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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-19361350

I hope the link works ..

"A University of Leicester archaeological team is digging in a Leicester car park where they think he may have been buried.

King Richard III was killed at Bosworth in 1485 and his body taken to a Franciscan Friary in the city.

Over time, the exact location of the grave has been lost.

The project team said their work is "the first ever search for the lost grave of an anointed King of England".


I might take a drive over on Saturday as see what's happening ... It's only 40 miles from my home
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Looks like they may have found him .....
 

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I got the truth straight from the source........

Of course we will require pictures Phil........
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I want to see the arrowhead stuck in his spine .... shot in the back ...and him being a king 'an all ...
 

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A new look a Richard III

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/sep/15/king-villains-richard-iii

Excerpt -

Richard III, the great villain of English history, is due a makeover

The discovery of a skeleton under a Leicester car park has reignited interest in the maligned monarch

To the headline writers, he's become "the king in the car park". To Shakespeare, he was the "bottled spider". But 527 years after he died on Bosworth Field, he has become part of the national conversation again. Somewhere between a Mondeo monarch and a pantomime villain lies the figure of Richard III, one of the most disputed kings in British history.

A thrilling palimpsest of folklore, drama, archaeology and Tudor propaganda means that we will probably never begin to approach the truth about the reign and character of the man Shakespeare painted as "rudely stamp'd… deformed, unfinish'd". A monster of sadism, duplicity and cunning, much worse than bad king John, more cruel than Henry VIII and less fit than Charles I for the English throne, Richard III is by far the most reviled entry in a catalogue of sovereigns not exactly renowned for their grace, distinction, or humanity.
 

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Next find...Jimmy Hoffa
 

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Showed a reconstruction of his face on USA. Kinda looked like Redbow :) only taller
 

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Phil, I've been following the story as much as possible. It looks like the "arrowhead" turned out to be a rusted up Roman era nail they uncovered when the hole was dug to deposit his corpse.

It is an amazingly serendipitous find. One must remember that they were simply searching for evidence of the ruins of the building (cloister area?) he was buried in. they were not actually searching for HIM. Not even in an archaeological wet dream would you consider a find like that. You'd have better odds with the national lottery
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi Wayne
They've pretty much hit the jackpot as you say. I've been over to the site a couple of times and spoke to some of the student diggers. Of course they're all cock-a-hoop that they've found Henry's remains but, some of the other stuff coming out of the site is also interesting.
 

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I think its neat, historically valuable, and I'm sure the local tourist council is wetting themselves with pleasure. Now if they could just give the battle site a good going over with modern hi-tech archaeological methods-----we'd REALLY learn something.
 

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Time for an update. Forensic details confirm the history of the death of Richard III.

Last moments

Either of the penetrating head wounds would have been fatal very quickly, Hainsworth said. The findings mesh with near-contemporary accounts of the battle, which hold that Richard III's horse had become mired in mud, forcing him to dismount. He had either removed or lost his helmet, leaving his head and face vulnerable.

"He was surrounded, probably by a number of people with medieval arms," Hainsworth said. "He was a warrior, he was a knight, he was a trained fighter, but he would have seen other people die on the battlefield, so he would be very aware of, if you like, what was in store for him."

The researchers can't say for sure in what order the wounds were delivered, but historical accounts hold that Richard was kneeling with his head bent forward when the fatal wounds were delivered - a tale consistent with the large wounds to the base of the skull. Richard's face was actually less mutilated than many battle casualties of the time, Hainsworth said. The choice to spare his face was likely deliberate, she said, as the victors would want to leave no doubt that it was really Richard they had killed.


http://news.yahoo.com/king-richard-iiis-final-moments-were-quick-brutal-231734860.html
 
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