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I started shooting in 1957. Going on 71 yrs old. Few years ago I had Rod's clinic. There I learned about the form training aid. Picked up a lot of knowledge from the form that I would have never learned.

I have never been such a good shot. Not in class of our best shots are but very consistent.

I guess my only question is why so late in life? LOL.

If you get some years of competition left.... do it now. You are going to surprise yourself how good you can get. I was never in a competition group. I was a hunter. You now are among some of the best shots in the States. Go, for it now :)

 

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Discussion Starter #2
You may say not a competitor. That is to me saying you are not a good shot and don't want to be. There is one place to learn to be a good shot... competition. Go for it
 

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I much agree rusty, with both the quality of archers here and that competition can "sharpen the sword" so to speak for a hunter. I shot competitively for a few years when I first started though it was many years ago. At 59 I started shooting 3D again and even at my low tier I've realized that the mindset learned from competitive pressure transfers and helps with hunting pressure. I'm probably, truth be told, a better archer now than I was then.
 

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Started in archery about 4 and a half years ago. I'm very sorry I didn't start earlier. The intention is to improve and the age profile of some of the best on this forum gives me encouragement it's a not futile undertaking.
 

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You may say not a competitor. That is to me saying you are not a good shot and don't want to be. There is one place to learn to be a good shot... competition. Go for it
You need plenty of money to do this these days. Travel expense's and time to put into it or spend your money on hunting trips.
 

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Rusty, I couldn't agree with you more. I was 58, I think, when I first learned by coincidence that such a thing as competitive archery existed. I had always seemed to think that archery was something you did in the backyard and hoped no one was watching so you didn't get in trouble.:) I was invited to shoot 3D with a group of guys from Stephenville and have never stopped trying to gitbetr. In fact, the reason I started shooting spots was to improve my form for 3D. Funny how that turned out. I turn 67 this month and sure do wish I had started a long, long time ago. If anyone cares for my advice, I don't care how old or young you are, you will find others who will enjoy shooting alongside you.

I was hoping to see you at Louisville and I know that Bobby Graham would have enjoyed the competition you would have provided.
 
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Rusty, I couldn't agree with you more. I was 58, I think, when I first learned by coincidence that such a thing as competitive archery existed. I had always seemed to think that archery was something you did in the backyard and hoped no one was watching so you didn't get in trouble.:) I was invited to shoot 3D with a group of guys from Stephenville and have never stopped trying to gitbetr. In fact, the reason I started shooting spots was to improve my form for 3D. Funny how that turned out. I turn 67 this month and sure do wish I had started a long, long time ago. If anyone cares for my advice, I don't care how old or young you are, you will find others who will enjoy shooting alongside you.

I was hoping to see you at Louisville and I know that Bobby Graham would have enjoyed the competition you would have provided.
I hope that plan worked out for you Mike, it will come in handy next weekend.;)
 

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Rod's clinic at 53.....43 years late, but far, far better than never. Hope I have enough years left to get all I want out of it. Thanks Rusty for the thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You need plenty of money to do this these days. Travel expense's and time to put into it or spend your money on hunting trips.
At a national level yes. At a local level not so much. When the season starts I can find a shoot every weekend I have off. Each one of those clubs have a number of guys you are going to have to good to beat. I never fail to learn from shooting with the guys and gals
 

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Started shooting at 58, am now 60years old.

Even tho I fell bummed sometimes that I didn't get into it earlier, it is
encouraging to see guys still enjoying the sport up into their 80's.
Who knows I may still have 20 yrs of archery enjoyment ahead of me.

If Rod ever comes to SoCal for a clinic I would be all over it.

Max
 

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Rusty, you going to Vanderpool next month?
 

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The truly remarkable thing about this site is the number of top level archers that come here and are more than willing to help a total newbie - just look at the indoor nationals near as I can tell every trad class was won by guys who post here.

I tried 3D for the first time in 2010. It was a big day - first 3D, first time I saw a warf, first ILF, first Dala, first metal riser. I didn't know it at the time but I met a member here that day as well - Don Baker.

I stumbled in here looking to learn more about ILF. Rusty and Mike Westvange answered my very first post as I was figuring out what limbs and risers made a 66 inch bow (I thought that was stupid long at the time).

It's never too late to start and you never know how far you can take it.
 

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I spent many years as a hunter and occasional competition shooter.
Never much good at the comps but I got to meet other hunters.
Then 3D came in NZ and suddenly I was shooting distances that I could relate to,5 too 35 yards, and I got to be not to bad at it.
Now I look at 35 yards as holding us back, but I also realise those sorts of distances are bringing people like I was into the sport of competitions, and once the first step is taken those new people are our future so I keep my mouth shut about distances and other unimportant stuff
As much as I do understand what some hunters say about competition,I still believe competition is the best thing for any shooter that wants to improve.
I'm a better archer today than I was when I blew my back out and had to put my bow down for three years.
Most of that comes from Rod Jenkins,Ricky Welsh,Matt Potter,Rusty Crane,Byron Ferguson ect ect.
I've never met any of these people but I read and consider every word they post and every book or DVD they've produced.
I introduced the best 3D shooter I've ever seen to this sport about 5 years ago and today I stand in total awe of this guys natural skill.
I have people asking me for coaching, and I have no idea what to say to them because I'm still working on this thing myself.
Competition is definitely where it's at if you want to improve beyond the odd good shot and become consistent in more than just archery.
You see, all the good archers are also good people an that's something I never forget.

