Trad Talk Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright guys, kind of worried that I just wasted a lot of money. I have a 50lb Montana longbow and I am shooting arrows that are confirmed (through numerous charts and 3rivers calculator) too stiff, yet they seem to shoot and fly just fine (out of my 50lb grizzly, but haven't tried them in my longbow yet). What are the downsides to shooting an arrow that is too stiff? Will it harm my bow or the shafts?

please fellas, I need some input. I tend to be ocd about both my firearms and archery equipment. If somethings not perfect ill slowly lose my mind haha. Bottom line, am I doing any damage by shooting overspined arrows?

P.S.- These are my measurements:

- 50lb Montana longbow but my DL is only 25"
-Easton axis traditional 500's (cut to 26.5 with 125gr points)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,820 Posts
No. If it flies well, it is not too stiff. The charts may tell you such but your personal form is changing that. The Stu Miller/3Rivers formula has a section on the bottom of the page where you can enter a personal from adjustment number for folks just like you.
Try the formula with your set up and insert various values (-3, 3, etc) in the Form Adjustment section until you get the bow's dynamic value to match up with the arrow combination that is flying well for you.
 

·
Barebow recurve
Joined
·
947 Posts
Shooting arrows that are too stiff should not damage anything. Stiff arrows impact left of where you were aiming.

I do, however, have a neat archer's paradox demo where I shoot a too-stiff aluminum arrow from my longbow and you can hear a distinct "clank" when it hits the riser. Look out for that. If you are getting riser contact then aim and arrow flight will be really wonky.

One thought is that if your draw length is 25" on a 50# bow then the effective draw weight is actually in the 40#-45# range. Longbows also do require more limber arrows than recurves.

In any case, it should be OK to shoot. You can confirm flight with bare shaft test to see how far off the spine effectively is. You can also try heavier points to reduce spine to a more appropriate range.

I hope that helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,399 Posts
As long as the back of the arrow isn't contacting the bow as it leaves the string you aren't hurting anything. That kind of contact usually produces an audible "clack" sound.

A 26.5" .500 may or may not be too stiff for your recurve. If they are I'd think you could probably tune them with more point weight. Since longbows in general are not cut as close to center and often require a weaker shaft, you might have problems there with your short .500.

The only way you know for sure is tuning, preferably with bare shafts. If you don't want to do that just look at your arrow flight, if it's ok you are fine for now. Don't sweat the damage issue, it really isn't there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks a lot everyone! I really appreciate the help. All very useful information. Until I need more shafts though, im kinda stuck. Ill just fletch everything with 3x5" for now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,444 Posts
Get some 250gr points, that will help the situation. Plus the Montana seems to prefer a heavier arrow anyways.

-Grant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Grant, I'd like some 250's, but my point diameter is 17/64 and heavy points in that size are impossible to find
 

·
Bart Harmeling
Joined
·
3,549 Posts
Use the appropriate BAR (Broadhead Adapter Ring) for your Axis shafts. They will then take the larger diameter points. Here's a pic on a black Axis with 225gr points I made by gluing a 100gr point to a 125gr steel adapter.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top