Trad Talk Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a beautiful Abbott longbow that is 53# draw @ 28. My shoulder can not pull that weight any more and I would like to reduce it to 48# to 50#. Any advice on the proper method to reduce the weight? Someone suggested slowly and carefully sand down both limbs evenly on the back side of the limbs. Not sure if this can be done or if it is a good idea. I want to keep the bow but just cant shoot it accurately at that weight. I need help!!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,889 Posts
No chance of sending it back to the Bowyer? If not, I'd recommend you send it to a Bowyer to do this. I know you are not a Bowyer or you would not be asking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
It can be done by someone who knows what they're doing. It's called "trapping." Take Sam's advice and have a bowyer (preferably the one that made it) do it for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
I would not just assume it should be trapped. What if it's already trapped plenty? Perhaps it could be narrowed, and/or trapped further? Someone with knowledge and experience should make an assessment.

You don't want to just commence sanding on the bow's back until you hit target weight either... in fact, that would likely be the last place I would work down as I've seen glass bows fail on the back.

When I've done it, to longbows, I've generally worked the edges of the limbs and reduced weight by
trapping (changing the limb's cross section from rectangular to trapezoidal) if it wasn't already, or by
narrowing limb width by measured strokes on each edge of limb. 5 pounds can be shed easy enough with various grades of sandpaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Unfortunately the bowyer recently passed away, I'm sure it could be done by another bowyer but I thought if given the right direction I could do it myself. I am excellent at working with wood. I think the trick would be to go extremely slow, a little at a time, as not to weaken the limbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the advice Jeff, that is exactly what I was liking for. I checked the limbs and they are rectangular now. Which should I try first, shaping the limbs to trapezoid or narrowing the limbs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
Jeff,
Pending on shape & glass thickness, you can narrow or trap the limbs. I tend to leave the tips a bit untouched especially if already small. Usually though I'd start with taking glass off first start . Weight will come off faster that way than sanding the edge down. If you've never done this than try counting strokes. It will be a long process cause you'll be tentative at first.

I now I just take the bow to my knife grinder and start hogging weight off. I've never had a problem even with a lot of weight reduction...but I won't sell a bow that I've reduced weight because of legal issues altering someone else's work. I do it only for myself. I won't touch another bladesmith's knife either...tippit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
With respect I think edge removal removes a lot more than surface sanding-seems like it was in a bowyers bible? I think 4-5# can be done with back and belly surface sanding,tape off the tips and grip overlays and avoid them.
 

·
Civil but Disobedient
Joined
·
10,516 Posts
Will 5 pounds really solve the problem? That is a little less than 10% reduction over what you are having trouble with today. It may cost more to fix than to try to sell and find a replacement in a weight that you can shoot for years to come. And then there is the risk that the bow does not turn out like you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
I think you reduce weight if you are looking at it as a fun project. I've taken more than 10# off some of my bows...but I won't sell a bow that I reduced as I don't want the responsibly if something goes bad. If you can sell & buy another bow always better.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top