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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Folks,

I am not even sure where to start. I have been reading threads on different forums about traditional bows and recurve bows without understanding much. I am not sure what to correctly call this type of bow either, I always though it was called recurve but I have seen traditional bow used as well so forgive me if I am wrong.

I have been an on again, off again (Mostly off) compound bow shooter for 10 years. I have been wanting to start shooting a recurve bow for a few years but don't have the green to buy to much hardware and fail at it. So I need to take a decent shot at something good the first time around. I may find out from here that is not really possible but I can always dream.

I have seen the terms ILF, plunger, riser, and limbs to name a few and I don't know what all of these are. I get the limbs, pretty simple right? I am pretty sure the riser is the thing that limbs hook onto but the other two I'm not sure.

I am about 6'1'' with I believe a draw length of about 31 inches but it's been a while so could be wrong. I am just not sure where to start when it comes to having a draw length that long. Is a recurve better for any situation? Is it compariable to a compound bow as far as killing power and shotting distances? Do I use the same type of arrows with a recurve that I used with my compound bow? Do I look at getting a bow you can break down or one that is all one unit?

I have looked online at Martin, Hoyt, and Black Widow Bows just to name a few.

I could come up with 20 more questions but I am sure I have went over my limit already. Just any advice and tips would be appreciated on how to get started.

Thank you.
 

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One Shot One Kill
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Which ever bow you start with start with a low poundage bow and work up I would recomend 35-45# @30 to start and then work up to more poundage after you have found your form and feel comfortable.

If I where you I would look for a warf bow (older compound riser converted to take ilf limbs) in the classifieds or contact sam dunham about building you one...the are nice if you are looking to transition from a compound heck they used to be a compound riser so the weight and feel is really close to what you would be used to.

You can use the same type of arrows and even vanes if you don't mind shooting off an elevated rest or you can shoot off the shelf with feathers.

The key to shooting a recurve or longbow is having a light enough bow that you can shoot it without wearing your self out and getting sloppy with your form.

The dedication it takes to shoot a stick bow well is just that dedication and you can get as good as you put in back out.]


Hope that helps a little

Jordan
 

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I would say try and get to an archery shop, and handle a few bows. That way you can get an idea for what feels right for you. Also there are plenty of clubs and shoots that you may want to visit, so as to talk with and get to know some of the archers in your community. They can be most helpful with getting you started. Your arrows from your compound will likely work, but they wont shoot as well as arrows matched for your new equipment.
 

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"traditional" is a catchall phrase with a range of meaning and hair-splitting nuances with in those.

If you think of it as basically any bow that is hand-drawn, hand-held and hand-released, with only one string and without any cams/gears/wheels or other mechanical devices to aid the archer you will be pretty well oriented.

Such a bow consists of a midsection with a handle, commonly referred to as a riser, and two limbs to which the ends of the string are attached.

There are two basic forms which we commonly call "longbows" and "recurves". In its most basic form a longbow is a fairly straight stick that is bent in a more or less continuous arc when the shorter-in-length string is attached to either end. Some times the mid/handle section is flattened a bit and had additional thicker material added to provide a stronger stiffer grip area. the form a longbow takes when strung is rather like an elongated capital "D". The long-bow is what most people would call a "Robin-Hood Bow" since the old English longbow or "war-bow" of the Middle Ages is almost its stereotype.

a recurve, again in its most rudimentary form is similar, a long stick that is bowed when its ends are connected with a shorter string. The difference is that on a recurve both ends "recurve" away from the string in the last part of their length. the string when attached to the notches or "nocks" at each end of the limbs actually lays tightly along the outer few inches of the limb ends. the bow usually seen in Valentine's Day greeting card and related art is a highly stylized form of a recurve bow. The recurve adds some power so that a shorter bow that would be handier on horseback or in brush or other close quarters, still has the power of the longer long-bow

This represents the most extreme and simplest word picture of the two types of bows. In reality there are many many variations of configurations on a continuum line between the two extremes.

Learning to shoot a bow with any degree of satisfying accuracy requires mastering a set of mental and physical skills that you might compare to learning the proper golf swing. To do so correctly means starting with a light draw weight bow so that you can master the mind/body skills by drilling them into the "muscle-memory" with out having to fight a heavy draw weight at the same time. It will involve a time and effort commitment; and our collective experience has shown that transitional archers who are willing to drop back 15, 20, or more pounds from their compound bow weight will be comfortable putting the in time and the number of shots fired to develop the required skills. They are the ones who actually follow through and become successful traditional archers.

Just two more things for right now:
First, If you look at the top of the TradTalk main Forum page you will see a section labeled "Sticky: Trad Talk Classics" or something like that. It is sort of a learning center or encyclopedia that contains a carefully collected and organized past threads and discussions that will cover an awful lot of the questions you have and a bunch that have not occurred to you yet.
Over the years this forum has been in existence we have had a lot of men and women present questions and situations like yours. Most have found that spending some time reading through those "classics" discussions is time very well invested. We stand collectively ready to answer your questions as they arise of course, but spending some time reading there will save you a lot of time and confusion.

Second. In terms of equipment, there is a huge variety out there covering a wide range of the different bow types styles and costs. As was mentioned above we have a tendency to suggest starting with a "Warf" bow (Look that up in the "classics" for further info, but basically it is a modified recycled metal compound bow riser/handle that will accept a range of different sets of limbs) It is clearly not the only way one can proceed but it does offer a cost effective way to get started since one can start with used/recycled equipment and then add other, more powerful, more costly, higher quality limbs and accessories as ones interests and skills unfold.

good luck on your quest and continue to ask questions as they arise.
 
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Juredd1, welcome to the forum.
Wayne did a nice job of intro there.
 

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Pete
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Welcome Juredd1, you will get great advice here.
 

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Barefaced tightropewalker
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Welcome to the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I appreciate the welcome notes that I received and the time dedicated to providing me with some great guidance on where to get started. I also appreciate the willingness to help me out with any future questions I might have.
 

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You will never be short on good advice here Juredd1, these guys are a good bunch who know their stuff.
I am fairly new to the iLF thing but it is the way to go, find a riser that fits you nicely then look at limbs. You should start light to build your form then trade up as you need to in both quality and poundage.
The Tradtech Pinnacle2 with BlackMax woodcore limbs would be a low cost solid starting place IMO.
 

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Lots of great info out there. I would look for a used 64-66" recurve that scales 35#s or there abouts as it will be around 45#s or so at your draw. You can find old Bears,Roots,Pearsons,Brownings,Martins for around 100-150 bucks and get yourself started. When you get the bow, guys on here and other Trad sites will be able to get close on arrows and the spine you need to shoot!! If ya want PM me with a ph. number and I can help as I am sure many others can too! Shawn
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't want to start naming names as far as thanks go because I'll leave off someone but I very much appreciate the additional comments and LORD willing I will be back in touch if I can keep up my motivation. I will attempt to go through the TradTalk Classics to see if I can some additional info as suggested.

Thanks again.
 
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