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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just out of boredom today I did a test on arrow flight of 2 completely different arrows from the same bow.

BOW: Bear Magnesium Take Down, B riser 45#, No. 3 limbs (64") = 48#
ARROW SET #1: GT 3555, 100gr tip= 360gr total weight
ARROW SET #2: GT 5575 250gr tip = 560gr total weight

I shot both sets of arrows from 20 yards. Both sets flew very well and were both grouping excellently. Now obviously the lighter arrows shot faster and flatter than the heavier ones. I was quite surprised at the similarities.

Question for you, (I have my own ideas as to what to do) would you rather hunt with a flatter/faster arrow and depend on shot placement or a heavier arrow with greater kinetic energy?

This thread is for discussion not as a right/wrong banter back and forth.


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Bows, Broadheads and Backstraps
 

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I'm going reasonably fast and relatively light, 43# and 375 grains, and know that I can hit my spot if my yardage is off a yard or two...
 

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My nit-picking focuses on your heavier arrow with shaft only weighing 110 grains, even at 6 GPI a 30 inch shaft weighs 180 grains.
360 grains total weight and 250 grain head......
That baby weighs more than 360 grains....according to my small-school math.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
My nit-picking focuses on your heavier arrow with shaft only weighing 110 grains, even at 6 GPI a 30 inch shaft weighs 180 grains.

360 grains total weight and 250 grain head......

That baby weighs more than 360 grains....according to my small-school math.
Oops,type-O. Should be 3555 should be 360 and 5575 should be 560gr
Thanks for seeing that.

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Bows, Broadheads and Backstraps
 

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My opinion is to avoid either extreme. I like speed, but I like exit holes if I can get them and I believe a heavier arrow helps achieve that.
One of my favorite arrows works out to be around 9 grains per pound. 500 grain arrow @ #45 draw, speed is mid to upper 180's.
I have several others that are heavier that tune well for me. Out to 20 yards or so, my sight picture doesn't change much, beyond 30 yards they drop more.
 

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Given those choices, though some will say the light arrow will give pass throughs on whitetails, I would go with the heavier arrow with heavier head.
My hunting arrows weigh something like 450 grains, which falls somewhere in between your 2 arrow weights.
After you get a bunch more answers, I hope you'll fill us in on your thoughts, I'm always ready to hear thoughts on hunting arrows.
Thanks for starting this thread.
 

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I can think of scenarios where either would be the better arrow but I try for 10g per pound for my hunting arrows.
Not really fast or slow,just what suits me an I know it works.
So,somewhere in the middle with two blade head.

John.
 

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this is all my opinion and personal preference but I hunt heavy. i like pass-throughs and with many dozen deer under my belt and quite a bit of time in africa to me its not even close. you may get away with the lighter faster arrow on whitetail but on bigger game of if you make some bone contact its a different world. while your gaps will grow with a heavier arrow i think with a reasonable self imposed yardage limitation of 30-35 (for me perhaps others are shooting farther and while i can shoot farther i wont hunt trad farther) yards for me with trad gear the difference is a few inches and the flatness doesnt make all that much difference. Btw to me again the heavier arrow really makes its mark at the farther distances as the extra weight really punches things better at a further range as the heavier arrow loses speed at a slower rate than the lighter one due to its higher ballistic coefficient. Similar to why long range shooters generally shoot the heaviest bullet they can when shooting at extreme ranges there is a point down range where the heavier bullet is actually flying faster than a lighter one that came out of the bore at a higher speed.
 

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For me I'm shooting a medium 450gr arrow for hunting elk. Thin skin deer and antelope 380gr arrow does a nice job.
So many variables on a hunting shot just not distance. Some years I'm deadly at 40-45 others I will not shoot past 30-35, demeanor of the animal, weather, position of me and the animal.
In general hunting west a longer shot is all you get, shot placement is most important to me IMHO.

Chad
 

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i'd have to ask what am I hunting. I'd feel very uncomfortable shooting an elk sized animal with 360 grains from a 48 pound bow. I'm not saying it wouldn't work, I just don't want to find out it wouldn't.

Bowmania
 

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Ty Pelfrey and Scott A. Mention their string walking setups for hunting. Most of us would consider their arrows light(375gr if memory is right). Ty blew through a 1.5 yr old Wisconsin buck at 43yds. Scott mentions taking elk with his light setup. I agree with others, bone contact is a huge issue, more so on older age deer. At the end of the day, it's the truest flying arrow that penetrates best, and no added weight changes that.
 
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