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Like most other things in archery it varies greatly with different bows and different people. Too low and you're bouncing of the shelf and getting false readings, too high and you're getting porpoising from the shaft. I always start high, which for me is about 5/8-3/4", and start shooting fletched and bare shafts from about 10 yards. I shoot, look at the vertical attitude of the bare shaft compared to that of the fletched, and start slowing bring my nocking point down until it's just barely above the horizontal angle of the fletched. That's where I leave it, knowing that the fletched shaft will overcome that small amount.
 

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Bart Harmeling
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Use a double nock set too. Keeps the arrow nock from potetially sliding down the string on release. You can use a little duct tape as a temporary.
 

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Like most other things in archery it varies greatly with different bows and different people. Too low and you're bouncing of the shelf and getting false readings, too high and you're getting porpoising from the shaft. I always start high, which for me is about 5/8-3/4", and start shooting fletched and bare shafts from about 10 yards. I shoot, look at the vertical attitude of the bare shaft compared to that of the fletched, and start slowing bring my nocking point down until it's just barely above the horizontal angle of the fletched. That's where I leave it, knowing that the fletched shaft will overcome that small amount.
That's what O do as well.
I don't usually know the exact distance.

John.
 

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j-san = Jason
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I shoot 3-under and the nock points vary from bow to bow. Some are as high as 3/4" and others are as low as 3/8" I suppose that can depend on tiller if your bow can adjust for that and which fingers you apply more pressure on the string.
 

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It would seem it also depends on what distance you are shooting wouldn't it?

Alan
 

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Like most other things in archery it varies greatly with different bows and different people. Too low and you're bouncing of the shelf and getting false readings, too high and you're getting porpoising from the shaft. I always start high, which for me is about 5/8-3/4", and start shooting fletched and bare shafts from about 10 yards. I shoot, look at the vertical attitude of the bare shaft compared to that of the fletched, and start slowing bring my nocking point down until it's just barely above the horizontal angle of the fletched. That's where I leave it, knowing that the fletched shaft will overcome that small amount.
Do you mean you stop when the bare shaft impact point is slightly below those of the fletched, and thus the bare shaft's at a slightly greater angle?
 

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No sir, I stop adjusting downward when the nock of the bare shaft is just slightly higher than those of fletched shafts when shot at the exact same target with a good release. Understand that this doesn't have to be a finite process, you can still control the vertical pattern of your arrows somewhat by nock point adjustment but usually if the bare shafts are that much lower or higher..more than just a couple of inches in either direction... I'd start looking at tiller.
 
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