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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to shoot self bows once in a while when I had a 28" draw. I have a 30" draw now and would like to get another self bow but can't find anyone to build me one. Everyone I've talked to said it can't even be done even if its backed. I would like to know if it is possible to have a selfbow at 68" or so and have a 30" draw. Backed or not.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the link hank. I like the looks of the flatbow he has.

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The bow was suppose to be about 45 pounds at 32 inches. It turned out to be something like 53 at 31 1/2. Maybe, he was accounting for set. I am sure he had never made a 75 inch bow before so he had to take a guess. The bow is heavy for me, the heaviest that I own. I don't shoot many shots out of it because of the hand shock. It puts a lot of stress on my elbow tendons. Also, at the size and weight, it takes two to string it, just to be sure I do not hurt myself. I got the bow to use as a model for when I make my own (next attempt). It is good to be able to see something that looks like what you are trying to make. I did the same thing when I decided to try to make PVC bows. Someday, I would like to get one of those twisty old primitive bows you see on Paleoplanet. Take a look at some of the beautiful bows in the bowyers gallery. This is the true art of the self bow.

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A bow's limits are set by its length, width, side profile, and inherent strengths and weaknesses of the species of wood used, even the vagaries of the specific piece... but NOT by the archer's draw length. Anyone who declares a 30 or 32 inch draw is beyond the ability of unbacked bows should NOT be trusted for advice pertaining to... well... I just wouldn't listen to em :^)

If a selfbow is designed for the archer, it will be fine. A bow can be designed to be drawn to 30 or 32", even in heavy draw weights, without being overbuilt, without handshock, etc... it should be as efficient, safe, and durable as any other.

What you DON'T want to do is draw a bow to 32" that was only designed, tillered, and trained to 28".
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I actually found a person locally that said he would make me one as soon as he gets caught up. Thanks for the info guys!


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if your making self bow out of hickory and you pull bark off for the back of bow. What do you do with the hart wood? do you use it like Osage and remove white wood and use the hart?
 

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With hickory, when you remove the bark, there is your back, unless you are using hickory lumber. Then you will want the straightest grain you can get.
 

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I also have a 30 inch draw. I have made 2 working bows now (out of 4 attempts) both are made from the same hackberry tree that I cut out of my yard years ago. I hand split them into 8 ft staves and stripped the bark right after they were cut. These staves were stored in my garage for around 4 years before I got around to trying my hand at making bows. First successful attempt is a 72 inch 2 inch wide flat bow. This bow shoots very well but is a little weak (around 35lbs at 30 inch) the second usable bow is 66 inches and around 1 7/8 wide and backed with sinew. This one is my main shooter right now. It tillered out to about 70lbs at my 30 inch draw it seems to shoot straight with very little shock and is relatively quiet even without silencers on the string. I thought at 70 lbs it would be very hard to shoot but I can shoot several dozen arrows before I wear out.
 
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