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thumbless stringwalker
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I creep on one shot and my Beman ICSs hit the wall strait on behind the target.
How can I know if it have any damage?
It looks OK, no crack at sight but the nock set back a little from impact.
Any advise will help.
Thanks
Martin
 

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Put gloves on and hold the arrow with 2 hands. Bend the arrow a few different ways to see splintering. look at the nock end. If the nock end is fuzzy then the arrow is garbage. Is the insert driven into the front of the arrow? If it is the arrow is garbage.

Someone else will add more.
 

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Martin

Check the nock end carefully for a crack. I use my fingernail to feel for one. Look at the insert and see if it has moved. If the insert is loose, set the arrow aside until you can reglue it, so you don't leave tip and insert in the target when you pull arrow. You can use your bowstring to check for cracks. Hold the arrow near the fletching and vigorously bounce the shaft on the bowstring. If it is cracked, you will hear it. It's a good idea to check your carbons periodically, especially if you're shooting groups that are slamming together. Avoid shooting at the target from an different angle if you already have some arrows in the target. The carbon tube can be collapsed from side angle hits. Gloves and flexing is good idea like Donk says...those carbon splinters can be a bearcat to get out of your thumb...lol!
 

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I have had several arrows hit the brick wall behind my target in the last year.
None appeared damaged. However, when shot for awhile they developed long thin splinters. Fortunately, I haven't hit the wall - literally- for awhile. If and when I do, I'm going to throw the arrow away.
Just not worth the risk in my opinion.
Jim

:)
 

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thumbless stringwalker
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank for the answers.
I will get some gloves tomorrow to try the “bending” method.
The point insert is still glued and the nock end was protected with a aluminium sleeve. Both looks OK.
I think the arrow hits a “soft place” on the wall (it is an old wall).
If I find it is OK, I will check it periodically just in case.
Thanks Again
Martin
 

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I find those slivers to be worse than fiberglass. Nasty stuff.

Nice pointer on bouncing the shaft on the string. I'll remember that. Thanks for posting that.
 

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One other point I'd like to add when checking for that "loose, rattle sound" that usually points to a cracked shaft. A few years back I had a Beman 600 that sounded like that, but it wasn't cracked. Whatever kind of epoxy the guy had used when installing the point insert, had broken off inside the shaft to some degee and it was rattling arund in there. Thought it was a cracked shaft, but it wasn't.
 

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Barebow Recurve Shooter
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The other test some manufacturers advise, in addition to bending, is to twist the shaft (hold on each end and torque in opposite directions). If it's cracked you will hear a faint splintering sound.

Dave
 

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TBHNTR said:
D.A. is right... twisting is the recommended method.
Hmmm....who recommends that? I do it all the time pulling tough arrows, but My understanding is twisting is NOT recommended by manufacturers. Just curious...
 

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Stick it in the bull's-eye and use it for a "robinhood" target.:)
 

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Barebow Recurve Shooter
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Seven Arrows said:
Hmmm....who recommends that? I do it all the time pulling tough arrows, but My understanding is twisting is NOT recommended by manufacturers. Just curious...
From the "Warnings" page on the Easton web site:

Grasp the shaft just above the point and below the nock, then flex the arrow in an arc (bending it away from you and others) with a deflection of 1 to 2 inches (2.5 to 5 cm), and listen for cracking noises. Perform this test four to six times, rotating the arrow slightly between each flex until you have gone around the entire arrow. If you hear or feel cracking, the carbon has been damaged.

While still holding the point and fletching ends, twist the shaft in both directions. If the arrow "relaxes" or twists easily, the carbon has been damaged.

The second paragraph would be the relavent part, and I have twisted a cracked arrow and heard the "cracking noises" the talk about in the first paragraph.

Dave
 

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Thanks Dave...

I've trashed a lot of carbons. I probably don't check mine as often as I should. Lucked out so far...:D

I know I read someplace, not to twist them out of a target. I do it all the time anyway, carefully of course, I just can't remember where I read it, thought it was CX, but they give the same test info as Easton. Anyway, thanks for the info...
 
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