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I have been shooting g traditional for about two years. I prefer shooting woodies with feathers off the shelf. I shoot a dozen arrows maybe 5 times a week. I am seeing significant ware on my feathers. Is this normal, or is there something about my shelf, or bow that is eroding my feathers? I see the most wear in the feather that is passing my riser/shelf area.

how much life are folks getting out of their feathers? What is the best way to remove the fletchings to start over.
Thanks
 

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Hmm. my guess is that your nock point may be low, or your spine is on the stiff side (or both).

On the other hand. I have shot arrows with really shabby looking feathers, or completely missing a feather without much effect on my scores. The questionable arrows are always in, or very close to the group (20yds inside).
 

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Losing arrows since 1966
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...I don’t shoot wood arrows, but any feather wear is in your tune…
… an ILF can be tuned so that you have almost zero fletching wear…
… a one piece, off the shelf, with wood arrows… some times the best you can do, is the best you can do… if it is a cut to center bow, and you are satisfied with your arrow flight, I would consider it normal wear and tear… and a kitchen potato peeler, or butter knife will scrape fletchings… no rocket surgery involved...
 

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My feathers can be shot literally years with no wear unless they start going too deep into the target. Off the shelf the wear is basically zero and ill shoot the same arrow 200- 300 times a week.
 

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My vanes and feathers last pretty well the life of the arrow unless I start shooting through stuff.
Im pretty new to it all too, but when I see fletching contact I get to thinking I aint set up right in spine, nock, brace.
 

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j-san = Jason
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I've been shooting a 2-fletch set-up for the past 8 years or so now and haven't had to replace any feathers as a result of wear. I orient the nock so the feathers are at a 1:30 and 7:30 position when viewed from the nock end. That allows them to completely clear the riser with room to spare. It is also nice that is is more economical with feathers since I use one less for each arrow. Downside is they have less stabilizing ability than 3 or 4-fletch and any damage to one feather can result in more erratic flight and noise while in flight. I use 5" long shield cut feathers to get more overall surface area to offset the one less feather. However, if you get the bare shaft tune down pat, it isn't a problem.

For removing feathers, I use a fletching removal tool that is essentially a blade with a curved notch to fit around the shaft and it cuts off the fletch as you push it along the shaft. I shoot carbon arrows so those can survive the blade without any issues. Not so sure about wood shafts. Maybe it can be done with careful guidance of the blade along the surface.
 

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Some shooters prefer to put the cock feather in at 90 degrees so the other two miss the shelf completely, but you'll still see wear on the cock feather. I have arrows with worn fletchings but change them when the need changing. It's not that difficult, and once you get the hang of it, you can be very proactive.
 

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So many factors; form, your nok height, rest material etc

for example my feathers dont last long on a velcro rest vs a patch of hide i got from my taxi buddy

That said, a couple years for feathers is about right if you shoot a fair amount.
 
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