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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have lots of experience bow hunting with compound.
I shoot year round , shooting 3D pretty much weekly during the spring & summer.

What would be a good recurve to get me started in this type archery ? Not familiar with recurve at all.

I saw a guy this season while hunting public land that had killed a very nice buck with a recurve. I can't get it off my mind since

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Some of the more popular recurves for getting started are the Mandarin Duck Black Hunter, Samick/Galaxy Sage, and the Southwest Archery Spyder. I’m a longbow guy and don’t have any experience with any of these bows but those names get brought up frequently and all can be had for under $200.

These are all 3 piece takedown bows but they’re not ILF so while you can change limbs to different weights you’re pretty much limited to the limbs from that manufacture. ILF risers will cost more but the limb selection is huge. ILF risers will also have a lot of adjustability such as tiller, limb alignment, and some draw weight variability too.

If you want to go the ILF route there’s tons of choices and it depends on how much your budget is. You can keep it simple and shoot off the shelf but you also have the option of other add-ons such as elevated rest, plunger, clicker, stabilizers and weights.

Just depends on what you want to do and how much you want to spend. You could probably get a decent ILF setup for $500 but I’m not familiar enough with the lower end of the market to make a recommendation. I’m sure others on here can steer you in the right direction though.

Also be careful when choosing a draw weight and don’t choose a weight that you’re used to shooting with your compound. I would say subtract at least 25% of your compound weight. So if your compound is 60lbs then I wouldn’t start off with anything over 45lbs for a recurve and personally I would start with less than that.
 

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I just got back into traditional and I am shooting the Old Mountain Stygian 45# that 3rivers sells. They run about 289. I am very happy with my bow. It’s 56” so it’s a good one to use in a blind or tree stand. I used to shoot a bear grizzly a few years ago and wish I still had it. I have shot the Samick sage but I don’t have any experience with anything else other than the three bows listed as far as traditional goes. I went with 45# because I wanted something not too terribly heavy but enough to hunt with. Good luck. Picking a bow is like picking a new pair of shoes. It comes down to preference and what your really trying to do with it and get out of it. Post an update when you make a decision! This is a great place and has helped me get started on my journey to becoming a better archer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't know enough to have an opinion. Mainly posted this question to get pros & cons of everything

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I do remember I shot the bear Montana long bow one time. It had quite a bit of hand shock. Recurves to me don’t have very much to any at all. I make a the comparison of how you throw a baseball when it comes to a long bow or a recurve. Example when you throw a baseball and you keep your arm totally straight and try to throw it it doesn’t go very far and doesn’t have the same speed. But when you can actually bring your arm back and snap it forward you have a lot more momentum and power in a shorter distance. That’s like a recurve.
 

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Some folk love to get 1 bow, and then “become one” with the bow. I think there is a little truth to the thought of “fear the man with one bow” Somebody that sticks with one bow, often times a wooden 1pc or takedown but can be anything, often becomes very proficient with that one bow.

OTOH, some guys love to tinker, love technology, the latest greatest, etc and enjoy getting into the ILF market, often times a metal riser but can be wooden, always has something else to try out.

I spent years in the stickbow only phase, often times just one bow, but now I am in the metal riser, ILF phase. And there is no rules saying you have to choose one over the other.

if a wood bow is even a thought, I honestly recommend that you get a Black Hunter. You can get them from many different places, and can be bought for around $100. This bow is an average-above average performer when it comes to performers. Maybe get a 35#. You can buy additional recurve or longbow limbs down the road, giving you different weights. These are pretty straightforward.

ILF, metal risers, or anything else are not necessarily complicated, but there is a little more that goes into those. That BHis an excellent intro to traditional archery…….
 

