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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, Got a WARFed ProVantage Hoyt riser. I want limbs in the range of 64 to 68 inches and 40 pounds. The riser is 24 and 1/4 inches long. I assume from the length of the riser I choose limbs from short, med, or long to make my bow the required length.

And if that's correct, I say 40 pounds which is going to be + or - X number of pounds on my riser. What's the guess on variation?

And if those limbs come out 40 pound on my 24 inch riser and I put them on a 19 inch riser can I guess the poundage will increase because they'll flex more because the bow will be 5 inches shorter?

If my Hoyt risered bow comes out to 64 inches and I bought a 19 inch riser the limbs would make a 59 inch bow and a bow that would down right suck for shooting accurately???

Thanks in advance,

Bowmania
 

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Bart Harmeling
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I had a ProVantage that I converted using glue in plates. Pretty sure the limb bolts measured 18" which made it a 23" riser. I had it set up with short 50# Black Max Carbons which are rated on a 17" riser. The rule of thumb is you lose a pound of draw weight for each additional inch increase in riser length. The difference between 17 and 23 is 6 so you'd expect a 6# drop. This held to be true in my setup as with the limb bolts set to the minimum preload the bow as about 43# at 28". This setup was a 64" bow. SHort limbs on a 19" riser would be a 60" bow. Plenty accurate but depending on your DL and the limb qualities you may need to deal with felt stack and finger pinch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Nuthatch. I never thought of measuring it on the limb bolts. I measured end to end.

Bowmania
 

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Usually one measures the distance between the limb bolts and then add 5" to determine riser length. Have fun with that riser, it makes a nice for a nice shooting bow.
 

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Why would a 59" bow suck for accuracy? All mine are 60" and shorter and i get more accuracy than most. If you have good form its fine. Personslly i hate 68'-70" bows
 

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Barefaced tightropewalker
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Longer bows are generally considered more forgiving. If you're good with <60" imagine how good you'd be with 70".
 

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j-san = Jason
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I wonder if longer bows truly are more accurate shooting, or if they are merely smoother and thus, more comfortable to shoot, which then enhances the accuracy of the archer. I imagine if you put a 56" recurve and a 66" recurve in a shooting machine, both would shoot an arrow with equal accuracy.
 

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Barefaced tightropewalker
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A shooting machine won't require forgiveness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jerseyboy, No doubt you've heard the bowyer comment, "my bows are smooth out to 31 inch draw." Smoothness has nothing to do with accuracy. That smoothness comment is just something to say. I can be more accurate with a long bow that stacks like a telephone pole.

Finger pinch is another term used to describe the problem with short bows, but it makes one think of pain (pinch) and not the real problem. The reason they don't shoot compound with fingers is the amount of string on the finger at full draw. Compare a compound and 70 incher at full draw and think of the angle of the string coming off the forefinger and ring finger. That angle of the compound is more like shooting a slingshot with three fingers and an arrow. Think how much string is on your fingers when they're 3 or 4 inches apart at the start of the draw. Just physically impossible to get as clean a release as a longer bow. With something as critical as a release I think a 1/16 or a eighth makes a difference.

Viper in "Shooting the Stickbow" choose to put a picture of the angles I'm referring to around page 10-12-13. Early in the book.

Hope that answers your question. I surely don't want to say everyone has that opinion, but it's something I learned in 50 years of archery.

Bowmania
 

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I guess so. I own one bow thats 68" and i dont shoot it as well as my shorter bows because its onlt #30 which i dislike. I like more pressure on my fingers from a heavy draw
 

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The bows i use for field archery,3-D and indoor target are really more of a hunting bow the lightest of which is #48. I like to bust chops on my buddys calling them old men shooting #28-#35...haha. And before you say it yes i know im not normal
 

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I know this much:
A 25" or longer riser is far more accurate then any short bow out there, it's been proven time and again.
Limbs should be sized to the archer's DL then the length of riser chosen to get the longest bow which will fit with their shooting.

-Grant
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Jersyboy, I've notice the same thing. This winter I've been doing a lot of blank bailing. Some of it with a 30 lb Widow. I just can't get off the string. Back tension just doesn't feel right. When I jump up to my hunting bows - BANG - it's an explosion off the string.

Bowmania
 

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I guess we are just hunters at heart
 

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No argument on Bow length. If you hunt, chance are you may want a shorter Bow? No biggie,,,,,,,,if you are an Olympian, chances are you want a longer one. If you are your in your World, which most us are, shoot the Bow that best suits your goals for you. :shooting:
 
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