

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Daniel,

Those 600s are quite stiff for a 23# bow by many magnitudes. Flight can be erratic and differ from shot to shot. In addition, an arrow can shoot right, left, high, or low simply due to your own technique in spite of the arrow's stiffness or weakness.

New archers should not concern themselves with formal tuning or bare shafting. You can only tune as well as you can shoot, so the secret is to obtain arrows that are well-matched to your bow (recommendations on this forum, for instance, or from a trusted recurve dealer) and simply learn to shoot over the next several months. Now you can focus solely upon technique without sweating your equipment.

Once you've crossed the initial learning curve and your technique is fairly consistent with recognizable groups on the target, then you can begin exploring formal tuning to your advantage. This is a "horse before the cart" scenario, for sure.

Since even a centershot setup will still find the shaft bending in paradox as it clears the riser, yes ... matching the correct arrow to the bow will allow for proper riser clearance as well as great flight to the mark, and the correct arrow here is every bit as important as it would be for non-centershot situations. It's still "rocket science" no matter the setup!

If you don't have a coach, order a copy of Camera's "Shooting the Stickbow", which covers "the all" of basic and advanced archery technique, equipment tuning, arrows, strings, aiming, etc. It's an inexpensive and vast book that may be of great assistance if you are self-taught.

Good luck.
 

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Yup, those arrows are much too stiff, and too heavy. You have no chance for good results with those. - lbg
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the feedback. Actually if I change to a 125gr point, its actually pretty close at least according to Stu Miller's calc. With the 100gr points, its a perfect fit for my Martin Hunter @ 28#.

600 Spine GT Velocity's are only 5.7gr per inch... pretty light stuff.

I will do some experimentation (and yes, I've ordered Anthony's book... the other books I had did not get into detailed tuning.)
 

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I read somewhere (doesn't make it true, I know!) that at low poundages spine is almost irrelevant, unless you go to -extremely- soft arrows. Aluminum shafts are a good inexpensive way to experiment with spine difference, unless your focus is on low arrow weight & long range.

Daniel, Tony's book will serve you very well. Great choice.
 

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Yes, the archer's paradox still applies to a center shot arrow. It occurs for finger shooters as a result of the string rolling off the fingers. Using a mechanical release mitigates that, which is why compounds are center shot.

I think we do not usually worry about too stiff arrows with beginners because we are more focused on shot cycle and technique. It is difficult to get a bunch of archers in a class all tuned on class equipment.

A dramatically stiff arrow can show extreme fishtailing, which makes the point of impact vary quite a bit by distance, depending on where in the wobble cycle the arrow is. It can also sometimes hit the riser. I have a neat demo where I shoot an aluminum compound arrow out of my longbow and you can hear a distinct "clank!" when it hits the riser.

I would not worry about it for now. Just work on your form and shot cycle, and build muscle memory. It won't matter much at 10 yards. You might be able to get a tune on them with much heavier points, but may find that the arrow becomes too heavy (slow out of the bow) and nose dives due to the high FOC. But this is OK, you can experiment and learn - it is part of the fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I actually changed the points from 100gr to 125gr, and based on Stu Miller's calcs it puts it within 3lbs of dynamic spine (arrow slightly stiff) which is pretty close.

I haven't bareshafted yet, but the obvious difference is the way the arrows with 125gr points are flying much straighter and sticking out of the target straighter.

So it does make a difference :)

Thanks for all the feedback and tips. I think I tried the 125gr previously, but my form at the time probably made little difference whereas now its better.
 

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Daniel, just shoot the bow and have fun. Those calculators work for some, not for all. Same with setting up on center shot, that doesn't work for everybody. If you desire to learn how to tune, Read/shoot/enjoy/repeat. "Tuning for tens" is very helpful. In the end, don't overthink it. What I mean is don't be confused by what the charts/calculators/others say, shoot what tunes for you! 3rivers has an assortment pack of 5/16" field points, so you can mess with tuning and FOC.
 
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