Great thread Rusty.
John.
 

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Rusty,

Some of us came late to the game. I spent my life climbing rocks and mountains before discovering archery after age 50. What attracted me to archery was that it was a new competitive challenge I could take on. Something I could work on getting better at, after I was past my peak as a climber. The fact that archery is decidedly safer than climbing, when pushed to the limit, is also a plus. I had tried golf, but after 15 years of lessons, I gave up. I would have given up sooner if it were not for my son being so good at it. Plus, our golf pro never raised his rates on his long term customers. Anyway, I am working myself back into climbing shape with the hopes of returning to some level of functional form. Archery, however, as a retirement sport, is looking better all the time. Maybe I will finally figure it out when I turn 71. Until then, there is always the senior games, where young folks bring us orange slices, cool drinks, and take care of setting up the targets for us, not to mention the goody bags filled with Geritol, pain relievers, and other age appropriate products.
 

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I spent most of my archery doing the same things over and over...trying to get some kinda repeatable form......

Worst thing I would do back then was start aiming when I saw an animal......don't know why..it wasn't the way I shot back then.....I just looked at the spot and tried to put it in there...of course it was always close quarters.

Then a live animal would show up and your mind goes into OVERDRIVE......instead of just doing what you always do....you start thinking...don't wound it......hit it in the boiler room...concentrate...see the hair....

AND THEN ..for me ...it was......aim.....and I would miss or not hit where I wanted.....never lost an animal or needed a second arrow but it wasn't where I wanted it.

Hell I had a braodside Yukon MOOSE at 10 yards on the bank of a road. I was walking down the road with my bow over my shoulder....going back to camp..morning hunt over with....looking forward to flyfishing for pike and lakers.

he never moved.....he just appeared there on the bank on the opposite side of the road.

I was hitting ping pong balls pretty consistantly at 30 yards and under in camp and here it was ....the Shot WE ALL DREAM OF......

Close quarters broadside moose.

I didn't pick a hair.......pulled and shot.....4x8 sheet of plywood......4x4 kill area....how can you miss.

the fletch rubbed his belly as it went under him.....he heard it hit the bushes behind him.....he just snorted and walked off.

I just stood there in amazement.....how the heck could I have missed him.

I don't think anything can truly prepare you for a hunting type shot accept actually doing it LOTS.

So I would practice and practice just being in the shot.....all the way until the arrow hit it's mark...worked great...

I took alot of animals that way...missed a few two...4 rams of which I still haven't taken one...OVER BOWED and that didn't help...but I didn't know much back then.

I took Rick welches course.....helped alot too. BUT it was wierd - went bear hunting and had this bear at 10 yards...I drew and for some strange reason I closed one EYE...never do that EVER....

But it was right after the clinic and had about 3 weeks of practice. Then I let down....re-grouped..pulled anchored and put my nose on the feather and let er rip...perfect shot.

I wanted to take Rods course but there wasn't any opportunity for me when he was so far away from the yukon. So I emailed him and asked if he woudl entertain the idea of coming to the yukon.

He agreed and I set forth getting things ready....securing money from participants etc.

It was a great clinic and I found out just how inconsitant I was but how more consitant I could be.

Then I went to Saudi for work.....had lots of time to practice and was kind of hybridding between Rod and Ricks methods......and leaning more towards Rods.

Now I am in Qatar - no bow and no practice...this might be the best thing that could have ever happened......when I get back into it this summer I won't have any bad habits having not shot for so long.....I have a nice set of 28# bb2's on a 19" riser I can use to start all over again too.

I am 56 and it will be a new lease on my bowhunting/archery life.

Cheers Jer
 

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You may say not a competitor. That is to me saying you are not a good shot and don't want to be. There is one place to learn to be a good shot... competition. Go for it
I am not disagreeing with you Rusty but the year was 1995 and I had a VHS tape made by Paul Brunner called Instinctive shooting and my first Recurve Bow. I learned what I knew from the tape and proceeded with that Bow and no competition with it to kill the best Buck and fill my Colorado Elk. I guess it was just that a Blind Hog managed to find an Acorn that year.

Now I am not anti competition in any way, I am just not able to go to competitions because I cannot afford to and if I had the extra money I'd likely save it for a hunting trip.

There is no regular competition shoots with in a 100 miles of me so I have to drive to them if I go. Now for you guys that have them down the street go but I can tell you that You don not have to have it to kill stuff in the woods with a Bow and Arrow.

I say this knowing that this is a big time Pro comp forum here and I respect everyone's drive to go and compete but there is no Red line saying it is not possible to Bowhunt without it.
 

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It gives me hope that there are many that started shooting later on in life and many that are on the top of their game and over 60.

Like many I wish I had found archery in my youth but better late than never. I am 53 but don't look a day over 60.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I Certainally have alter motives in this post. We need trad bulls eye shooters. That is a fact. When IFAA Nationals was in Houston I shot BB recurve. It was my luck. I got paired with Skip Trafford. I learned so much those two days. I did not know it at the time but that was the entire BB Recurve class. So I got second place shooting a little better than half Skip's score.

Shooting all the local field shoots, I can almost predicated you'll be in the top 3 or 4, if not first shooting trad recurve. No competition!

In fact, for the most areas you can say it is dead. I apperciate NFAA for keeping the class. I am pretty sure it doesn't pay for its self.

If collecting hardware and ribbons was your goal (I am sure it is not or you would be there), all you have to do is shoot at most of the local shoots.

 
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