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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The thread about snap shooting led to this . . .

Been thinking for awhile now about the striking similarities between Target Panic and Mission Saturation.

Take a radically intensively trained person - say a search & rescue chopper pilot - and there will be a point where the introduction of even the slightest variable will cause all that hardwired neuromuscular matrix to lock up solid, a phenomenon sometimes known as Mission Saturation. The results are often fatal.

The disconnect seems to occur because the more dominant the neuromuscular cadence is, the less ability the individual has to "think out of the box", thus the saturation point of lockup and the inability to option-think outside of it to break out of it.

This - by the way - stands in contrast to the "chi" of martial arts that emphasises an "unfocused" yet razor sharp 360 degree situational awareness as a trigger for response. The response itself is, however, a similar neuromuscular cadence only achieved through intense discipline. I note this because TP or Mission Saturation don't appear to be a problem even at the highest levels of martial arts competition. This sort of awareness seems particularly difficult for the Western mind to encompass.

I'm not saying that the two are the same nor do I have a magic bullet of a TP antidote. Just food for thought and/or comment.

Regards,

Salskov
 
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I understand your comparison to a point. But in your scenario if you mess up you get your but kicked or you die. In archery if you mess up the worse that can happen is you lose an arrow. I think if more people looked at archery for what it is, a game less people would have target panic. Just my 1cents worth. Cool thought though.
 

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"Take a radically intensively trained person - say a search & rescue chopper pilot - and there will be a point where the introduction of even the slightest variable will cause all that hardwired neuromuscular matrix to lock up solid, a phenomenon sometimes known as Mission Saturation. The results are often fatal."

I know something about being intensively trained and, with all due respect, simply don't agree with the above quote. That is not to say that an intensively trained individual can't or won't fail in a critical mission…BUT… it's not because of the excessive data input IMO. It's because the mission goal has been forsaken, likely due to compromising it with "other" input.

This isn't all that different from TP, which simply is an individuals mental attempt to "digest" two thoughts simultaneously. Our minds like our eyes are only able to clearly digest/focus on a single thing at a time…. So, the archer who tries to "focus" on aiming and "pulling" simultaneously is doomed to failure… i.e., TP… Just at that intensively trained person is, who can't or won't make a single decision which should be "the goal" directed.

My thoughts on the matter.

Tom
 
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