Trad Talk Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Razorcaps, Montecs, Snuffer SS. I have used stones, a diamond "stone", sandpaper, leather. Not in that order per say, just thats what I've tried. Can I expect to actually shave hair, because it aint happening. Is it just too steep an angle or what? Points are needle sharp and take no effort to push thru fabric or paper, but the lenth of the blades just are'nt as sharp as my 2 blades can get. Normal? Or do I just stink at sharpening them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I have used sand paper to sharpen knives I forge to fling hair, if the blade is damaged/dull, start with 400-and work up like 400-600-1000-2000. For dressing out game I find 1000 and even 600 make a nice edge that realy cuts well, but 2000 starts flinging hair realy well. Just make sure its on a flat surface, you might even want to glue it down. I also use 800 and 4000 grit japanese water stones. Try and follow the bevel with the coarser grits, and the last grit you use raise the blade up a bit and just touch the edge lightly.

Angle is important, the more shallow the angle the sharper it can be. Steel type too maters, some low grade stainless just won't take and edge. Your two blade heads are probably high carbon steel, wich is an easy steel to get sharp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,091 Posts
The brands you mention are usually sharpened on the "flat" (IE; two blades flat on the stone) This makes for a steeper angle (~30 deg) than a two blade (~23 deg) the change in angle makes it much harder to get shaving sharp. It can be done but requires serious attention to thepressure you aplly to the stones. As in the last few passes you appply NO pressure and let gravity do the work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I have never heard of anyone else with this observation but here goes.

I am sort of sharpening obsessed. When sharpening the WW and to a lessor degree the Snuffer I have found that too much or too heave can create a hook or ridgid burr on the edge. Once this happens there is no correcting it without some individual attention to the edge. No more putting two edges down.

For the record I have been timed on a new out of the box WW. It takes me less than five minutes to get a razor sharp broadhead. It can be done.

But if you were to compare my best effort on a WW with my best effort on a STOS there would be a difference. Dan is very right on that angle (pun intended).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Look at the 3-Rivers site; specifically at the angled sharpener that holds two files on one beveled piece of wood.

If you're serious about sharpening multiple heads for years, that's a good route to go.

Just file til the "new" angle is set, lower the pressure until the head is razor sharp, counting strokes on each side, and then finish by stropping on some leather, or the leather part that comes with that file kit.

They will shave hair after that, and it is only a 5 to 8 minute deal per head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,381 Posts
"Hair shaving sharp" is certainly attainable on the flat, and as Dan and Penny have said it's certainly doable in a reasonable amount of time. I too am kind of anal when it comes to sharp and, unlike most, I do my 3blades on a wheel. I suppose you could say that I hollow grind though I never set out to accomplish that. My goal was to reduce the 3blade angle closer to that of the 2blade. For me it was the quickest and most consistent way to do that.

I start out on a medium 6"wheel and apply med-light pressure to the "three doubles". I do this in both directions, meaning, I sharpen with the wheel turning away from me and the BH tip pointing first right...then left. This is to raise a decent burr and to keep any unevenness in my pressure "equal". Having accomplished this I go to a 6" fine grit wheel and basically polish up the edges, which removes most of the burr.(This takes roughly 2-3mins)

I'll now go to a solid DMT fine grit stone(to me it feels more medium) and very lightly stroke the edges of the 3 doubles on the flat. Next, to the extra fine and do the same. I finish up stropping on a soft piece of leather...Yup, soft..not hard. For me, it works a lot better .

Just thought I'd offer a slightly different option. FYI my motor is a Delta 1/3HP, 2 shaft.

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I assume your all going point first in your strokes, but how about when you get to leather stropping (if you use one). And thanks guys, I have some work to do I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,490 Posts
For Snuffers & Woodsmans, i use an 8" mill bastard.
I run it across 2 blades at a time & feel for the burr edge to roll over, then use light strokes back & forth to bring it out to a good edge.

I used to put em on a diamond stone & leather strop, but i don't feel it's necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just a follow up. I got a mill file, I have to admitt I had my doubts a file would leave a good edge. I'm impressed. Much better than sandpaper. Very quick to do also. Thanks all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,913 Posts
My experience with the 3 blade heads started with Roger Rotthhaar who taught me how to sharpen Snuffers. The technique is simple and the key it to do two edges at at time and use the best stones, hones, or files you can fine. I find that if I shoot a Razorcap into ground and really dull it I have to first use a very coarse stone, like the black DMT, and get a hunting sharp "rough" or burr edge. After that it is a matter of going on to progressively finer hones. I pull the two blades on the flat to me rather than push them away. I count to 30 so each blade gets 10 swipes. If the edge is not good I repeat until I get that sharp rough edge then repeat the process until I get the finest hone I have. Then I take the same process to a ceramic rod and let gravity do the work, as suggested above. i can get a hair popping edge on a Razorcap in several minutes. Three blades are the easiest to sharpen and the RC's hold an edge. I shot thru the "knee joint" on a deer this year, destroying the whole joint and the RC was still shaving sharp when I found it. Once you get the hang of it you will be impressed at the results. By the way, for what it is worth the files on the angled jigs do not do the best job and often, for me, did more damage to the head than anything.:)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top