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Hi All, I am new to archery in general and have just started shooting my new Bear Montana 50 lb @ 28". I have a 29" draw length. I was advise to start with a compound but Traditional archery just seemed to appeal to me more.

I am shooting Benman(?) carbon arrows 400 weight with 100 grain field points. Not sure how heavy the insert is. When I bought the bow the guy installed a brass nock point (I asked for it to sit above the arrow nock) and the arrow sits level when nocked.

I have been shooting at 5 yards and when I do my part seem to get good groups (3 arrows within 4-5 inches) for a beginner. Sometimes I can stack one right next to the previous shot. No robin hoods yet... but did chip one shaft.

Questions:
Is the nock point in the right place for longer ranges?
Brace height is at 8 1/4" from deepest part of the riser - if I adjust this will I need to change the nock point?
Is changing the nock point an issue?
To adjust brace height, do I twist both ends of the string (opposite directions I assume) equally?
Do I worry about any of this and just keep on shooting and focus on form?

Sorry to ask so many questions, I do not live near a traditional archery shop or club.

Thanks.
 

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Just twist your string from the one end.
Most people nock their arrow under the nock point, or between two nock points.
I don't use brass nocking points, I use dental floss and tie my own because I can just cut it off a retie it any time I like.
Your nock point sets your arrows level/square to your bow, it has no effect on distances shot.
Your anchor point on your face which can be moved up or down can/will effect distances shot in regards your point on distance.
A high anchor will give you a short point on, a low anchor will give you a longer point on.
Point on = the distance the arrow will impact with your target when you hold the arrow point directly on that spot at full draw.
Better answers will be along shortly,,,and there are no questions you shouldn't ask around here.

Welcome aboard,
John.
 

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Civil but Disobedient
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If you are just starting out it is best to focus on form. Get your brace height and nock point in the right ball park and shoot. Further tuning is something that is easier to do once you have established a basic form and can shoot consistently. It is good to watch your brace height, though. The biggest problem I see with bows of folks just starting out is that their brace height was never set right when they got the bow, or it lowered from stretching and untwisting and they did not know that they are suppose to check it. Measure it and try to keep in close, but you do not have to obsess over it. Just keep it from falling out of an acceptable range. It will not make that big of a difference in the beginning.

My suggestion is to ignore targets to start. I put a piece of tape on the wall and point my arrow at it. I measure success by the size of the group that I get, and its position relative to the center line established by the tape. I am not shooting at the tape, I am just using it to provide a consistent aiming point. It is hard in the beginning to shoot a target and not try to make corrections between each arrow. You never know whether that high arrow was because you aimed high, or did not execute the shot well. So you start chasing the center of the target, changing how you shoot each arrow. This makes it difficult to determine what your issues are.
 

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Good advice from both gents IMO… Consider also doing a little research here on TT on the subjects of "Bale shooting" and "The Bridge Drill" , and training with both Bale and Bridge drills.

These are good subjects to read up on and develop your archery skills properly.

All the best, and Welcome to TT.

Tom
 

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Barefaced tightropewalker
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Posting video of yourself will allow us to help you with that.
 

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j-san = Jason
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Did you get your Bear Montana at a "big box" sporting goods store? I ask because your bow is 50# and at your 29" draw, that is likely going to be around 53# - kind of stout for any beginner and hard to develop good form if you're struggling to hold at anchor. Seems the big box stores only like to carry the 50# and up draw weights and anything less is for the women and children.

At any rate, just plain shooting is good to develop your muscles, form, and learn your sight picture. At some point, you will want to consider bareshaft tuning your bow to make sure things are lined up properly and to see how far well matched your arrows' spine is to the bow. Chances are, if it was a compound guy who set up your bow for you, then it's a fair ways off tune. Not to dismiss them, but setting up a single stringed bow is different form setting up a compound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone! Appreciate the input and advice. I'll keep shooting and focus on form as suggested before messing around too much with the bow and do a little more research . I did buy at a "BOX" store against my better judgement but also wanted something I can eventually hunt with when my skills develop enough.

Cheers
 

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It's hard to go wrong with a Montana. The only thing you lose at the "big box" store is in-house expertise on getting you set up properly. There's not much to adjust on these anyway other than nocking point and selecting the right arrows.
 

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Look into their exchange policy and see if you can get something lighter. A 50# bow is not going to be a successful introduction for 99% of the population. Everyone likes to be that 1% but the truth is that they just aren't.

I've taught quite a few beginners and helped some who started with heavier bows. Once they were shown how the bow is supposed to be shot they ended-up with much lighter ones to get the technique correct.

-Grant
 
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