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I am looking for a nice one piece recurve that is high quality and deadly I hunt turkey's whitetail and small game rabbits squirrels etc:shooting: was looking at bear grizzly and Damon Howatt x-200 or rebel I was wondering what's your guy'S opinion would consider a take down if it was high quality and traditional looking

Thanks guys
Triston
 

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You could look at rainy day recurves...A bit of a black widow knock off but you could get a new bow for about $500 and he has some in stock. Otherwise I would get an excel with some black max limbs. Metal is trad..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You could look at rainy day recurves...A bit of a black widow knock off but you could get a new bow for about $500 and he has some in stock. Otherwise I would get an excel with some black max limbs. Metal is trad..
There's just something about a wood that I like
 

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If I was looking to spend $400 and it has to be wood I would find a used bow...a new $400 bow will be a used bow once you get it....and maybe worth $300 at most....I'd find a $950.00 new bow used for the $400-$500 range and have a much better quality bow..thwt will still be worth $400 2-3 years from now..


Dewayne
 

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Barebow recurve
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Take-down bows are excellent for portability. iLF is best as risers and limbs are interchangeable. I have gone entirely to metal risers as they are easily adjusted, durable, provide good mass (not too light), and accessories are easily added/removed. My one piece wood bows are wall decoration now.
 

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The Samick StingRay or just about any of their one piece line up will come in well under your dollar limit.

I used to love the old American standards of Bear or Martin, but recently they seem to have lost the plot along with their past quality.

I think that to better Samick today you'd need to go custom from any of the very good smaller bowyers out there.


Cheers,
John.
 

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Bart Harmeling
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Sam just listed a 62" Quinn Stallion on the Trading Blanket. Great little bow, and it won't last long. This riser is also an excellent candidate for Warfing.

Don't let the blue paint deter you. Very easy to give these risers a custom paint job.
 

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Young Tradshooter, You didn't mention what poundage range you are looking for. There's alot of guys with alot of bows out there but you gotta say what size you're looking for. Chas. Edelstein
 

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If I were you, I would get:

A Samick Sage with a light set of limbs to shoot a lot of arrows with and a heavy set of limbs to train for a single shot.

12 practice arrows for the light limbs and 6 for the heavy limbs.

A good string to replace the one that is sold with the bow.

A Black Bear riser converted to accept the Sage limbs.

A strap on arrow quiver.

But then, I am not you. You are you and should go to a shop, club or range and shoot as many bows as you can.

You should also be able to find a used custom all wood bow for $400. Have you checked the classifieds on leatherwall?

Keep asking questions
 

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Barebow recurve
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LOL, I actually have a Samick Stingray! It is a nice little bow, but the finish is thin and uneven. That is what you get on an inexpensive bow from Asia. I would use it only for short distance shooting, like hunting in dense conditions. It is too short to be comfortable and too much weight for me to shoot recreationally or target. It is one of the bows that sold me on ILF, as it and my other one-piece bows are set that way forever and cannot be adjusted.

Samick Sage would be a good option to get started. A Hoyt riser would be best once you settle in, as all aspects can be customized. I forgot to mention above that grips are readily changed on metal ILF risers.
 
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