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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a local guy who has one,,but I have no idea if this is a good bow or not. He wants $150 for it..its 60lbs @28" Here`s some pics


 

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thats a 2000 model. it's not the very best bow we ever made but it's a good solid performer and a lot of people like them.
the price is certainly fair.
 

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Had one way back, good, mild-rd longbow that is still in active service in other hands.Ive always liked Martins, well designed, straightforward performers with nothing too fancy to take into the woods and a great price/quality-ratios.:2cents:

r.mika
 

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I have hunted with Martin bows a lot, (and still do), both recurves and long bows. They have always impressed me with good quality at a decent price, and excellent speed. At $150. bucks, if your looking for a heavier hunting bow, thats a pretty good buy.
 

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thats a decent price for a decent bow. BUT I'd advise you not to buy it. I looked back at your other posts and have the impression that you are fairly new to traditional archery.

60# is too much draw weight if it is your only bow. I'm not doubting that you can draw it at all, but you really need a lighter weight bow to practice with and learn the good habits and build the extremely critical skills that you need to become proficient in before you take to the woods.

It IS a good price and the bow is a good solid hunting bow, just not right to learn on.

Now if you were to take advantage of the price and buy it now and that the fortitude to put it away out of sight, pick up a lighter less expensive bow, and do your skill building, THEN use the Bushmaster for hunting it might work out well. but that takes a lot of determination and fortitude, doubt I could manage it. I'd have it out and be shooting it, figuring "a little won't hurt" and pretty soon be back to short drawing, not anchoring solidly and snap shooting with form and accuracy all shot to hell. obviously this is my opinion, but I hate to see a guy make the mistakes I'd made and suffered from.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thats a decent price for a decent bow. BUT I'd advise you not to buy it. I looked back at your other posts and have the impression that you are fairly new to traditional archery.

60# is too much draw weight if it is your only bow. I'm not doubting that you can draw it at all, but you really need a lighter weight bow to practice with and learn the good habits and build the extremely critical skills that you need to become proficient in before you take to the woods.

It IS a good price and the bow is a good solid hunting bow, just not right to learn on.

Now if you were to take advantage of the price and buy it now and that the fortitude to put it away out of sight, pick up a lighter less expensive bow, and do your skill building, THEN use the Bushmaster for hunting it might work out well. but that takes a lot of determination and fortitude, doubt I could manage it. I'd have it out and be shooting it, figuring "a little won't hurt" and pretty soon be back to short drawing, not anchoring solidly and snap shooting with form and accuracy all shot to hell. obviously this is my opinion, but I hate to see a guy make the mistakes I'd made and suffered from.
So, what weight do you think I should start with? Any particular bows I should try to find used?
 

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A lot depends on your interests and what you intend to do with the bow once you become proficient with it. I'd figure that out and then look for a decent quality used bow in the low to mid 40 pound range.

We have had some threads archived In the "TradTalk Classics" in the sticky at the top of this page, you should find so really useful information there, Its like a personalized encyclopedia of archery.


I personally like the Martin Bows but there are also others that are also good. I think that the Martin Savanna, used is a GREAT introductory bow for someone interested in longbows---in the right draw weight range. A fair number of guys go for the Bear Montana, the "Bear" name is Magic right??? my personal experience with several of them has been on the sad side of disappointing. I do not recommend them, but other opinions exist and WMMV

Right now the higher poundage bows are showing up a lot in the used market with higher prices for midweight bows. some of it is generational shift as older archers who grew up with heavy-bow-itus are parting with their bows and trading down for lighter ones as time and wearing shoulders take their toll.
a 60 pound Bushmaster for 150 sounds about right to me, as would a 60 pound Savannah for a hundred or a hundred and fifty more. Same bows in the 40-45 pound range might be half again as much. This is based on what I have seen at various show in the used bow booths.

If recurves are of more interest that opens up a whole different discussion
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
A lot depends on your interests and what you intend to do with the bow once you become proficient with it. I'd figure that out and then look for a decent quality used bow in the low to mid 40 pound range.

We have had some threads archived In the "TradTalk Classics" in the sticky at the top of this page, you should find so really useful information there, Its like a personalized encyclopedia of archery.

I personally like the Martin Bows but there are also others that are also good. I think that the Martin Savanna, used is a GREAT introductory bow for someone interested in longbows---in the right draw weight range. A fair number of guys go for the Bear Montana, the "Bear" name is Magic right??? my personal experience with several of them has been on the sad side of disappointing. I do not recommend them, but other opinions exist and WMMV

Right now the higher poundage bows are showing up a lot in the used market with higher prices for midweight bows. some of it is generational shift as older archers who grew up with heavy-bow-itus are parting with their bows and trading down for lighter ones as time and wearing shoulders take their toll.
a 60 pound Bushmaster for 150 sounds about right to me, as would a 60 pound Savannah for a hundred or a hundred and fifty more. Same bows in the 40-45 pound range might be half again as much. This is based on what I have seen at various show in the used bow booths.

If recurves are of more interest that opens up a whole different discussion
well, I don`t know the advantages of a recurve as opposed to longbow or vice versa. The other one is Deflex Reflex or is it Reflex Deflex? Either way, this very good shooter I have become friendly with at the range says he feels they are the best of both worlds. Any thoughts?
 

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Re: "Custom" Bushmaster Longbow

reflex-deflex is very simply a term descriptive of the way the limbs on some longbows curve when strung. typically in an arc from the grip toward the string the slightly away from the string on the outer portion of the limb towards the ends. they are also called "hybrid" or "modern" longbows. On a longbow it means the bow has a very slight curvy shape so it shares a limited amount of similarity to a recurve bow. It may or may not have an effect on the desirability or shoot-ability of a given bow. In some cases it can be a decided improvement, in others it is little more than a marketing phrase
 

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R/D longbows are my favorite. It is kind of like combining the best of the both. I agree that 60# is too much to start with no matter how strong someone is. You'll be using muscles you don't use very often. The worst thing a new archer can do it start off overbowed (shooting a bow too heavy). It's hard to develop consistent form. Plus, you'll have a lot more fun shooting a lighter bow in the beginning. I agree that a decent used bow around 40#'s would be a good starting point.
 

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They're are pros and cons to each. A recurve is nice cause its shorter, and easier to move through the woods with. Down side is they are noiser and have more hand shock.
a long bow is good because they are quiet, little hand shock, and light weight. Downside they are long and not as easy to maneuver through the woods.
I prefer a long bow to a recurve for a starter bow. 40-45# is good.
I have a Martin Savannah long bow i'm selling that's at 45#. I started out shooting it and am glad I did. Made me a better shooter. Good luck.
 
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