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赛
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The last storm - which was a doozie - took out my satellite/Internet dish and also did its best to destroy the NW and SW corners of the barn (along with a laundry list of other stuff that got ripped up). So. Barn framing and siding reinforced/replaced, sat dish up and running, and most of the laundry list pieced back together. . .

Where I'd left off with my tab, I'd confirmed that ballistic nylon was a great working surface and that the two-loop finger sling was the only way to go. However, there were some improvements to be made. In no particular order, here's what went into Gen II of the Slicker'n:
1.) Gen I was made by gluing the ballistic nylon directly to the leather, and was relatively thin. I found that it got very hard on the fingers after a couple hours of shooting. Furthermore, though the tab took an angled "set" for the hook of the bowstring, there really wasn't the kind of defined groove I'd wanted. I changed this by adding a 2mm layer of dense synthetic felt between the ballistic nylon facing and the leather backing. Given that I now had a 3 layer lamination I also upgraded my adhesive from Barge Cement to some really intense (and expensive) stuff I use for applications that gotta be 100% bulletproof. It maintains its full bond from -30 deg. C to +130 deg. C and I had proven via previous destruction tests that the parent material on either side of the glueline failed before the glueline did. The resulting thickness of leather/felt/nylon was 4.5mm. Here's a pic of a scrap piece -



The result was what I'd hoped for; a nice string groove developed in about the first 50 shots from the compression of the felt along that line in addition to the tip ends of the tab setting into a smooth hook. And it was way easier on the fingers; that 2mm of Cush was just enough.

2.). Another thing that got hard on the fingers with prolonged shooting was the cord for the finger loops; I changed that out to a softer weave. Much better.

3.) The other major design element that saw change was the overall shape of the tab. All those curves you see are not irrelevant eye candy but are form following function. If you look at this pic -



and hold your right hand out before you with your fingers outstretched and palm facing you, you will see that the leading edge of the tab follows the line of your fingertips and the curves of the butt edge of the tab socket into the line where the base of your fingers meets your palm. This, combined with the double finger loop, allows the tab alignment to land in the same place every time. The other changes I made were to the leather stiffener strip across the butt of the tab. I made it slightly wider, and incorporated the bitter end of the finger slot into the entire thickness of the tab. In use, the string actually lands about 1/4" forward of the front edge of the stiffener, so no interference there. And it prevents the inevitable wrinkle that the butt end of the finger slot takes on if not reinforced in some way. Finally, I put a gentle radius on the leading edge of the stiffener, with its high point right at the finger slot. A little thing perhaps, but I've found that it makes hooking the tab to the bowstring just that much easier and smoother.

A final note: I haven't yet decided whether to add stitching. The glue I'm using is more than sufficient from a structural standpoint, so the only thing stitching might add would be a little additional stiffness to the butt of the tab. We'll see . . .

Otherwise, I'm happy with what I now have. Was it worth making five different tabs to get to this one ? Am I probably nuts ? My answer is a qualified "yes" to both - but that's the price you pay for being a perfectionist.



Regards,

Salskov
 
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Sweet looking tab, for sure...My home-made tab creations dont look nearly as well crafted as that, and if it's a custom fit to Your hand, and works out well, then the time and effort were certainly not wasted...I like it!........Jim
 

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Are you not concerned that the string groove developing after only 50 shots would be a sign of early wear?

Not that I know much about tabs, just thinking aloud.
 

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赛
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello

Quote =I also upgraded my adhesive from Barge Cement to .

? What cement did you up grade to . Thanks [ Later
Unk -

The glue is a Bostik product marketed under the catchy name of "Serious Glue". I've been unable to find any published data on what its chemistry is, but it acts like some kind of souped-up polyurethane adhesive. Warning: its not the easiest stuff to work with, is a pure b- to clean up and a little goes a long way . . .

As to your other question, the 1025 denier ballistic nylon is the heaviest (18 oz.) and thickest weave. It is also the original (Dupont) ballistic nylon standard.

Regards,

Salskov
 

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赛
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Are you not concerned that the string groove developing after only 50 shots would be a sign of early wear?

Not that I know much about tabs, just thinking aloud.
Nope. What it is, is the middle layer of synthetic felt doing what I hoped it would do, compressing about 30% in thickness under string load and then taking a "set" there. The ballistic nylon facing ain't wearing no how, no way.

Regards,

Salskov
 

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赛
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Actually, there's a 1600 D ballistic nylon available......I tested the 1600 D and 1000 when I was working on tab designs.
Correctomundo. Haven't worked with it myself, but read a couple of test reports that rated its abrasion resistance distinctly lower than the 1050 . . . not sure if it isn't a sort of cordura-ballistic hybrid ?

Regards,

Salskov
 

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Nice job on the tab.
 

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Unk -

The glue is a Bostik product marketed under the catchy name of "Serious Glue". I've been unable to find any published data on what its chemistry is, but it acts like some kind of souped-up polyurethane adhesive. Warning: its not the easiest stuff to work with, is a pure b- to clean up and a little goes a long way . . .

As to your other question, the 1025 denier ballistic nylon is the heaviest (18 oz.) and thickest weave. It is also the original (Dupont) ballistic nylon standard.

Regards,

Salskov
=====================

Hello
Thanks for your reply and input.

Worked in a chemical plant for 7 years. Made several different types of glue.One being the glue we fletch are arrows with. I can about smell it and tell you the solvents used to break it down. Had all the formulers in my head still. Could have been rich man ha ha

Still waiting on my samples of 1050 and 1600.and one more I can't recall.[ Later

Here you go.

http://www.bostik.co.uk/diy/product/evo-stik/Serious-Glue/16

Bonds:

Glass, ceramic, plastic, mirror, leather, rubber, wood , metal, stone, china

Product Overview:

For all materials in all conditions
High strength - lifetime bond
Waterproof
Transparent - non-drip gel
Extreme temperature resistance -30C to +130C
Solvent-free, odourless, safe to use
 

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Hello All
Well my samples arrived. BAL 1050 and BAL 1680 .
If some one is using this type material. They must be a hearing it with another piece of material for thickness.

Now I went to put it in storage box. And there win that box, was my new bow stringer. And on the end of that bow stringer was. The material I was looking for. So I contacted them. For a return phone call. In hopes of of

acquiring there supplier of the material. Will let you know how things turn out. [ Later
 
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