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Samick Sage

I started with traditional archery with a Samick Sage and it’s a solid starter bow. People won’t ever wax poetic about its charms, but you’ll also rarely find many complaints about it. It’s reasonably priced, high enough quality to get you off on a good start and limbs can be had for it in weights from 25 pounds to 60 pounds. That’s convenient as you can get one with 25-30 pound limbs initially to work on form, and then move up to 40, 45 or 50 pound limbs for something better suited to hunting.


Bear Montana

Someone commented on a Bear Montana. I own one and it’s not my favorite long bow. But it’s a $430 bow that is competing with my $650 Kota Prairie Fire and my $1300 Blacktail Colombian. They pretty well rank in that order. The Montana uses maple in the core with fiberglass on the outside, while the other two have 3 layers of bamboo In the core with curly mango and curly maple respectively on the outside. The bamboo cores seem to make for a smoother feeling bow with a softer feeling draw at similar pull weights.

On the other hand the Bear Montana isn’t a bad bow at all in the bigger picture, and it‘s a very good bang for the buck kind of bow. I also don’t notice any hand shock with it, but hand shock is largely subjective, and it’s also very dependent on arrow weight. I leave my arrows uncut and run arrow weights from 445 to 520 grains for my long bows, and heavier arrows significantly reduce hand shock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for helping me get educated . I have been studying most of the day. You guys have given me a lot to think about and I am soaking it up

I kinda go by the buy once cry once system. I do like to make good choices though so I will keep looking .

Every time I try to start out cheap I end up buying again and that first money was wasted

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Thanks for helping me get educated . I have been studying most of the day. You guys have given me a lot to think about and I am soaking it up

I kinda go by the buy once cry once system. I do like to make good choices though so I will keep looking .

Every time I try to start out cheap I end up buying again and that first money was wasted

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Nothing wrong with that at all. Once you decide on a bow make a post before you buy it. Sometimes it help to have the insight of those that actually own that particular bow. I researched for months before I bought my first bow and probably changed my mind a dozen times before settling on a longbow from Omega. Take your time, do forum searches, read reviews, watch YouTube videos….you’ll get there.
 

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So many options in bows. You got ilf/das, 3 piece , and, 1 and 2 piece.
With countless offerings in each category.
Ive spent a lot of money with the same ideals as you. The problem with that is, is its hard to know what you are after til you figure out what you are after.
I started with an Ilf and super curves then another ilf, then a das and other super curves. Got rid of those and got a wood 2 piece longbow, then another and now a wood recurve.
Wood bows scratch that itch for me. Though Ive yet to find one I feel really connected with.
Ilf/das bows make mix and matching very easy. I think they are a great starting point.
This stuff is so personal. You have to build some criteria to start narrowing down your choices.
Plenty of really helpful folks here to help guide ya
 

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Ya, stuff is real personal. In my experience, which I’ve owned a lot of bows, appearance and grip are the two biggest differences.

if you don’t like the way it looks, you won’t be as anxious to pick it up and have fun with it.
and think about what you feel on a bow, it’s the grip. If you don’t like the grip, it all goes downhill from there. Through lots of trial and error, I can now look at a grip in a picture and know if I will like it or not, for the most part. For instance, I am looking for a riser now, and I can scroll through something like alternatives and narrow 20 different risers down to a few real quick just based on a picture of a grip.

it’s tough buying the unknown, but it gets a little easier down the road.

have you been able to narrow anything down yet. Like wood vs metal?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I like the looks and idea of wood , but I think I am also like the ilf options



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I like the looks and idea of wood , but I think I am also like the ilf option.
The ILF options are great for a target shooter,

That said, take down bows in general tend to be heavier and ILF bows tend to be slightly heavier still in a wood riser.

For me, one of the major appeals and subjective pleasures of shooting a traditional one piece recurve, and even more so a one piece longbow is the wonderfully light weight of the bow. I also like the grips on all of my long bows far more than the grips on my recurves.

in the end you’ll end up owning multiple trad bows, so you probably won’t get as much utility out of an ILF bow as you think you might in terms of having multiple limbs.
 
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