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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Out of doors practice.

. . . and boy . . . I am terribly rusty . . .

It’s counterproductive to shoot inside as a habit.

regards,

John
Plant community Plant Grass Terrestrial plant Triangle
 
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I don’t believe shooting indoors is counterproductive. Many do it to stay in shape and work to keep up their form. Yes, walking outside is different like shooting in the backyard then going to 3D shoot in the woods. Some will say it’s a mental thing, maybe, maybe not. I am going the other way. I feel I am in a confined space, want to tighten up.
 

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I haven’t found indoor practice to be counterproductive at all. I take about 80 shots everyday and 90% of them are shot indoors at 10yds. I just look at it as form work and don’t see any reason it shouldn’t carry over outside under normal conditions.

Now if you only shoot indoors and then all of a sudden go hunting in freezing cold weather while wearing heavy thick clothing then you can probably expect problems. I don’t hunt or shoot outside when it’s freezing so it’s not a factor for me. But if I did you can bet I would practice under those conditions before ever firing an arrow at an animal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I haven’t found indoor practice to be counterproductive at all. I take about 80 shots everyday and 90% of them are shot indoors at 10yds. I just look at it as form work and don’t see any reason it shouldn’t carry over outside under normal conditions.

Now if you only shoot indoors and then all of a sudden go hunting in freezing cold weather while wearing heavy thick clothing then you can probably expect problems. I don’t hunt or shoot outside when it’s freezing so it’s not a factor for me. But if I did you can bet I would practice under those conditions before ever firing an arrow at an animal.
The operational mode is the “to shoot inside as a HABIT” . . .
I shoot inside regularly (4-7 days).

I need to balance it out on outside shooting . . ,

regards,

John
 
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The operational mode is the “to shoot inside as a HABIT” . . .
I shoot inside regularly (4-7 days).

I need to balance it out on outside shooting . . ,

regards,

John
Yeah ideally I would like to shoot outdoors more often if for no other reason than practice judging wind corrections and shooting at various distances. I would like to someday try my hand at 3D but right now there’s no courses near me that I’m aware of.
 

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First 3d of the year was last weekend. I thought I would do fine since I've been shooting NFAA indoor every week for a couple months. ASA pushed traditional class from 25 to 30 (33 with the 10%) yards max, still unknown yardage, this year. I shot a round with my 600 grain indoor arrows and it wasn't good at all, 3 misses and a few 5 's. Need to set up faster arrows and get better at ranging. I had been shooting barebow the last couple years, 30 yards but known distance. That is a big difference.
 

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I haven’t found indoor practice to be counterproductive at all. I take about 80 shots everyday and 90% of them are shot indoors at 10yds. I just look at it as form work and don’t see any reason it shouldn’t carry over outside under normal conditions.

Now if you only shoot indoors and then all of a sudden go hunting in freezing cold weather while wearing heavy thick clothing then you can probably expect problems. I don’t hunt or shoot outside when it’s freezing so it’s not a factor for me. But if I did you can bet I would practice under those conditions before ever firing an arrow at an animal.
I know I'm not alone in saying this, but personally speaking shooting indoors at 10-15m, over and over, leads to TP issues when I go outside and face a target 30/35m away (tense, anticipating the shot, not letting my aim settle) . It doesn't matter how good my form is indoors. I have no such shot-control issues creeping in when practicing outdoors however on a daily basis.

Doing walk-back training from 10-30/35m, one arrow at a time is ideal for me, and I do it no matter what the weather now (heavy rain and wind excepted), rather than shooting in the garage.
 

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I know I'm not alone in saying this, but personally speaking shooting indoors at 10-15m, over and over, leads to TP issues when I go outside and face a target 30/35m away (tense, anticipating the shot, not letting my aim settle) . It doesn't matter how good my form is indoors. I have no such shot-control issues creeping in when practicing outdoors however on a daily basis.

Doing walk-back training from 10-30/35m, one arrow at a time is ideal for me, and I do it no matter what the weather now (heavy rain and wind excepted), rather than shooting in the garage.
The max distance I shoot is 20yds so TP is pretty much non existent for me. In fact TP has been described so many different ways I don’t even know what the definitive definition of it is and frankly I don’t want to know.

I enjoy shooting every arrow no matter where it lands. Of course my goal is to keep it inside the 8 ring or better but when I don’t I immediately forget it and shoot the next arrow. There’s no panic involved at any time.

Now if I was a hunter I could see how it might come into play because I would never want to wound an animal with a careless shot and cause needless suffering but I wouldn’t even consider a shot outside of 20yds and that would have to be under perfect conditions.

I’m just a back yard shooter that would like to compete occasionally on a local level. I guess if I needed the 10 ring to win a world title I might find out what TP is real quick. Don’t see that in my future though.
 

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The max distance I shoot is 20yds so TP is pretty much non existent for me. In fact TP has been described so many different ways I don’t even know what the definitive definition of it is and frankly I don’t want to know.

I enjoy shooting every arrow no matter where it lands. Of course my goal is to keep it inside the 8 ring or better but when I don’t I immediately forget it and shoot the next arrow. There’s no panic involved at any time.

Now if I was a hunter I could see how it might come into play because I would never want to wound an animal with a careless shot and cause needless suffering but I wouldn’t even consider a shot outside of 20yds and that would have to be under perfect conditions.

I’m just a back yard shooter that would like to compete occasionally on a local level. I guess if I needed the 10 ring to win a world title I might find out what TP is real quick. Don’t see that in my future though.
I know you said you don't want to know but to disarm it a bit, TP is really just a somewhat alarmist term for persisting loss of shot control due to either anticipating the shot, getting too excited, collapse of confidence, etc. All normal stuff in the course of an archer's journey. For some archers (including an olympiad) it's not being able to release, for others it's never reaching anchor or collapsing before the shot, for most it's uncontrolled 'snap shooting'.

In my view, addressing TP is essential to shooting well - especially at longer and longer distances - as it is the path to achieving total shot control, and I don't believe it when archers say they have never experienced it.

If folk don't struggle with it often, then that's awesome. We all have our triggers though. For some it's that rare 40m shot. For others it's having 500 people and a camera crew watching them shoot. Mine's shooting indoors at short distances too much.
 
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