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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems I never cease marveling at what seems an infinite plethora of possibilities when it comes to bow design be it the geometry of the bows riser or the profile of its limbs.

That said?....I really like my old 58"/40#@28" Pearson Hunter 709 as it's a real solid performer as it should be because the 58" Pearsons 21" I-Beam Rosewood riser doesn't leave much length left for it's short and snappy glass/maple limbs that will push arrows across the chronograph within a couple FPS of my 58"/45# Bear Grayling Grizzly that comparatively (and regretfully cause I love Bear)?...has all the draw quality of a strung broomstick and now enter the the 62"/40#@28" Bushmen Scythian.

I had the honor of being invited to play a role in the design and development of the Scythian and knowing what I know about bows?...my chest was tight and I had a large lump in my throat the day I broke out the chrono to pit the Scythian against the Pearson and why?...well?...the pearson is a 4" shorter bow with a 3" longer riser leaving it with some 18 1/2" short, punchy limbs making it quite the pocket rocket while the 62" Scythian has an 18" solid G10 riser leaving it with longer 22" limbs however?...to the Scythians advantage?....its limb construction is of CF over quad cores of action-boo vs the glass/maple limbs of the Pearson Hunter and even though the Pearsons riser is of a D-Flex geometry?...despite the Scythian solid G10 riser appearing to be of a Reflexed geometry?...the wildly forward pitched fades offset that feature difference to where both the Pearson and the Scythian both Brace up equally at 7 3/4"s.

I was pleased to see that the Scythian hung right with the Pearson arrow speed wise when I really didn't expect it to because the 62" Scythian was scaling 3-4 pounds less than the Pearson at 20"s of draw making the front end of the Scythian feel much easier starting and overall smoother drawing as its poundage came on more in the backend yet somehow felt far easier to draw and hold as my body came to a higher level of strength as I reached full expansion making the more difficult starting front end loaded Pearson seem like it was energy spent for naught.

This begged that a deeper analysis be observed so I could shop and compare what the heck is actually going on between the profile of these two very different drawing yet dead tied performance wise bows....I have my opinions and now I'll let you draw yours if you're so inclined.

The pic is of both bows Static/Full Draw L-R with the Scythian up top and the Pearson Hunter Below.

Thanks for reading and looking. Jinkster.
Plant Branch Terrestrial plant Organism Arecales
 

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. . . the balance between the bending section & siyah - the “Kasan” - the crucial to the smoothness (plus) - or - stacking (negative) of Asiatic bows . . .

I‘ve shot both variants.

The widely advertised “war bows” are an excuse for poor workmanship & the stacking must be experienced to be believed . . .

Of course any short bow - from 45” to 55” (strung length) - is prone to stacking & take an excellent bowyer to balance the bow.

regards,

John
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
. . . the balance between the bending section & siyah - the “Kasan” - the crucial to the smoothness (plus) - or - stacking (negative) of Asiatic bows . . .

I‘ve shot both variants.

The widely advertised “war bows” are an excuse for poor workmanship & the stacking must be experienced to be believed . . .

Of course any short bow - from 45” to 55” (strung length) - is prone to stacking & take an excellent bowyer to balance the bow.

regards,

John
Hey John...thanks for weighing in as your knowledge of such is always appreciated and that said?....I'm presuming you've zeroed in on how I described the scaling and how the Scythian trailed the Pearson by 3-4lbs less weight at 20"s of draw then how it caught back up to 40#s at 28"s but I can tell you that 3-4#s was equally dispersed by way of a small gradual increase and with the longer limbs?...that gradual increase was well hidden throughout those last 8"s of draw. I (and the scale) detected zero stack out to 30"s and then from 30"s too 31"s she jumped.

Here's some "String Angle/Lift" and Full Draw pix to further compare and evaluate...

Arm People in nature Gesture Tree Plant


Scythian Tip/String Lift...
Terrestrial plant Arecales Grass Twig Flowering plant


Pearson Hunter Tip String/Lift...
Plant Terrestrial plant Arecales Tree Flowering plant
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good stuff Jinks, I recently acquired a couple of asiatic inspired bows from Attila’sarchery. I’ll try to do a review later. I will say they are quite fast.
Very cool and I just got notified yesterday that Jozsef Munos has finished building my bow and is in the process of applying the the custom artwork...it as well is a 40#@28" bow.
 

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I have found that some of the older bows do very well in comparisson to the recent bows and they do so with greater simplicity. For my money's worth and older well designed bow is about as perfect as I can want. While the modern bows may have more attraction it's not enough meat for me to go that route.
 

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Jinks -

You may find this interesting :


. . . and this . . ,



regards,

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks John and yes...I see where there are dual definitions of stacking where one relates to a stacking DFC which is what I described however confused it with a "Stacking Point" which is where we determine what the bows "Max Draw Length" is but getting back to what's being described as a "Stacking DFC" in the vid?...I would contend that there's an alternate way of appraising such a DFC in that I describe it as an "Easy Starting DFC" which I feel has its place and can be beneficial when drawing from awkward positions and/or?....just easier on the wrists/elbows/shoulders where the power comes on as the archers body reaches an advantageous draw position with regards to physical power and strength...now if I want to put on my critic hat?...I could call it a mushy front end but is that not an advantageous attribute if it doesn't come at the cost of performance?
 

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I watched that first video on stacking - it leaves much to be desired. Hes talking in generalities - but if you going to do that you should be making an easier to follow explanation.
 
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