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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. new to forum. I am a new archer. I am 34 and have not shot since I was about 12-13 years old. I just moved to Twin Cities, MN and wanted to learn to not only just do archery again for hobby and peace, but also to take up bowhunting end of 2016.

I just learned I am left eye dominant and switched from Righty to lefty (I do everything pretty much left handed though my writing is 90% of the time with my right hand). So that was a drastic change for me and feels awkward, but considering its been over 20 years, I dont have any real preconceived notions about shooting right handed.

I bought myself a 62" Samick Sage Left handed at 50#. My draw weight is around 27.5-27.8 so from my understanding I will be pulling at around 48-49#

I also have a Sebastian Flute Flame 62" with 28# limbs and 34# limbs. One set for me and the other for the wife, though the 28s i think will make great practice for me.

Finally, I got an amazing deal on a 1970 Bear Grizzly. It is 56" Left Handed with a 60# draw weight. I didn't need another bow but for the price and it being in amazing condition I simply could not pass it up. I was also surprised to see a 60# draw weight for a left handed one piece recurve, as it seems 55# seems to be the max for lefties generally speaking.

In terms of String, I bought Bearpaw Flemish String for my Sage and Sebastian Flute. I am not sure what to buy for my 1970 Grizzly.

Now that the specs are out of the way I am wanting to know what arrows to target and bowhunt with.

From what I have read recurve hunters like to have about 8-10 gpi or the draw weight. For me thatd be around 400-500 gpi and 480-600 gpi based on the Sage and 1970 Grizzly. Is that correct?

After careful reading I feel inclined to be in the "heavier is better" arrow camp over "lighter/faster is better" camp.

I was really inclined to get some Beman ICS Hunters and ICS White Outs. I have read so many good things about Beman Arrows for both Target and Hunting, I feel pretty inclined to go for them. I have also seen the Beman "White Box" arrows but I am not sure how good they are.

If I am getting 300 Spine thats about 280-290 gpi per arrow shaft (based on 30"). With Bohning blazers thats another 18 gpi, nock around 5-10 gpi and then a 125 grain broadhead. That puts the arrow weight around 430-440 gpi give or take. Am I correct in my understanding?

Now, would that setup be sufficient enough (and SAFE enough for both me and the bows) to be shooting out of my Sage 50# AND my Grizzly 60#???

also, another novice question, What exactly are arrow bushings? I also see something called Uni-Bushings as well.

Inserts, from my understanding are used for Broadheads, to make sure they dont crack the carbon arrows, and also add a little more grain weight to the front end. I see inserts anywhere from 10 gpi- 100gpi. Are they worth buying and putting on the arrows?

Sorry for the long drawn out intro with questions. I am excited. I have no idea to shoot a bow in proper hand and stature positioning yet, but plan on taking some lessons at Bwana Archery. Don't know ANYONE here in MN so if there are any locals on here, would love to come out and shoot some 3Ds or just targets and learn from someone.

Id like to learn how to undress and process game as well, and eventually how to fletch and vane my own arrows, as well as make my own strings.

That's it for now. Thanks for taking the time to read and respond.

-Khalil
 

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First off you will need different arrows for both those last two bows. I mean you can make a .400 spine work out of both of them but you will need to change point wieght and also add quite a bit to make them work out of either bow. If you go with a 30" 400 spine out of the 60# Grizzly I would say you will need a minimum of 275 grains of point weight for good flight. Also out of the 50# bow you would have to go really heavy, so I would suggest a .500 spine cut to 29.5"s with 175 grain tip plus the insert so 190 grains of weight up front. This will get you darn close if not perfect on both set-ups, but the 60# set-up may need even a tad more weight on the point end. You will be fine as far as weight of the arrow to hunt anything in North america. Shawn
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Shawn,

thanks for the quick reply. Maybe I am not understanding correctly but I thought arrow size was the same as spine number?

According to Beman's website, 500 is the lightest (7.5 gpi) and 300 is the heaviest (9.6 gpi).

Wouldn't I want a heavier arrow shaft for higher poundage recurves?
 

