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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Tradtalk,
since I am not a native English speaker, I sometimes have to use words, of which I understand what the meaning is, but I do not know the origin.
Most English words have roots that I can follow back to Latin, French or German but from time to time I stumble upon words where I don't have an idea, how especially that word came to that special meaning.

To build the bridge to this archery forum: It is about the word "riser"
In Germany we call this thing a "Mittelstück" which means middle part or "Griffstück" which means grip.

I looked it up in a dictionary but all I found was something in connection with "rising" or "raising". How can this general meaning be connected with what a bow riser is? Could anyone please enlighten me?

Thank you in advance.
 

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Its called riser because some dummy (probably a Yankee) used that word way back when and it stuck. English words have no reason to exist other than use that has caught on.

Kinda like the original english word 'pile" which is old english for point of the arrow, or the use of the word 'butt" for target

If it made sense what would be the point :)
 

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The term "riser" was used in England back in the 1850's to describe the addition of a thicker handle section to a longbow. It's usually attributed to English bowyer James Buchanan.
 

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This is just my investigative 2 cents worrth:

The definition of riser according to Webster Dictionary:
"1: one that rises (as from sleep)
2: the upright member between two stair treads
3: a stage platform on which performers are placed for greater visibility
4: a vertical pipe (as for water or gas) or a vertical portion of an electric wiring system"

Ignoring the first definition, the similarities in the other three definitions is two-fold: 1) it is the vertical portion of a larger system; and 2) it is the piece, typically vertical, which combines to working pieces of a system together. If this is acceptable, then the logic is that the vertical center piece which is the grip, connects the two working pieces, the limbs into a single system.

Apparently the word comes from the Old English "risan" or "arisan" which meant to go up.

I am not sure it is much help Holger.

Alan
 

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I like Phil's answer better than mine.

Alan
 
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Barefaced tightropewalker
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Kinda like the original english word 'pile" which is old english for point of the arrow, or the use of the word 'butt" for target
Trust you to use the words 'pile' and 'butt'................

:D
 

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Barefaced tightropewalker
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Okay....... I think for Holgers sake I'd better explain that 'pile' may also refer to haemorrhoids. I think he probably already knows about 'butt'. :)
 

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English has evolved to become a very abstract language. One of the many meanings of rise is to move from a lower position to a higher position......lower bow limb to upper bow limb. Therefore a riser. In English, the thought of middle conjures up a mental picture of center which would be the grip.

Dang if I know, but it sounds good?
 

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Barefaced tightropewalker
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A riser is also part of a staircase.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
You fit the description of a 'riser' quite nicely too!:p:p:p:p:p
 
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Barefaced tightropewalker
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Matt, you're an early riser.
 
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Seeing as how Phil is from England, I would think that he has a pretty good handle on the Kings English! I'll go with his explanation. Besides, he's the smartest one here, that replied. Now to the Squirrel on the other hand, well I'll let that one lay. Wouldn't want anyone piling on my butt. I have enough problems in that location as it is. My wife is very fond of eating on it on a daily basis. That's why I have a small one. What's left, the boss at work eats on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank you all, guys, for this enlightening thread!
I have learned a lot. Phil, great reply. I will take your explanation as a fact.
Greysides, thanks for this little insight into the meaning of 'pile' which indeed gives the expression 'pile in the butt' a dimension that I did not know up to now.
I enjoy very much communicating with you in English and having a chance of practising a bit.
Thanks a lot therefor.
Holger
 
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