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This result was from a good shot, good arrow flight and flight was right over sensors.

Bow was a 28# on my fingers, arrow 443 grs. How many believe the chrono



The arrow has top hat brass points on them. When the sun is low I get readings like this.

Ya gotta be careful. A chrono can make you look like you are telling a fib
 

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I saw a 256 yesterday that caused a double take. I had just shot a broadhead and think it gave off a flash.

Say, are those gas cans by your target, getting ready for the fourth?

Rasyad
 
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I use the IR light bars even when I am using the chrono outside. I start to get spurious readings when the sun starts to go down. That is when I stop since I can no longer rely on the numbers.
 

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Good point. I used to spend quite a bit of time shooting over one to refine things. I know I'm doing my part when I get a string of five at the same speed.......
 

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Interesting the variance between chronos and conditions, I guess we never know if our results are correct or not.

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The key to getting good results out of a chrono, like any test device, is having a good, repeatable process and controlling conditions. You can't just start flinging arrows through it an expect that what the LED displays is correct. Since we do not have easily accessible primary standards for speed, the best we can do is to calibrate our procedures to provide repeatable results, shot to shot, and day to day. Testing the capability of the procedure with a compound bow or recurve with a clicker will help since there will be less variation from the archer. In fact, a compound bow could be set up as a calibration check before new measurements are made. I have found that compounds are very consistent, even when shot with fingers. I have learned how to get good numbers out of my chrono and how to identify when the conditions have degraded to the point where the results are no longer valid. I can take the same bow and get the same results day after day, and the results are what I would reasonably expect. That is what we are really interested in. Whether my 203 is really 205 or 201 is less important, as long as my measurements are reasonable and consistent. That means I can compare measurements I have made from bow to bow and feel they are consistent across the population of bows that I have tested. I cannot, however, tell you that my 203 is faster than your 201, nor do I care to. We are not using the same procedure and our chrono's are not recalibrated on a regular cycle, or at all.
 

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If you shoot the same arrow over the same chrono you will learn much about your own procedure. That is the signature benefit of the chrono.

It will also document your fatigue limits.
 

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If you shoot the same arrow over the same chrono you will learn much about your own procedure. That is the signature benefit of the chrono.

It will also document your fatigue limits.
True, but that is not all. You just have to take into account the factors that affect the outcome. That is one reason why a Hooter Shooter is good. It may not give you your speed, but it should give the same speed as someone else repeating the experiment with a different Hooter Shooter. Don't look for perfection. There is a lot of grey area in science. That is where a lot of the innovation comes from. We need to navigate the grey if we are to continue to move forward. Navigating the grey is what separates the great scientist from his peers.
 
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