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They are great rifles and a real piece of American history. They use a clip which holds 8 rounds and you really should learn the takedown and cleaning if you do not already know? You are in a special status if you own one! Grats
 

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One of the best Canadian firearms of all time :p

-Grant
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I got mine from a gun show for $1000. The guy got it thru the CMP so it came with a manual on how ro tear em down. I'm lookin more toward wht kind of ammo is safe to shoot thru it?
 

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They are just as safe today as they were back then. I had one, and like a fool sold it. It came from the Springfield Armory, with all matching serial numbers, I won't say what I got for it, but it was a mistake to sell it. Run whatever ammunition you want through it, as long as it meets factory specs. Mine was as accurate as my modern sporting rifle. It was fun to shoot, but a bit expensive. I'm not a hard core gun collector, so I really had no use for it. Pretty heavy to carry around in the woods, and I prefer a scoped rifle today.

What kind of tips are you looking for? They are pretty simple to operate, tear down, and reassemble. But pay attention to be sure you can put it back together. When mine arrived, it came to my dad's house. I came in at noon, and he had it torn down completely. I almost had a heart attack. I asked him what in the hell he thought he was doing. He said aw I just wanted to see if I could remember how to do it. I said you had better remember how to do it! He was a decorated WW II vet and combat marksman, but this was in the late 80's. He got it back together, and I told him not to do that again as he was getting kinda forgetful. He just laughed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First things first. I thank your dad for his service to his country. I've read that if the pressure is too high then it can bend the op rod. A occurance i would like to avoid. :)
 

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No standard Remington 06 hunting rounds........http://www.milsurps.com/showthread.php?t=28521

Scroll down a few posts on the link.
Military .30-'06 ammunition and SAAMI-standard civilian loadings will almost certainly produce similar chamber pressures which are at or below the safe "proof" pressure for any given rifle in good condition. Fine so far, but in the M1 "Garand," chamber pressure is not the problem; it's pressure at the gas port -- a couple of inches back from the muzzle -- that governs.

Let's assume two loadings, one of "slow" powder, and one of "fast" powder, neither of which exceeds the SAAMI chamber pressure standard when fired in our rifle. ("Slow" and "fast" in this context refer to the burning rates of the respective propellants.)

If the propellant (powder) has a too-slow burn rate, even if the chamber pressure is below SAAMI maximum, the pressure at the gas port will likely be too high, and may very well slam the operating rod to the rear hard enough to damage it: bend the rod or crack the piston, perhaps. It is also likely that the bolt will strike the inside of the receiver heel, which it is not supposed to do. Given enough time with what might be termed "overenthusiastic" ammunition, especially if combined with a weak operating rod spring, and the bolt can end up cracking the heel of the receiver. Yes, M1 receivers have been cracked -- a piece actually pounded loose -- under these conditions; the rifle doesn't "blow up" as that term is generally understood. (A damaged operating rod can be repaired or replaced, but a cracked receiver means that one has now become the proud owner of an unwieldy .30-caliber paperweight or a real nifty wall hanger. And no, a receiver so cracked cannot be safely welded back together; don't even think about it.)

Too fast a powder, given at-or-below-maximum allowable chamber pressure, probably won't do any damage. It's likely, however, that it won't generate enough pressure to reliably cycle the rifle's action. The action may appear to cycle, but faulty extraction and ejection or failure to load subsequent round(s) will probably occur. (It looks for all the world like a classic case of "short stroking," which is precisely what it is.) Granted, with most over-the-counter .30-'06 ammunition, low gas port pressure isn't a concern vis-a-vis physical damage, but it sure plays hob with the rifle's functioning.

Please note that neither of these phenomena are absolutely guaranteed: they may, in fact, be very rare. Can they happen? Surely. And people get run over by busses, too. Rare or not, in either case you have a nonfunctional rifle; I think you'll agree that neither condition qualifies as A Good Thing
 
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Basic tip if your new to its operation...watch your THUMB when loading. When I was about 13 I was given proper instruction...but apparently still had to learn the hard way.
 

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What Bow said....be careful what ammo you run through it, or get the adjustable gas plug.
They are sweet old rifles. I have several of them and they are one of my all time favorites. Most cases of "M1 thumb" come from not retracting the bolt smartly enough, leaving it sitting on the follower and in effect, creating a mouse trap. Use proper loading procedures and it's a non issue.
Another tip......M1's like grease. Most people run either Lubri-plate or Plasti-lube, although I'm sure there are others. I use Lubri-plate and it's good, but a lot of people say Plasti-lube is better (supposedly adopted as an improvement over Lubri-plate). Check the CMP site for disassembly, cleaning, lube points, etc.
Congrats on the rifle...
 

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I was never around one, but my Dad was in France, Belgium and Germany in WW II, carried one everywhere he went, and he swore the Garand was one of the best guns he ever had his fingers on, period.
 
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OK, I stand corrected then. I shot it all through mine, and had no issues.
John......I've heard others say the same thing. I guess it's one of those things where the potential is there, especially with loadings utilizing heavy bullets. A buddy of mine has a low numbered 1903 (Rock Island) that's "technically" dangerous to shoot. But, his grandfather, father, and he himself have used it with no problems. Whoever eyeballed the heat treatment on that one must've got it right because it's held together all these years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Basic tip if your new to its operation...watch your THUMB when loading. When I was about 13 I was given proper instruction...but apparently still had to learn the hard way.
Yeah. Has that happen to me first time i shot it. Unpleasant to say the least. :)
 
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