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We few, We happy few...
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I would like to hear someone's experience with the Air Force Academy. My son is 15 and that may be an option. We can get the congressional nomination. But, I am curious as to the experience.

Comments?
 

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Like any other college and career path, it's a big commitment. But if he has the self-discipline it's also a great opportunity. (They'll provide the external discipline ;-) )

Good luck to him, whatever path he chooses.
 

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We few, We happy few...
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Background info.

He is #17 in a class of 625. A highly disciplined student.

Varsity Athlete as a Sophmore. Is a Student Advisor and V.P. Student Council blah, blah, blah. So, he has the School and Athletic Credentials.

The nomination from a US Senator is not an issue.

What I would love to know is: what was someone's experience(s). I would love to hear from a Former Cadet and get their take on things.
 

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You might PM MR Van. He probably knows a few.....Come to think of it, there are a few guys here who probably do.........
 

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Found this in a discussion of colleges over at the 'Whatever' blog -

"" FL Transplant
February 15, 2014 at 10:56 pm

I graduated from the USAF Academy. Structure? You want structure? Let me tell you about structure…

Academically USAFA had a huge core curriculum (110 semester hours of academic courses, required by all), spread about evenly between math/science/engineering and the humanities. The fuzzy majors (poli sci, English, history, psychology, etc) took the same math/science/engineering load and courses as the STEM people (no "math for poets"; everyone took the same partial differential equations), and the STEM people took the same English comp and lit, US/world history, etc classes as those majors did.

It was unusual to be able to select a single class your first two years-everything was assigned core - and the last two years once you picked a major there was little opportunity to move beyond the core and required majors classes (allowing for the "pick one of these two classes for your major" selections). Everyone had large parts of the core they hated.

But over the years I came to treasure the very diverse education I received. And as I've watched lots of kids struggle with the lack of structure in their college life I concluded that the lock-step I was forced into wasn't all bad. ""

http://whatever.scalzi.com/2014/02/15/why-i-didnt-go-to-bennington-college/#comment-559189
 

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be sure that your son's career path is basically military before signing off to the academy. below is the guidelines for drop-outs and discharged students, as well as those who finish their education.
the 4 year course is valued at more than $400,000 by the government and is definitely well rounded but comes with certain obligations.

Obligations

When you arrive at the Academy, you’ll sign an agreement (with the consent of your parents or guardian if you are a minor) stating that you’ll fulfill the following service obligations, which apply to all cadets except international students.
You will complete the course of instruction at the Academy, unless you are disenrolled by the proper authority.
You will accept an appointment and serve as a commissioned officer in the Air Force for at least eight years after graduation, five of which must be active duty and the remainder can be served as inactive reserve. You will become eligible to request a separation from the Air Force after five years of service.

Once you arrive, you will take the Oath of Allegiance. Failure to take the Oath of Allegiance will cancel all entitlements to travel expenses to the Academy as well as travel expenses back to your home.

If you entered the Academy from the Regular or Reserve component of any service and are discharged from the Academy before graduation, you will, under most circumstances, return to your former rank and branch of service to serve the rest of your obligation.

Graduates who complete pilot training incur a longer commitment. The Air Force policy in effect when you enter flight training determines the length of your commitment which is currently 10 year after completion of training.

Discharge Policy

The policy requiring discharged cadets to serve in the Air Force may vary depending on the manpower needs of the Department of Defense. Air Force policy now states:

Fourth- and Third-Class cadets (freshman and sophomore) who are separated by the Academy, or whose resignations are accepted, will ordinarily be completely relieved from all military duty active or reserve.

Second- and First-Class cadets (junior and senior) who are separated by the Academy, or whose resignations are accepted, will normally incur a commitment for active duty. Exceptions will be made for humanitarian reasons and those few cases in which it is not in the best interest of the Air Force to call a cadet to active duty because of physical disqualification, misconduct or demonstrated unsuitability for military service in an enlisted status.

Second-Class cadets who are disenrolled or resign on or after the first day of academics in the fall semester of the Second-Class year will incur a two-year commitment for active-duty service. This commitment is three years for First-Class cadets on or after the beginning of the First-Class year academic semester.

First-Class cadets who complete the entire academic program and then resign or refuse to accept a commission may be ordered to active duty for four years as enlisted airmen.

If you incur a commitment, you’ll normally transfer to the Air Force Reserve component in an enlisted status and be ordered to active duty.

Cadets who fail to complete any period of active duty may incur a liability to reimburse the U.S. government for an appropriate proportion of the cost of their Academy education.
 

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Spearhead
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Matt, I was raised in a military background and household, step dad was in the navy, real dad in army, one of my sisters was in af, both brothers af, needles to say I went to the military not because I had to. I wanted to and felt it was my duty to.
I went Army don't regret it in the least.
I did a year of college in my mos, ran 4 nights a week, push-ups sit ups on and on, I was ready.
Something to consider is he mentally fit. They will MESS WITH YOUR MIND to put it mildly. But times may be different and also af may be different? Cadet and ocs sound like same thing officer training.

Make sure he's mentally ready

Chad
 

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"mess with your mind" LOL! boy, aint that the truth! I will NEVER forget basic training at Lackland AFB. :p basic training in one service or the other should be mandatory before going to college, whether you actually enlist & serve or not! it gives a person a whole new outlook on life...
 
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