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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am thinking about investing in a cheap set of recurve ilf limbs (something about 110-130 new) and I have a few questions. The first is, can I expect more performance compared to my Samick sage? Also, do most ilf limbs stack the standard 2-3lbs per inch? I want about a 55lb at 32”, so I would think I want about 45lb limbs. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!


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My non technical response is in the next post.

Stacking is when the limb starts to experience accelerated weight gain. The 2 to 3 pound rule applies to the limbs prior to the onset of stacking.

How much a limb picks up depends on the weight of the limb. There is no universal number that applies to the weights of all limbs.

The standard rule of thumb on stacking applies to a limb in about the high 30 to 40 pound range. Using a linear draw force curve approximation as an example:

Draw length=32 inches
Weight at 28 inches=X
Brace height=8 1/4 inches from deepest part of grip
Brace from back of bow= 8 1/4 + 1 3/4 inches= 10 inches
Total inches pulled at 32 inches of draw=32-10=22 inches
Total inches pulled at 38 inches of draw=28-10=18 inches

For a linear draw force curve the slope is X pounds/18 inches.
Pulling the same bow 32 inches with no stack will be X pounds + (32-28)*(X pounds/18 inches)

To get a slope of 2 pounds per inch:
2=X pounds/18
X=18*2=36 pound bow

To get a slope of 3 pounds per inch
3=X pounds/18
X=3*18=54 pound bow

So this is what you get with no stacking. That means that stacking will give you higher numbers than these.

It makes sense that the heavier the bow, the more weight it will pick up for each additional inch pulled.

And when stacking occurs, it will pick up even more.

The linear draw force curve is good for looking at relationships. It is not a way to accurately calculate the weight of a bow.

Few bows actually have a linear draw force curve. Also, there are many factors that influence a bows performance characteristics.

Unfortunately, pictures were lost when Tradtalk upgraded so I am linking to my ArcheryTalk post on the linear draw force curve and the more refined polynomial model.

(26) Linear approximation of the draw force curve | Archery Talk Forum
(26) Polynomial draw force curve model--Simulating bow performance | Archery Talk Forum
 

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As far a comparing to a Sage, unfortunately, I have not been able to run a Sage through my test procedure. It is on the top of my list if I can get ahold of one after I get my test equipment set up again.

Generally, what I have found is that lower cost limbs stack more, but it depends on the limbs.

Like you, I have a 32 inch draw length. I typically test out to 33 inches for a 70 inch bow. Less if the bow is shorter. The Sage is a terrible bow for a 32 inch draw.

While I have not tested one, I have tried to pull one. I feel like I am hitting a wall and the bow is about to explode.

I don't think you are going to find anything that will feel good unless you go to a much longer bow or a bow that is specifically designed for longer draws.

Low cost ILF limbs do not fall in that category. Getting 55 at 32 inches will be a crap shoot. To give you an example, I have two longbows that give about the same holding weight at 32 inches.

One is marked 30 pounds and the other is 35. The 30 pounder is a low cost Samick. The 35 is a custom Falco.

The most important question is what you are using the bow for. If target shooting then you should be looking for at least a 70 inch bow. Longer is better. I current shoot a 74 inch bow.

If you are hunting (I am not a hunter) then you need to really understand how short you really need to go for your situation. Don't shoot a short bow just because everyone else does. Most folks don't have 32 inch draw lengths.

28 to 32 is a big change. It does not seem so large until you consider that you are pulling from about 10 inches of brace measured from the back of the bow.

That means that you are pulling 22 inches at 32 inches of draw, compared to 18 at 28. That is a 22% increase in how much you are pulling the limbs.
 

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I have a Samick Discovery and bought their long carbon foam limbs in 35 and 45lbs and they are an upgrade from my Samick Sage limbs, a little smoother draw and less stacking at 29”. I wanted a set of 40lb limbs so I bought a set of TradTech long Blackmax 2.0 and I am very happy with them. They draw nice and just seem a little faste, they will be my hunting limbs.
I believe some limbs get a bad rap for stacking from some that are just over bowed.
 

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Definitely recommend long limbs for a draw length that long. The Galaxy line at Lancaster Archery Supply is pretty good and is my go-to for inexpensive limbs. Stopped using TradTech limbs due to the unpredictability of their non-standard ILF weight measurement.
 

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Don't take this wrong, but VERY few guys draw 32". Have to measured to be sure as inaccurate measurement will throw off your arrow spine calculations.
If you do, then your power stroke will be great.
In compounds, I have a 30" draw but with recurves, I draw 28"
Watch for a set of XL limbs too is you don't want a long riser.
 

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The Samick Sage is reputed to "hit the wall" in terms of stack @ 28". I don't think this can be escaped with inexpensive limbs. Basically I did the same thing you're asking about: $120 retail 20 lb (rated on 25" riser) WNS limbs on a 17" riser - I get 27 lbs @ 27" . These limbs stack but it's tolerable at that weight & DL.

I think at a 32" DL, stacking is likely to be objectionable with bargain limbs. One solution may be a long riser & limbs to increase the bow's AMO length. Maybe @ 70 or 72" stack will be tolerable.
 

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Will16-
I'd put it this way....if you're pulling a Sage to 32", you're probably going to really enjoy shooting a 25" riser with long limbs. You will notice a smoother draw with less dramatic stacking at full draw. I would think that 44# long limbs should get you close to your 55# goal.
 

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I have a sage I picked up for beginners to use, and a 31.5" draw. As others observed.. pulling Sage past like 28-29" feels like hitting a wall. Just about any long ILF limbs on a bigger riser are going to feel great. A relatively short 21" riser would add 4" vs. a Sage, and maybe different geometry, etc. etc. A 25" riser would absolutely work with modest stack.

44# @28" is a very good guesstimate on what to pick to hit 55# at 32"

Were I you, I would not buy anything. Find somewhere / someone to shoot various bows with, get a feel for them. At the end of the day you can power through stack somewhat, so you might find you prefer a shorter bow for hunting and a bit more stack, or ... etc.

Guys have, in past, put out a thread "anyone near me" threads with success. If you are near Houston I have a ton of bows you can try.
 

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The materials the limbs are built in that price range are not different than what you have on your Sage. I doubt you will ever see a difference with a 28" DL. For a 32" DL no matter the price of conventional limbs you will be in the stacking area - the shorter bow, the harder on fingers will be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Don't take this wrong, but VERY few guys draw 32". Have to measured to be sure as inaccurate measurement will throw off your arrow spine calculations.
If you do, then your power stroke will be great.
In compounds, I have a 30" draw but with recurves, I draw 28"
Watch for a set of XL limbs too is you don't want a long riser.
I draw a 32” carbon to carbon arrow to the front of the riser, so depending on where you measure from, but either way it’s longer than most


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If a long draw archer finds that longs stack too much for their tastes, there are a few manufacturers that make extra long ILF limbs as well. Border, Uukha, and Dryad(?) come to mind. Of course, XLs come with a little higher price tag.
 

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I should have mentioned this in last post.. if you cannot find someone to let you try stuff- the Galaxy Silver Star limbs have worked pretty well for me at my 31.5" draw.

If you decide to pay a bit more (~$400), as Dave mentions- XL ILF limbs are an idea to pursue. I did a review on ArcheryTalk of the new XL sx50 from UUKHA a while back. On a 25" riser I found they were 100% linear from 28-32".

More detail (lots and lots more) at link below:
 
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