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Civil but Disobedient
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I have used many scales to support my bow testing. I have also tested scales during the process. I had a Feather River. It was awful. I called the company are they were going to try to help calibrate it. I decided not to bother. I think I gave it away since I could not find it last time I looked.

My preference if the Easton Bow Scale which is no longer available. It is highly accurate and design to be used pulling a bow.

My second preference is the AWS PK-110. This is a very nice scale that has the features you want if you are making draw force curves.

Key features are that there is not an auto power off, and that you can set it for continuous measurement. It also supports peak weight if you are doing individual measurements.

If you are just measuring bows, a simple archery scale like the X-Spot does fine. It is plenty accurate and works well for taking individual measurements since it measures peak weight.

It is not a good scale if you are making draw force curves.

I would suggest my design for a quantum electrodynamic scale, but it might make Dan jealous.
 

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Digital scale. Used not quite full gallon jugs to test accuracy when purchased and after I dropped it once, filled using a large graduated cylinder holding up to a liter, considering temperature/density, etc. It was less than +/-1# accuracy at 32# using this "standard", and is highly repeatable/precise when used with a jig with a pulley and hold down for handle so I pull same amount and same way ever time.

I was using my Grandfathers scale that was used on our family farm for weighing out bags of potato's, seed, etc. when I started back into archery a decade ago. This worked well enough for me to see "is this limb that feels out of whack vs. another marked similarly really different, or is it my imagination?" Then I got strong enough to want one with higher capacity, and took some inspiration from the Six Sigma guys here like Hank and did a few draw force curves.

But I care for the spring scale.. and it hangs in our kitchen with pride.
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Not arguing with you just telling it from my end and I have 2 here that are 2 years apart that read the same across 3 different bows just now. I draw til my clicker goes off and draw at the same speed.
 
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RYAN, good call. Reading this again, I just always assumed the York plates were accurately weighed, but I bet they are off to some degree.
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Digital scale. Used not quite full gallon jugs to test accuracy when purchased and after I dropped it once, filled using a large graduated cylinder holding up to a liter, considering temperature/density, etc. It was less than +/-1# accuracy at 32# using this "standard", and is highly repeatable/precise when used with a jig with a pulley and hold down for handle so I pull same amount and same way ever time.

I was using my Grandfathers scale that was used on our family farm for weighing out bags of potato's, seed, etc. when I started back into archery a decade ago. This worked well enough for me to see "is this limb that feels out of whack vs. another marked similarly really different, or is it my imagination?" Then I got strong enough to want one with higher capacity, and took some inspiration from the Six Sigma guys here like Hank and did a few draw force curves.

But I care for the spring scale.. and it hangs in our kitchen with pride.
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That's exactly how I use mine. Even if it's dead on accurate the graduations aren't really fine enough to get very accurate. It will tell me "these two bows are marked the same but this one feels harder to draw back, is it real or just my imagination?" 😄

I'll pick up something better one of these days, but for now it's gud 'nuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
While we're going nuts on ideas, could somehow (for no better reason) use a standard pressure scale. Not how much a bow takes to pull, but how much it pushes. With a serial port could do readings throughout the draw curve.
 

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Trad is for stumpin
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I have used a standard Hanson /Viking 100# spring scale. Calibrated it by using a sealed 50# plastic bag of salt after having it weighed at the USPS office in town. The scale does have an adjustment screw that was used to make scale read the same as USPS scale with the bag hanging from it.
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Easton once offered a digital hand held Scale that came with a serial output port and windows software to do draw force curves and plot them.

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Discussion Starter · #38 · (Edited)
Don't buy the analog scale in the OP. It's junk. Did what @Bucco921 said and grabbed a simple digital scale from Amazon, with 'hold' function. It came in yesterday and I found that exactly as the Oly archer said, I'm pulling 3-4lbs heavier than I thought.

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All bows tested (3 of them) are almost 4lb heavier than expected, which makes sense as regards the arrows I've been making for them. All needing stiffer than what the 3 Rivers Calculator or other charts/calculators said they should be before getting this scale. Explains the 250 spine I ended up needing to bareshaft my Black Hunter Longbow which now weighs 67lb at my 30.5" AMO DL according to the scale. It also means my Black Hunter shipped with limbs ~3lb heavier than marked.

My ILF hunting setup (44lb Nika N3s mediums with 19" F261) now weighs the same and perfectly to spec (rated for 25" riser) as it did on a friend's digital scale: 50lb @ 28" bolted down. This matches what Draven saw on his 19" for the 44lb Nika's, exactly to spec pound for pound at 28". They were coming in really light on the analog.

I checked the digital scale with 1.5L of water, and will test with 4x of them. 1.5L of water at room temp is 1.5kg and the scale measured 1.56kg, which is about ~25g off given the bottle and cap weight when empty.

PSA: The Feather River Sports analog scale is junk.
 

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Bart Harmeling
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I have a Feather River. I filled up a 5 gal bucket with water and weighed it on the bathroom scale which has been pretty accurate. 43.6lbs Then on the Feather River I did 3 weighs and averaged 43.5lbs. So mine is pretty good there. Then I added rocks to the bucket for a weight of 56.4lbs on the bathroom scale. The Feather River came up with and average of 55lbs. I suspect that as the weight continues the less accuracy there would be. My recurves are in the low 40lb range so it works for me. Not so accurate on my compound which is low to mid 50's.
 
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