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The spine number, i.e. 400, 500, 600, etc. is the stiffness of the arrow and is the most important factor when choosing an arrow. The number represents, in thousandths of an inch, how much a shaft bends when placed across a 28 inch span and under the load of a weight slightly less than 2 pounds (1.94 pounds). So the smaller the number, the stiffer the arrow. Heavier bows need stiffer arrows. Shooting an arrow that is too flexible is dangerous since the arrow can buckle and shatter, causing injury. Selecting the correct spine is part of the tuning process that allows the arrow to fly straight. Adding weight at the end makes the arrow more flexible. Cutting the shaft makes it stiffer. So you have to start here. To get a particular gpp, you may have to get a stiffer shaft and add more weight at the end to bring the stiffness down to what you need.

And back to your comment, stiffer shafts are thicker and heavier, so the 300 shaft will be heavier than the 500. The 300 only deflect 0.300 inches under load; the 500 deflects 0.500 inches.

Here is a good link that explains it all.

http://www.huntersfriend.com/carbon_arrows/hunting_arrows_selection_guide_chapter_3.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hank,

thanks for the info. Based on the Bemans, 300 and 340 are the heaviest. the chart at the bottom of the link you attached, is that only for compound bows or is it for both?

if for both, its estimating a spine of 4 (.380-420 deflection) or 5 (.330-.370 deflection). The Grizzly would be on the cusp of using either. If I am understanding this right, Beman 300 means .300 deflection, size 340 means .340 deflection, 400 (.400 deflection) and 500 (.500 deflection). Am I getting that right?

If so, then that would mean for the Bemans, I should be getting size 340 for the Sage 50# and size 300 for the Grizzly 60#???? Or would having the same arrows work for both? Shawn's opinion was it was better to get two different arrows, one for the Sage and one for the Grizzly.

Determining the proper arrow seems to be the hardest part about one's archery equipment!

I am just so confused about what size to get, what bushings are, insert or no insert, etc. All this is like reading Greek to me
 

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Spine requirements are based upon arrow acceleration, as such, there should be different charts based on whether you are shooting compound, recurve, cams, wheels, longbow.....Any chart based on bow weight and draw length is only an approximation since bows are all different speeds. I would use the charts provided by the arrow vendor as a starting point. I provided the link for the explanation. I will let the bow hunters take over since they know the type of arrows you are trying to set up better than I do. I am a target guy and do not use broadheads. But I thought I could at least get you started on understanding the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks Hank, your info was informative and gave me a better understanding.

Hoping for some more views and opinions to make the best choice for an arrow.
 

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Hey Khalil,

I live in Fridley and belong to the Rapids Archery Club located in **** Rapids. We have a weekly traditional league on Sundays from about 5:30-7-ish pm. Come on out and join us! Lots of knowledgeable folk there who can help get you set up with the right gear. Whereabouts in the metro area are you?
 

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Khalil, glad you made it.
I'm going to recomend hanging those heavy bows up for a while. Your wife's bow is the right bow to practice with and build good form. I shoot 52-67 but I have to shoot light weight most of the time now to maintain some kind of decent form. Good luck. Look here often as there is a bunch of good folks here on Ttalk............Ray
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Jason,

I live in West Saint Paul. Been here since end of August/Beginning of September. From East Coast. That is great to hear about a shooting club thats somewhat local. Fridley is about 22-25 miles and **** Rapids is about 30 miles from me. Not bad at all.

Ray,

Yeah I definitely knew ahead of time I would not be shooting the 50# and the 60# anytime soon. I read that to get good form one should shoot around 20-25# around 500 times. I also read if you are switching your shooting hand due to eye dominance or injury one should shoot around 1000 arrows before the muscle memory really sets in.

I was at Cabelas in Woodbury MN, and I knew I was left eye based on tests. The guy confirmed it, and when I told him I couldnt even see the target with my left eye closed and right open, he said "Never shoot right handed, you'll be at least a foot or two off. Your left eye is extremely dominant since you can't see a thing."

So I tested a LH Cabela Recurve at 45#. If you have ever seen Robin Hood Men in Tights when Cary Elwes is teaching them how to do archery, that's what I looked like. Arrow kept dropping off the shelf as I am trying to hold it. Got my tongue stickin out like a panting dog in the summer in my attempt to concentrate. I shot three arrows: 1' directly above the bullseye, #2 northeast by about 8", #3 about 6" to the northeast of the bullseye. It literally looked like a set of three stairs.

So bad! LOL
 
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